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Green Library
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 29 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource.
  • Preface; Contents; Influence of Chemical Additives and Flyash on the Swelling and Bearing Resistance of Expansive Subgrade Soil; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Materials Used and Experimental Methods; 2.1 Natural Soil; 2.2 Flyash; 2.3 Aluminum Chloride; 2.4 Sample Preparation and Curing; 2.5 Methods of Testing; 3 Results and Discussion; 3.1 Effect of Additives on Consistency Limits; 3.2 Effect of Additives on Swell Properties; 3.3 California Bearing Ratio; 4 Conclusion; References; Characterization of Unsaturated Shrink-Swell Soils Properties in Egypt; Abstract; 1 Introduction
  • 2 Laboratory Investigations2.1 Natural Soil Samples; 2.2 Bentonite-Silty Clay Soil Mixtures; 3 Testing Program; 3.1 Soil Index Properties; 3.2 Moisture Diffusion and Volume Change Properties; 4 Results and Discussion; 4.1 Soil Shrink-Swell Index; 4.2 Soil Swell Limit; 4.3 Suction Compressibility Index; 4.4 Soil Coefficients of Unsaturated Diffusivity; 4.5 Soil Swell Potential; 5 Model Verification; 6 Conclusions; References; Strength Property of Expansive Soils Treated with Bagasse Ash and Lime; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Materials and Experimental Work; 2.1 Materials
  • 2.2 Mixture Preparation2.3 The Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) Tests; 2.4 Effect of Wetting-Drying Cycles on UCS; 3 Results and Discussion; 3.1 Effect of Bagasse Ash Curing Time on UCS; 3.2 Effect of Bagasse Ash on Durability; 4 Conclusions; References; Stabilization of an Expansive Soil Using Alkali Activated Fly Ash Based Geopolymer; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Materials and Methods; 2.1 Material Characterization; 2.2 Sample Preparation and Testing; 3 Results and Discussions; 3.1 Unconfined Compressive Strength of Expansive Soil Fly Ash Mixture
  • 3.2 Unconfined Compressive Strength of Alkaline-Activated Fly Ash Treated Samples3.3 Effect of Percentage of Water on UCS of Fly Ash Treated Samples; 3.4 Effect of Activator/Ash Ratio; 3.5 Mineralogical Studies; 3.6 Rheological Study; 3.6.1 Setting Time; 4 Conclusions; References; Determination of Shrinkage Properties of Clayey Soils by the Image Analysis Technique; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Materials and Methods; 3 Results and Discussion; 4 Conclusion; References; Effect of Cement on Suction and Pore Size Distribution Before and After Swelling of a Natural Clay from Algeria; Abstract
  • 1 Introduction2 Site Location and Geotechnical Identification; 2.1 Clayey Soil Identification; 2.2 Cement; 3 Sample Preparations; 4 Results and Discussion; 4.1 Effect of Cement on Suction; 4.2 Effect of Cement on Swelling; 4.3 Effect of Cement on Pore Distribution Before and After Swelling; 5 Conclusion; References; Treatment of Collapsible Soils by Cement Using the Double Consolidation Method; Abstract; 1 Introduction; 2 Experimental Work; 2.1 Materials; 3 Results and Discussion; 3.1 Untreated Samples; 4 Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References
Book
1 online resource.
  • Direct Shear Testing of Sand - Geotextile InterfacesConsideration of geosynthetic tension in interpretation of data from inclined plane testsStress -Strain Behaviour of Sand with Disc Plate-Shaped ReinforcementSwelling and Shrinkage Behaviour of Expansive Soil Blended with Lime and FibresFEASIBILITY OF UTILIZATION OF METALIZED PLASTIC WASTE IN COHESION-LESS SOILComparison of geotextile-reinforced and geogrid-reinforced flexible pavements by numerical analyses.Study on square footing resting on prestressed geotextile reinforced sandNumerical Studies on Ground Improvement Using Geosynthetic Reinforced Sand LayerBearing capacity prediction of inclined loaded strip footing on reinforced sand by ANNSoft Soil Improvement with Conventional and Geogrid-encased Stone Piles under an EmbankmentAnalysis and Design of Piled Geogrid-Reinforced-Earth EmbankmentCase Study on GeoTrel (R) Reinforced Earth (R) Steepened Slopes on Soft Founding Soils for the Approach of Major Bridge over River Kaljani at CoochBehar in West Bengal, IndiaPrediction of Ultimate Bearing Capacity of Eccentrically Loaded Rectangular Foundations using ANN.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319635699 20171127
Soil reinforcement is a very useful technique to construct several cost-effective soil structures in an environmentally friendly and sustainable manner. The most commonly used reinforcement materials are galvanised steel strips, geosynthetics in the form of woven geotextiles, geogrids and geocomposites, and fibres from natural and waste products. In recent years, there have been advances in the area of soil reinforcement, especially in the utilization of the technique in field projects. The researchers have also been working to understand the behaviour of reinforced soil considering the field challenges of reinforced soil structures. This edited volume contains contributions on advances in reinforced soil structures, mainly flexible pavements, footings, embankments, stone columns/piles, and slopes, as covered in the subject areas of geosynthetic engineering and fibre-reinforced soil engineering. The first paper by Ioannis N. Markou presents the details of sand-geotextile interaction based on interface tests with conventional and large-scale direct shear equipment. The second paper by Atef Ben Othmen and Mounir Bouassida examines the interface properties of geosynthetic reinforcement by carrying out inclined plane tests under low confinement adapted to landfill covers conditions. The third paper by J.N. Jha, S.K. Shukla, A.K. Choudhary, K.S. Gill1 and B.P. Verma deals with the triaxial compression behaviour of soil reinforced with steel and aluminium solid plates in horizontal layers. The fourth paper by M. Muthukumar and S.K. Shukla describes the swelling and shrinkage behaviour of expansive soil blended with lime and fibres. The fifth paper by S.G. Shah, A.C. Bhogayata and S.K. Shukla provides the test results of shear strength of cohesionless soil reinforced with metalized plastic waste. The sixth paper by Bouacha Nadjet compares the geotextile-reinforced and geogrid-reinforced flexible pavements based on numerical analyses. The seventh paper by S. Kumar, C.H. Solanki, J.B. Patel, P.B. Sudevan and P.M. Chaudhary reports the results of laboratory model tests carried out on a square footing resting on prestressed geotextile reinforced sand. The eighth paper by Sanoop G and Satyajit Patel presents the numerical studies on ground improvement using geosynthetic reinforced sand layer. The ninth paper by ------------------- discusses the bearing capacity prediction of inclined loaded strip footing on reinforced sand by ANN. The tenth paper by Mohamad B.D. Elsawy presents the numerical simulation of an embankment, constructed on reinforced soft soil with conventional stone piles. The eleventh paper by N.O. Sheta and R.P. Frizzi deals with the analysis, design, construction and monitoring of a geosynthetics-reinforced-earth pile-supported embankment serving as an access road. The twelfth paper by S. Banerjee, A. Adhikari, S. Chatterjee and D. Das provides the details of a case study on reinforced slope on soft soil for the approach of a major bridge. We do hope the researchers and the engineers may find the contributions in this volume very useful. This volume is part of the proceedings of the 1st GeoMEast International Congress and Exhibition on Sustainable Civil Infrastructures, Egypt 2017.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319635699 20171127
Book
1 online resource.
  • Chapter 1: Introductory overview of the projected distress.- Chapter 2: Water requirements for prevailing cropping pattern.- Chapter 3: Prevailing cropping pattern in Egypt.- Chapter 4: Cropping pattern to increase food security.- Chapter 5: Cropping pattern to face water scarcity.- Chapter 6: Cropping pattern to face salinity stress.- Chapter 7: Future water requirements for prevailing cropping pattern.- Chapter 8: Cropping pattern to face climate change stress.- Chapter 9: Crops Intensification Rate under the Proposed Cropping Patterns.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319698793 20180213
This book provides state-of-the art analysis, never done before in Egypt, on agro-climatic zones level. This study deals with how the national cropping pattern can be modified to overcome abiotic stresses, such as water scarcity, induced salinity and climate change to reduce their negative effects on food production. To this end, different cropping patterns are suggested. This study can be a framework for other developing countries to be used in quantifying and filling the gap in their knowledge about practices that can help in increasing their food security through increasing food production. Furthermore, the study is useful for policy makers to help them in their future plans and policies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319698793 20180213
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
1 online resource.
  • Section 1: Injecting Artificial Intelligence into Governmental Systems 1. A Day in the Life of a Federal Analyst and a Federal Contractor 2. Disseminating Government Data Effectively in the Age of Open Data 3. Machine Learning for the Government: Challenges and Statistical Difficulties 4. Making the Case for Artificial Intelligence at the Government: Guidelines to Transforming Federal Software Section 2: Governmental Data Science Solutions Around the World 5. Agricultural Data Analytics for Environmental Monitoring in Canada 6. France's Governmental Big Data Analytics: From Predictive to Prescriptive Using R 7. Agricultural Remote Sensing and Data Science in China 8. Data Visualization of Complex Information Through Mind Mapping in Spain and the European Union Section 3: Federal Data Science Use Cases at the US Government 9. A Deployment Life Cycle Model for Agricultural Data Systems Using Kansei Engineering and Association Rules 10. Federal Big Data Analytics in the Health Domain: An Ontological Approach to Data Interoperability 11. Geospatial Data Discovery, Management, and Analysis at National Aeronautics and Space Administration 12. Intelligent Automation Tools and Software Engines for Managing Federal Agricultural Data 13. Transforming Governmental Data Science Teams in the Future.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128124437 20180213
Federal Data Science serves as a guide for federal software engineers, government analysts, economists, researchers, data scientists, and engineering managers in deploying data analytics methods to governmental processes. Driven by open government (2009) and big data (2012) initiatives, federal agencies have a serious need to implement intelligent data management methods, share their data, and deploy advanced analytics to their processes. Using federal data for reactive decision making is not sufficient anymore, intelligent data systems allow for proactive activities that lead to benefits such as: improved citizen services, higher accountability, reduced delivery inefficiencies, lower costs, enhanced national insights, and better policy making. No other government-dedicated work has been found in literature that addresses this broad topic. This book provides multiple use-cases, describes federal data science benefits, and fills the gap in this critical and timely area. Written and reviewed by academics, industry experts, and federal analysts, the problems and challenges of developing data systems for government agencies is presented by actual developers, designers, and users of those systems, providing a unique and valuable real-world perspective.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128124437 20180213
Book
463 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (chiefly color) ; 24 cm
  • 1946-1968 -- De l'urgence alimentaire à l'impératif de productivité : la recherche au service du "progrès" -- La résurgence de la question des subsistances dans la première moitié du XXe siècle -- La France de l'entre-deux-guerres : une grande nation agricole en panne d'ambition scientifique et de stratégie économique -- La gestation d'un ordre alimentaire mondial dans le chaos de la Seconde Guerre mondiale -- Urgence alimentaire et réorientations stratégiques dans l'Europe de l'immédiat après-guerre -- La puissance américaine et l'impératif géopolitique de l'alimentation des nations européennes -- Ouvrir l'agriculture à la productivité : la voie américaine du "progrès" -- Le défi de l'Inra à sa création : réinventer la recherche agronomique française -- Des sols, des serres et des étables pour soutenir le modèle de la recherche-expérimentation -- Importer et adapter la science internationale -- Dirigisme économique et mobilisation scientifique pour une réorientation de l'agriculture française -- Acteur zélé mais secondaire du redressement productif -- L:Inra se fait une place dans l'économie politique du productivisme -- Le "moment Mendès France" : une ouverture inespérée -- Le temps du volontarisme gaullien : une place de choix pour la recherche orientée -- Le fort soutien de la nouvelle Délégation générale à la recherche scientifique et technique -- L'heure de la construction européenne -- Un institut en ordre de bataille pour une conception intégrée de l'innovation agronomique -- L'esprit de conquête vient à la recherche agronomique -- Les puissants alliés modernistes et planificateurs de l'Inra -- L'Inra, entre technoscience et biopouvoir : la loi sur l'élevage de 1966 -- Au tournant des années 1960-1970 : le cap des tempêtes -- 1969-1989 -- La recherche agronomique dans la mue libérale des sociétés industrialisées -- L'Inra face au choix de l'industrialisation de l'alimentation -- Le leitmotiv politique de la "science efficace" -- L'Inra, laboratoire d'un système agroalimentaire en expansion -- Sciences de l'animal et industriels face à la massification de l'alimentation carnée -- EInra affirme son expertise sur les questions alimentaires -- La recherche agronomique, entre défi bioscientifique et enjeux systémiques -- La question environnementale à l'agenda de la recherche agronomique -- L'objectivation scientifique de la qualité d'origine : recherches et initiatives locales -- Recherche et vulgarisation technique : repenser la diffusion du "progrès" -- Le saut qualitatif de la biologie moléculaire -- Crise et refondation de la gouvernance de la recherche agronomique -- Réinventer le dialogue avec l'État -- L'Inra, laboratoire de la refondation de la politique nationale de la recherche dans l'après 1981 -- Les biotechnologies, fer de lance de l'innovation agronomique -- Biologie moléculaire et industrialisation du vivant -- L'Inra dans la mobilisation nationale en faveur de l'innovation biotechnologique -- Nouveaux territoires, nouvelles échelles pour la politique scientifique de l'Inra -- Untrospection et réajustements -- L'Inra à l'heure de la régionalisation des politiques publiques -- La sortie du pré carré national : l'atout européen, la contrainte transatlantique -- 1990-2012
  • La recherche agronomique à l'heure de la globalisation agricole, alimentaire et environnementale -- La recherche agronomique française dans la nouvelle économie de la connaissance -- Les risques de marginalisation et de délitement de la culture agronomique -- L'Inra à la recherche d'une boussole -- L'Inra en quête d'un nouveau contrat social -- La redéfinition de la raison scientifique de la recherche agronomique -- La rénovation du dialogue avec la société et avec les régions -- Du local au global : l'environnement à l'Inra à partir de la Conférence de Rio de 1992 -- La recherche au temps des crises sanitaires : l'acclimatation de l'Inra au mode de la controverse -- La vache folle : crise sanitaire et contestation de la modernité alimentaire -- Les organismes génétiquement modifiés : les biosciences dans l'arène du débat public -- Vers une nouvelle culture de l'action : l'inscription des attentes de la société dans le système de recherche -- La réforme de 1997-1998 et ses suites : refonder et réorienter -- La redéfinition de l'expertise scientifique -- L'Inra modernise sa gouvernance stratégique -- L'entrée de l'Inra dans une science de l'action globalisée -- L'institutionnalisation du tripode "agriculture, alimentation, environnement" -- La reconfiguration des périmètres scientifiques -- Une science intégrée pour une projection internationale -- LEurope, espace de déploiement de la recherche finalisée d'excellence -- Dans la tourmente des réformes du système de recherche national : anticiper et maîtriser le changement institutionnel -- Entre écologie et agriculture, l'émergence d'une nouvelle mission régalienne -- Ressources et subsistances à l'heure de la planétarisation des systèmes alimentaires -- L'Inra à la croisée des chemins du changement global -- Index des noms cités -- Bibliographie indicative.
"Alors que le monde industrialisé pensait en avoir fini avec la question des subsistances, la Seconde Guerre mondiale replace l'agriculture et l'alimentation au coeur des enjeux de la reconstruction. L'Europe de l'Ouest, ravagée et affaiblie, se tourne alors vers les États-Unis pour penser une modernisation capable de fonder une nouvelle expansion. En France, l'après-guerre est ainsi le théâtre d'une profonde transformation du monde rural sous l'effet de la diffusion volontariste du "progrès", instrument d'une mise à niveau de la productivité agricole au service de la restauration de la position française dans le monde. Dans ce contexte, la création en 1946 de l'Institut national de la recherche agronomique (Inra) constitue un moment crucial de la rencontre entre science et politique, dans la quête d'une voie de développement qui mobilise les outils des sciences du vivant pour en rationaliser l'exploitation. D'abord conçu comme un institut de recherche et d'expérimentation dévolu à la seule agriculture, l'Inra élargit peu à peu ses missions, déployant des compétences nouvelles sur les industries agroalimentaires, la nutrition, la biologie moléculaire ou encore l'environnement. Serviteur zélé des politiques publiques de modernisation, 'Institut s'affirme dans le concert des grands opérateurs de recherche, aux côtés du CNRS, de l'Inserm et de l'Institut Pasteur. Mais confronté à l'essor de la recherche privée, à l'effacement du volontarisme d'État et à la montée de la contestation des sciences et des techniques, il se trouve précocement contraint, dans les années 1980 et surtout 1990, à repenser en profondeur son identité et son rôle, dans la prise de conscience croissante de l'interconnexion des questions agricoles, alimentaires et environnementales. Au coeur des enjeux de l'économie de la connaissance du monde contemporain, la trajectoire historique de l'Inra représente une véritable énigme, observatoire privilégié de la genèse d'une gouvernance globale du vivant et de la sécurité alimentaire. Fondé sur une documentation originale et sur un recours à la mémoire des acteurs, le présent ouvrage constitue la première synthèse historique sur cet organisme de recherche."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Introduction.- Soils of the Tropical Coastal Plain.- Soils from the great tabular cone totally covered with volcanic ash.- Soils from the great tabular cone of Santo Domingo.- Soils from the western Andean Piedmont.- Soils from the Chongon-Colonche mountain range.- Soils of the Andean Highlands.- Soils from the northern Andean highlands.- Soils from the central Andean highlands.- Soils from the southern Andean highlands.- Soils of the Amazonian region.- Soils from the sub-Andean reliefs.- Soils of Galapagos Islands.- Soils from the Santa Cruz Island.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319253176 20180213
This is the first book to comprehensively discuss Ecuadorian soils. Richly illustrated, it provides information on the unique characteristics and distribution of these soils. Due to the influence of the Andes, which vastly modified the climate and parental materials, a relative small country like Ecuador has a wide variety of soil orders, rarely found in other countries. The country is divided into three distinctive regions by the Andes: The Coastal Plain, the Andean Highlands, and the Amazonia Region each with different soil development, influenced by the varying conditions in that region.It is also necessary to consider the Galapagos Islands as a separate region with a particular climate and parental material.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319253176 20180213
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
1 online resource.
  • Contents Foreword........................................................ ................................................................ .................... Preface......................................................... ................................................................ ....................... Editors......................................................... ................................................................ ..................... Contributors.................................................... ................................................................ .................. Section Iâ Mine Site Characterization Chapter 1 Characterization and Improvement in Physical, Chemical, and Biological Properties of Mine Wastes.......................................................... ................................... Binoy Sarkar, Hasintha Wijesekara, Sanchita Mandal, Mandeep Singh, and Nanthi S. Bolan Chapter 2 Chemical Characterization of Mine Sites........................................................... ......... Xinni Xiong, Daniel C.W. Tsang, and Yong Sik Ok Chapter 3 Sources and Management of Acid Mine Drainage...................................................... S.R. Gurung, Hasintha Wijesekara, Balaji Seshadri, R.B. Stewart, P.E.H. Gregg, and Nanthi S. Bolan Section IIâ Mine Site Rehabilitation Practices Chapter 4 Use of Biowaste for Mine Site Rehabilitation: A Meta-Analysis on Soil Carbon Dynamics........................................................ ................................... Hasintha Wijesekara, Nanthi S. Bolan, Kim Colyvas, Balaji Seshadri, Yong Sik Ok, Yasser M. Awad, Yilu Xu, Ramesh Thangavel, Aravind Surapaneni, Christopher Saint, and Meththika Vithanage Chapter 5 Rehabilitation of Biological Characteristics in Mine Tailings.................................... Longbin Huang and Fang You Chapter 6 Nanoscale Materials for Mine Site Remediation..................................................... ... Tapan Adhikari and Rajarathnam Dharmarajan Section IIIâ Post Mine Site Land-Use Practices Chapter 7 Profitable Beef Cattle Production on Rehabilitated Mine Lands.............................. D. Murdoch and Rajasekar Karunanithi Chapter 8 Restoring Forests on Surface Coal Mines in Appalachia: A Regional Reforestation Approach with Global Application..................................................... Christopher D. Barton, Kenton Sena, Teagan Dolan, Patrick Angel, and Carl Zipper Chapter 9 Recreating a Headwater Stream System on a Valley Fill in Appalachia, USA......... Carmen T. Agouridis, Christopher D. Barton, and Richard C. Warner Chapter 10 Key Issues in Mine Closure Planning for Pit Lakes.................................................. Jerry A. Vandenberg and Cherie D. McCullough Chapter 11 Carbon Sequestration Potential on Mined Lands...................................................... Sally Brown, Andrew Trlica, John Lavery, and Mark Teshima Section IV Mine Site Revegetation Potential Chapter 12 Phytotechnologies for Mine Site Rehabilitation.................................................. ..... Ramesh Thangavel, Rajasekar Karunanithi, Hasintha Wijesekara, Yubo Yan, Balaji Seshadri, and Nanthi S. Bolan Chapter 13 Phytocapping of Mine Waste at Derelict Mine Sites in New South Wales............... Dane Lamb, Peter Sanderson, Liang Wang, Mohammed Kader, and Ravi Naidu Chapter 14 Rehabilitation of an Abandoned Mine Site with Biosolids....................................... Abdulaziz Alghamdi, M.B. Kirkham, Deann R. Presley, Ganga Hettiarachchi, and Leigh Murray Chapter 15 Dynamics of Heavy Metal(loid)s in Mine Soils........................................................ Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Nanthi S. Bolan, S. Chowdhury, J.H. Park, H.S. Kim, G. Choppala, B.P. Singh, and W.I. Kim Section V C ase Studies of Successful Mine Site Rehabilitation Chapter 16 Mine Site Reclamation in Canada: Overview and Case Studies............................... Jin-Hyeob Kwak, Abimbola Ojekanmi, Min Duan, Scott X. Chang, and M. Anne Naeth Chapter 17 Case Studies of Successful Mine Site Rehabilitation: Malaysia............................... Soon Kong Yong and Suhaimi Abdul Talib Chapter 18 Mine Rehabilitation in New Zealand: Overview and Case Studies.......................... Robyn C. Simcock and Craig W. Ross Index........................................................... ................................................................ ....................
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498767613 20171121
The remediation of mine spoil is a global environmental issue affecting most nations. This book covers both the fundamental and practical aspects of remediation and revegetation of mine site spoils. It follows three major themes including characterisation of mine site spoils; remediation of chemical, physical, and biological constraints of mine site spoils; and revegetation of remediated mine site spoils. Each theme contains chapters featuring case studies involving mine sites around the world. The book provides a complete narrative of how inert spoil could be converted to live soil.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498767613 20171121
Book
xvi, 465 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
The green revolution in India about 50 years ago transformed India's image then as begging bowl to bread basket. This transformation during the 1960s took just about 4 years. The yield increases achieved in wheat and then in rice which occurred in just about half decade is far in excess of the yield increases during the preceding 4000 years. This remarkable feat was achieved with the leadership of the author using the dwarf wheat types which had been produced by Norman Borlaug in Mexico.The research and development of green revolution of wheat and rice at the Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi was led by the author along with his team of students and co-workers. He has published over 100 papers on green revolution and the ever-green revolution which is a refinement of the former. This book is a compilation of just about 40 of his numerous research papers, monographs and books published by him on this subject.The papers in this book bring out the scientific basis of the modification of the plant type so as to be responsive to exogenous addition of chemical fertilizers and irrigation. The ideal plant type enables capture of adequate sunlight and using the chemical fertilizers added to the soil, produce substantial photosynthetic starch. And because the plants have short and thick culm, they are able to withstand enormous amounts of grains in their ears. This indeed was the basis of breaking the yield barriers associated with native varieties. The book also brings out that green revolution had established the food security at the national level but not at the individual household levels of millions of resource-poor rural small and marginal farming, fishing and landless families. Further green revolution was commodity-centric and the manner of its practice led to environmental degradation and social inequities. This author realized as early as 1972 that system of agriculture in India should be designed to fight both the famines of food and rural livelihoods. In pursuit of it, this author further designed an evergreen revolution with systems approach. What this means is providing concurrent attention to ecological foundations of agriculture and the livelihoods of the rural people.The book also brings out that green revolution was a team effort involving scientists, policy makers, administrators, farmers and students. This book is an outstanding example of green revolution providing a breathing space by putting the cereal grain production rate ahead of the population growth rate and then when food security has been adequately established, the system is changed to achieve productivity in perpetuity without causing environmental and social harm.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789813200067 20170710
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • Part 1: Advances and Prospects for Understanding Stress Environments.- Chapter 1. Abiotic Stresses in Agriculture: An Overview.- Chapter 2. Atmospheric Stressors: Challenges and Coping Strategies.- Chapter 3. Agriculture Drought Management Options: Scope and Opportunities.- Chapter 4. Edaphic Stresses: Concerns and Opportunities for Their Management.- Part 2: Adaptation and Mitigation Options.- Chapter 5. Managing Soil Related Abiotic Constraints for Sustainable Agriculture.- Chapter 6. Developments in Management of Abiotic Stresses in Dryland Agriculture.- Chapter 7. Heavy Metal Toxicities in Soils and Their Management.- Chapter 8. Current Trends in Salinity and Water logging Tolerance.- Chapter 9. Impacts and Management of Temperature and Water Stress in Crop Plants.- Chapter 10. Plant Bio-regulators: A Mitigation Strategy for Resilient Agriculture.- Chapter 11. Thiourea: A Potential Bioregulator for Alleviating Abiotic Stresses.- Part 3: Crop Based Mitigation Strategies.- Chapter 12. Improving Crop Adaptations to Climate Change: Contextualizing the Strategy.- Chapter 13. Biotechnological Applications for Improvement of Drought Tolerance.- Chapter 14. Managing Abiotic Stresses in Wheat.- Chapter 15. Breeding Rice Varieties for Abiotic Stress Tolerance: Challenges and Opportunities.- Chapter 16. Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Barley.- Chapter 17. Sugarcane crop: Its Tolerance towards Abiotic Stresses.- Chapter 18.Abiotic Stress Management in Horticulture Crops.- Chapter 19. Impact of Climate Change on Vegetable Production and Adaptation Measures.- Part 4: Mitigation Options in Animal Husbandry.- Chapter 20. Nutritional Management for Sustaining Livestock during Drought.- Chapter 21. Mitigation Options for GHG Emissions from Ruminants.- Chapter 22. Mitigation of Climatic Change Effects for Sheep Farming in Arid Environment.- Chapter 23. Policy Support for Abiotically Stressed Agro-ecosystems: Challenges and Opportunities.- Chapter 24. Inculcating Resilience to Agriculture under Abiotically Stressed Environments: Synthesis and Way Forward.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811057434 20171211
This book offers a state-of-the-art overview of on abiotic stresses in terms of the challenges; scope and opportunities; copping strategies for adaptation and mitigation using novel tools for building resilience in agricultural crops and livestock; as well as for policy implementation. Divided into four major parts: advances and prospects for understanding stress environments; adaptation and mitigation options; crop-based mitigation strategies; and mitigation options in animal husbandry, the book focuses on problem-solving approaches and techniques that are essential for the medium to long-term sustainability of agricultural production systems The synthesis and integration of knowledge and experiences of specialists from different disciplines offers new perspectives in the versatile field of abiotic stress management, and as such is useful for various stakeholders, including agricultural students, scientists, environmentalists, policymakers, and social scientists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811057434 20171211
Book
1 online resource ( xxii, 397 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Part 1. Concepts.- Chapter 1. Digital Soil Mapping and Best Management of Soil Resources: A Brief Discussion with Few Case Studies.- Chapter 2. Are the Traditional Soil Analyses Will Pass into Oblivion? Adaptive Remote Sensing Approach in Support of Precision Agriculture.- Chapter 3. Site Specific Nutrient Management (SSNM) - An Unique Approach towards Maintaining Soil Health.- Chapter 4. Soil Mineralogical Perspective on Immobilization/Mobilization of Heavy Metals.- Chapter 5. Using Laboratory Analysis to Inform Adaptive Management.- Chapter 6. Microbial Proteins and Soil Carbon Sequestration.- Part 2. Adaptive Soil Management Strategies.- Chapter 7. Use of Soil Amendments in An Integrated Framework for Adaptive Resource Management in Agriculture and Forestry.- Chapter 8. Resource Conservation Technologies for Sustainable Soil Health Management.- Chapter 9. Sustainable Management of Soil Phosphorus in A Changing World.- Chapter 10. Wastewater in Agriculture: Possibilities and Limitations.- Chapter 11. Eco- friendly Nitrogen Fertilizers for Sustainable Agriculture.- Chapter 12. Scope of Natural Source of Potassium in Sustainable Agriculture.- Chapter 13. Changes in Soil-Plant-Microbes Interactions in Anticipated Climatic Change Conditions.- Chapter 14. Adaptive Soil Management-A Tool For Plant Fitness in Stressful Environment Through Microbial Integrity .- Chapter 15. Impact of Agricultural Management Practices on Mycorrhizal Functioning and Soil Micro-Biological Parameters Under Soybean-Based Cropping Systems.- Chapter 16. Bioremediation of Contaminated Soils: An Overview.- Chapter 17. Bioremediation of Soils Contaminated With Ni and Cd-An Overview.- Chapter 18. Urban Soil's Functions: Monitoring, Assessment and Management.- Part 3. Regional and Global Initiatives For Soil Resource Management.- Chapter 19. Enhancing Resource Use Efficiency Through Soil Management for Improving Livelihoods.- Chapter 20. The Relevance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in Agricultural Sustainability of The Semi Arid Tropics.- Chapter 21. The Effects of Forest Fire on Soil Organic Matter and Nutrients in Boreal Forests of North America: A Review.- Chapter 22. Climate Mediated Changes in Permafrost and Their Effects on Natural and Human Environments.- Chapter 23. Integrated Natural resource management in India through Participatory Integrated Watershed Management.- Chapter 24. Monitoring and Assessing Anthropogenic Influence on Soil's Health in Urban Forests (The Case From Moscow City).- Chapter 25. Impacts Assessment of Municipal Solid Squander Dumping in Riparian Corridor Using Multivariate Statistical Techniques .
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811036378 20170515
The book focuses in detail on learning and adapting through partnerships between managers, scientists, and other stake-holders who learn together how to create and maintain sustainable resource systems. As natural areas shrink and fragment, our ability to sustain economic growth and safeguard biological diversity and ecological integrity is increasingly being put to the test. In attempting to meet this unprecedented challenge, adaptive management is becoming a viable alternative for broader application. Adaptive management is an iterative decision-making process which is both operationally and conceptually simple and which incorporates users to acknowledge and account for uncertainty, and sustain an operating environment that promotes its reduction through careful planning, evaluation, and learning until the desired results are achieved. This multifaceted approach requires clearly defined management objectives to guide decisions about what actions to take, and explicit assumptions about expected outcomes to compare against actual outcomes. In this edited book, we address the issue by pursuing a holistic and systematic approach that utilizes natural resources to reap sustainable environmental, economic and social benefits for adap-tive management, helping to ensure that relationships between land, water and plants are managed in ways that mimic nature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811036378 20170515
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Book
205 pages ; 23 cm
  • La grande casse -- C'est la guerre -- La PAC, cette maladie contagieuse -- Des hauts et des bas, mais surtout des bas -- La compétitivité à tout prix? -- L'enjeu de la faim -- Qui représente quoi ? -- De multiples ennuis, sans cesse -- Quel modèle ? -- C'est le souk -- L'autre versant -- La faim justifie les moyens -- L'eau, une ressource qui s'évapore -- Conclusion. Branle-bas de combat -- Appendice. Déclaration de Rome sur la sécurité alimentaire mondiale. Sommet mondial de l'alimentation (1996).
"Voyage au coeur d'un système français : l'agro alimentaire. Un puissant système qui crée du gaspillage, de la surproduction, de la malnutrition et de la pollution. En 2017, l'agriculture française est entre les mains des lobbies (Lactalis, Bigard, Monsanto, Bayer). Conséquences : une utilisation intensive de pesticides, des pratiques choquantes dans la grande distribution, des organisations syndicales et coopératives qui enfoncent un peu plus les paysans dans la misère. L'agriculture française est prête à exploser ! Ce livre est un plaidoyer et une enquête qui dénonce et apporte des solutions."--Page 4 of cover."--Page 4 of cover."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 291 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • 1 Introduction 2 Evolution of agriculture development in India 3 Agricultural growth process 4 Agriculture growth and regional change 5 Regional dimensions of land and labour productivity 6 Regional convergence in agricultural productivity 7 Hierarchically nested agriculture regions of India 8 Agriculture growth models 9 Food production, consumption and insecurity 10 Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138925175 20170313
Agriculture productivity, growth and regional change in post-colonial India from a spatial perspective are yet to be rigorously examined. In particular, the impacts of economic liberalisation, globalisation and deregulation are not being empirically investigated at a small-area level using advanced statistical and spatial techniques. Understanding the process of regional formation and the rapid transitioning of agricultural landscapes in the Post-Liberalisation phase is pivotal to developing and devising regional economic development strategies. This book employs advanced methods to empirically examine the key characteristics and patterns of regional change in agricultural growth and productivity. It offers insights on changes in agricultural production and practices since the colonial period through to the Post-Liberalisation phase in India. It also incorporates the key public policy debates on the progress of India's agricultural development with the aim of formulating spatially integrated strategies to reduce rapid rise in the regional convergence and to promote equitable distribution of strategic government investment.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138925175 20170313
Green Library
Book
vi, 74 pages ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (1 volume) : illustrations
Book
1 online resource : illustrations
  • Section I: Reinventing Farming Systems 1. Introduction 2. Agroecology: Principles and Practice 3. Farming-Related Livelihoods 4. Farming Systems for Sustainable Intensification 5. Designing for the Long-term: Sustainable Agriculture Section II: Resources for Agricultural Development 6. Low-Input Technology: An Integrative View 7. Ecologically Based Nutrient Management 8. Participatory Breeding: Developing Improved and Relevant Crop Varieties With Farmers 9. Research on Livestock, Livelihoods, and Innovation Section III: Context for Sustainable Agricultural Development 10. Gender and Agrarian Inequities 11. The Innovation Systems Approach to Agricultural Research and Development 12. Outreach to Support Rural Innovation 13. Climate Change and Agricultural Systems Section IV: Tying It All Together 14. Tying It All Together: Global, Regional, and Local Integrations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128020708 20170410
Agricultural Systems, Second Edition, is a comprehensive text for developing sustainable farming systems. It presents a synthetic overview of the emerging area of agroecology applications to transforming farming systems and supporting rural innovation, with particular emphasis on how research can be harnessed for sustainable agriculture. The inclusion of research theory and examples using the principles of cropping system design allows students to gain a unique understanding of the technical, biological, ecological, economic and sociological aspects of farming systems science for rural livelihoods. This book explores topics such as: re-inventing farming systems; principles and practice of agroecology; agricultural change and low-input technology; ecologically-based nutrient management; participatory breeding for developing improved and relevant crops; participatory livestock research for development; gender and agrarian inequality at the local scale; the nature of agricultural innovation; and outreach to support rural innovation. The extensive coverage of subjects is complemented with integrated references and a companion website, making this book essential reading for courses in international agricultural systems and management, sustainable agricultural management, and cropping systems. This book will be a valuable resource for students of agricultural science, environmental engineering, and rural planning; researchers and scientists in agricultural development agencies; and practitioners of agricultural development in government extension programs, development agencies, and NGOs.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128020708 20170410
Book
1 online resource (504 p.) : ill.
"Good agroecological practices are indispensable for the development of sustainable agriculture. In this book, principles, diversity and applications of agroecological practices for a range of systems are presented, transforming scientific research and participatory knowledge of production into practical application. It illustrates a broad range of research and teaching being used within the farming community to demonstrate best practice and current state-of-play within the field. Agroecological methods used in crop farming, grass-based livestock farming, fish production, and other complex farming systems are discussed. Conclusions are drawn from studies to provide an outlook on future trends of agroecological practices and on policies supporting implementation. Due to emphasis on real-life application, it is relevant not only to students of the agricultural sciences and public policy, but also to researchers, stakeholders and policy makers involved in the development of sustainable agriculture."--Publisher's website.
Book
1 online resource () : illustrations (some color).
  • Foreword; Preface; Contents; Contributors; Chapter 1: Microbial Signaling in Plant-Microbe Interactions and Its Role on Sustainability of Agroecosystems; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Signalling Molecules in Plant-Microbe Interactions; 1.3 Microbial Coordination of Complex Network Interaction Within Soil Food Web and Plant-Microbe Interactions; 1.4 Regulation of Microbial Signalling Compounds by Biotic and Abiotic Factors; 1.5 Signalling Pathways in Soil Food Web Improve Ecosystem Functioning and Sustainability; 1.6 Technical Advances in Identifying Signalling Pathways in Soil-Plant System
  • 1.7 Conclusions and Future PerspectivesReferences; Chapter 2: Exploiting Beneficial Traits of Plant-ƯAssociated Fluorescent Pseudomonads for Plant Health; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Rhizosphere and Plant-Microbe Interaction; 2.3 Mechanisms of Plant Growth Promotion; 2.3.1 Phosphate Solubilization; 2.3.2 Phytohormones; 2.3.3 Siderophores; 2.3.4 Antibiotics; 2.3.5 Enzymes; 2.3.6 Hydrogen Cyanide; 2.4 Induced Systemic Resistance; 2.5 Biological Control of Plant Pathogens; 2.6 Fluorescent Pseudomonads in Agriculture and Plant Health; 2.7 Conclusions; References
  • Chapter 3: N2-Fixing Cyanobacterial Systems as Biofertilizer3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Distribution of Cyanobacteria; 3.3 Free-Living Cyanobacteria; 3.4 Azolla-Anabaena Symbiotic System; 3.5 Artificial Cyanobacterial-Plant Association; 3.6 Molecular Signaling Mechanism; 3.7 Selection of Competent Biofertilizer Strains; 3.8 Conclusions; References; Chapter 4: Exploring the Role of Secondary Metabolites of Trichoderma in Tripartite Interaction with Plant and Pathogens; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Trichoderma Secondary Metabolites in Trichoderma-Pathogen Interaction
  • 4.3 Trichoderma Secondary Metabolites in Trichoderma-Plant Interactions4.4 Secondary Metabolites Mediated Induction of Defense Response in Plants; 4.5 Secondary Metabolites Mediated Growth Regulation in Plants; 4.6 Biosynthesized Secondary Metabolites-Based Bioformulation; 4.7 Constrains in Commercialization of Secondary Metabolites-Based Bioformulation; 4.8 Conclusions; References; Chapter 5: Managing Soil Fertility Through Microbes: Prospects, Challenges and Future Strategies; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Organisms in Soil; 5.3 Macroorganisms in Soil; 5.3.1 Earthworms; 5.3.2 Termites
  • 5.3.3 Plant Roots5.4 Microorganisms in Soil; 5.4.1 Bacteria; 5.4.2 Actinomycetes; 5.4.3 Fungi; 5.4.4 Algae; 5.4.5 Protozoa; 5.4.6 Nematodes; 5.4.7 Viruses; 5.5 Role of Organism in Soil Fertility Enhancement; 5.5.1 N Transformations; 5.5.2 Phosphorus Cycle; 5.5.3 Sulfur Cycle; 5.5.4 Other Mineral Elements; 5.6 Environmental Contaminants and Climate Change; 5.6.1 Potentially Toxic Element; 5.6.2 Chromium (Cr); 5.6.3 Cadmium (Cd); 5.6.4 Lead (Pb); 5.6.5 Mercury (Hg); 5.6.6 Arsenic (As); 5.6.7 Selenium (Se); 5.6.8 Radionuclides; 5.7 Pesticides/Insecticides/Fungicides; 5.8 Effluents
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