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Book
1 online resource.
3D Bioprinting for Reconstructive Surgery: Techniques and Applications examines the combined use of materials, procedures and tools necessary for creating structural tissue constructs for reconstructive purposes. Offering a broad analysis of the field, the first set of chapters review the range of biomaterials which can be used to create 3D-printed tissue constructs. Part Two looks at the techniques needed to prepare biomaterials and biological materials for 3D printing, while the final set of chapters examines application-specific examples of tissues formed from 3D printed biomaterials. 3D printing of biomaterials for tissue engineering applications is becoming increasingly popular due to its ability to offer unique, patient-specific parts-on demand-at a relatively low cost. This book is a valuable resource for biomaterials scientists, biomedical engineers, practitioners and students wishing to broaden their knowledge in the allied field.
Book
xvi, 229 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
  • Overview. Overview of Traditional Medicine Situation in Africa. Legal Framework and Intellectual Property Rights. Property Rights and Traditional Medical Knowledge in Africa: Issues and Development. African Medicinal Plants and Traditional Medical Knowledge: Access and Benefit Sharing in the Context of Research and Development. Validation and Standardization. Using Appropriate Methodology and Technology for Research and Development of African Traditional Medicines. Innovative Nutritional Approach to Attenuate the Progression of HIV to AIDS among People Living with HIV (PLWH): A Study based in Abuja, Nigeria. Research adn Development of Niprisan for the Management of Sickle Cell Disorder. Neem. The Story of Centella asiatica in Madagascar. Development of New Products Based on African Indigenous Medical Knowledge in South Africa. Future Prospects of African Biodiversity and Traditional Medicine. Regulatory Issues Regarding Development and Commercialization of Products Derived from AIMK. African Traditional Medicine: The Way Forward.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138038103 20180611
Despite the relevance of and empirical evidence for African Traditional Medicine, based on African Indigenous Medical Knowledge (AIMK), research and development of new phytomedicines from this continent has been slow. African Indigenous Medical Knowledge and Human Health aims to provide a catalyst for health innovations based on the rich African biodiversity and AIMK. The book documents some of the success stories from the continent related to AIMK and serves as a one-step reference for all professionals interested in the research and development of medical interventions - including pharmacognosists, ethnobiologists, botanists, phytochemists, pharmacologists and medical scientists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138038103 20180611
Green Library
Book
xxiv, 372 pages ; 23 cm
'Written with perceptive sympathy for the wounded healer, it is necessary reading for both doctors and patients.' Hilary Mantel 'Crucial and timely.' Atul Gawande 'A furious dispatch from the front line of the hospital system.' The Times, 'Book of the Week' 'Fascinating and troubling. Read it and weep.' Susie Orbach 'Haunting, beautiful and urgent.' Johann Hari 'At the heart of this book is the problem of how emotional resilience can be identified in prospective doctors and strengthened in practising doctors. We are fallible human beings, not omniscient gods.' Henry Marsh, Sunday Times Doctors are the people we turn to when we fall ill. They are the people we trust with our lives, and with the lives of those we love. Yet who can doctors turn to at moments of stress, or when their own working lives break down? What does it take to confront death, disease, distress and suffering every day? To work in a healthcare system that is stretched to breaking point? To carry the responsibility of making decisions that can irrevocably change someone's life - or possibly end it? And how do doctors cope with their own questions and fears, when they are expected to have all the answers? Caroline Elton is a psychologist who specialises in helping doctors. For over twenty years she has listened as doctors have unburdened themselves of the pressures of their jobs: the obstetrician whose own fertility treatment failed; the trainee oncologist who found herself unable to treat patients suffering from the disease that killed her father; the brilliant neurosurgeon struggling to progress her career in an environment that was hostile to women. Drawing on extraordinary case studies and decades of work supporting clinicians, Also Human presents a provocative, perceptive and deeply humane examination of the modern medical profession.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781785150906 20180521
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • Preface vii 1 Introduction 1 References 3 2 Nanomaterials 5 2.1 Physical Properties of Nanomaterials 5 2.1.1 Thermodynamic Properties: Melting Point Depression and Superheating 7 2.1.2 Optical Properties 10 2.1.3 Magnetism 14 2.2 Nanomaterials: An Overview 21 2.2.1 Organic Nanoparticles 21 2.2.2 Inorganic Nanoparticles 38 References 65 3 Promising Applications in Medicine 79 3.1 Diagnostics 80 3.1.1 X-Ray Computed Tomography 80 3.1.2 Photoacoustic Imaging 85 3.1.3 Positron Emission Tomography 88 3.1.4 Magnetic Resonance Imaging 90 3.1.5 Raman-Based Diagnostics 95 3.2 Therapy 99 3.2.1 Chemotherapy 99 3.2.2 Hyperthermia 105 3.2.3 Radiotherapy 112 References 116 4 Interactions of Nanomaterials with Biological Systems 137 4.1 Cellular Level (in vitro) 137 4.1.1 Cellular Uptake and Intracellular Fate 137 4.1.2 Physio-Chemical Dependence of Nanomaterials Uptake 145 4.1.3 Cytotoxicity 149 4.2 Body Level (in vivo) 153 4.2.1 Blood Circulation 154 4.2.2 Immune/Inflammatory Response 168 4.2.3 Metabolism (RES, Degradation, Excretion and Persistence) 173 References 183 5 Nanomaterials in the Market or in the Way of 201 5.1 Approval pipeline (FDA and EMA) 202 5.2 Nanotherapeutics 205 5.3 Nanodiagnostics 209 References 212 6 Avoiding the Persistence of Metal Nanomaterials 217 6.1 Ultrasmall-in-Nano Approach 218 6.2 Porphyrin-Based Nanomaterials 229 References 233 7 Conclusions and Perspectives 241 References 244 Index 247.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119418955 20180702
In the last two decades, several promising engineered nanomaterials that combine therapeutic features and imaging functionalities have been presented, but very few have arrived on the market. The purpose of this book is to collect and comprehensively discuss the advances in this current and exciting topic in order to promote and enhance its growth. In the first part, a general introduction about the main features of both organic and inorganic nanomaterials is provided. Then, the most promising and innovative applications for cancer treatment and diagnostic are introduced. In the second part, an analysis of the nanomaterials in the market for healthcare applications is presented. The issue of unwanted accumulation of metals in organisms after the designed action is then discussed. Finally, the most recent progresses in the design of nanomaterials that are able to escape from organisms after the selected action are comprehensively described, and the perspectives of this exciting field provided.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119418955 20180702
Book
1 online resource.
Book
1 online resource (xiv, 212 pages) : illustrations (some color).
Book
1 online resource.
  • Front Cover; Biomedical Applications of Functionalized Nanomaterials; Biomedical Applications of Functionalized Nanomaterials; Copyright; Contents; List of Contributors; Preface; REFERENCES; 1
  • From the â#x80; #x9C; Magic Bulletâ#x80; #x9D; to Advanced Nanomaterials for Active Targeting in Diagnostics and Therapeutics; 1. PAUL EHRLICH AND THE â#x80; #x9C; MAGIC BULLETâ#x80; #x9D; ; 2. PASSIVE VERSUS ACTIVE TARGETING IN CANCER AS MODEL; 2.1 SUGARS; 2.2 TRANSFERRIN AND LACTOFERRIN; 2.3 FOLIC ACID; 2.4 HYALURONIC ACID; 2.5 ANTIBODIES; 2.6 APTAMERS; 3. EMERGING CHALLENGES AND PERSPECTIVES; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; REFERENCES
  • I
  • Ligand Selection and Functionalization of Nanomaterials2
  • Conjugation Chemistry Principles and Surface Functionalization of Nanomaterials; 1. CONJUGATION CHEMISTRY IN THE CONTEXT OF BIOMEDICAL NANOMATERIALS; 2. CONJUGATION CHEMISTRY PRINCIPLES; 2.1 AMINE REACTIONS; 2.1.1 Amide Bond Formation: Strategies; 2.1.1.1 Acyl Halides; 2.1.1.2 Acyl Azides; 2.1.1.3 Acylimidazoles; 2.1.1.4 Anhydrides; 2.1.1.5 O-Acylisourea Using Carbodiimides as Coupling Reagents; 2.1.1.6 Active Esters; 2.1.1.7 Staudinger Ligation; 2.1.1.8 Microwave Activation; 2.1.2 Phosphoramidate Formation: Strategies
  • 2.2 THIOL REACTIONS2.2.1 Thioether Bond Formation: Addition of Thiols at Multiple Bonds of Unsaturated Compounds; 2.2.2 Disulfide Bridge; 2.3 HYDROXYL REACTIONS; 2.3.1 Ester Bond Formation: Strategies; 2.3.1.1 Acyl Halides, Anhydrides, and O-Acylisoureas via Carbodiimide Coupling; 2.3.1.2 Mitsunobu Coupling; 2.3.2 Carbamate Linkage Formation: Strategies; 2.4 CARBOXYLIC ACID REACTIONS; 2.5 ALDEHYDES AND KETONES REACTIONS; 2.6 ALKENES AND ALKYNES; 2.6.1 Dielsâ#x80; #x93; Alder Cycloaddition; 2.6.2 Click Chemistry; 2.6.2.1 Huisgen 1,3-Dipolar Azideâ#x80; #x93; Alkyne Cycloadditions; 2.7 PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS
  • 3. SELF-ASSEMBLED MONOLAYERS AS A POWERFUL TOOL FOR THE DESIGN OFâ#x80; S̄URFACE-ENGINEERED NANOMATERIALS3.1 BIOMOLECULES CONJUGATION ONTO SELF-ASSEMBLED MONOLAYERS VIA COVALENT BINDING; 3.1.1 Maleimide-Terminated Self-Assembled Monolayers; 3.1.2 Alkyne or Azide-Terminated Self-Assembled Monolayersâ#x80; (̄â#x80; #x9C; Click Chemistryâ#x80; #x9D; ); 3.1.3 Carboxylic Acid-Terminated Self-Assembled Monolayers; 3.1.4 Hydroxyl-Terminated Self-Assembled Monolayers; 3.2 BIOMOLECULES CONJUGATION ON SELF-ASSEMBLED MONOLAYERS VIAâ#x80; ĀFFINITY BINDING; 4. CHALLENGES IN (BIO)CONJUGATION; REFERENCES
  • 3
  • Phage Display Technology for Selection of Antibody Fragments1. INTRODUCTION; 2. ANTIBODY PHAGE DISPLAY LIBRARIES; 2.1 ANTIBODIES FROM NAÃ#x8F; VE AND IMMUNE PHAGE DISPLAY LIBRARIES; 2.2 ANTIBODIES FROM SYNTHETIC AND SEMISYNTHETIC PHAGE DISPLAY LIBRARIES; 3. SELECTION AND SCREENING OF ANTIBODY PHAGE DISPLAY LIBRARIES; 4. ANTIBODY ENGINEERING; 4.1 AFFINITY MATURATION OF ANTIBODIES; 4.2 HUMANIZATION OF ANTIBODIES; 5. CONCLUSIONS AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES; REFERENCES; 4
  • Ribosome Display Technology for Selecting Peptide and Protein Ligands; 1. INTRODUCTION
Biomedical Applications of Functionalized Nanomaterials: Concepts, Development and Clinical Translation presents a concise overview of the most promising nanomaterials functionalized with ligands for biomedical applications. The first section focuses on current strategies for identifying biological targets and screening of ligand to optimize anchoring to nanomaterials, providing the foundation for the remaining parts. Section Two covers specific applications of functionalized nanomaterials in therapy and diagnostics, highlighting current practice and addressing major challenges, in particular, case studies of successfully developed and marketed functionalized nanomaterials. The final section focuses on regulatory issues and clinical translation, providing a legal framework for their use in biomedicine. This book is an important reference source for worldwide drug and medical devices policymakers, biomaterials scientists and regulatory bodies.
Book
1 online resource.
  • List of Contributors xi Preface xv Acknowledgments xvii Section 1 Introduction to Biosensors, Recognition Elements, Biomarkers, and Nanomaterials 1 1 General Introduction to Biosensors and Recognition Receptors 3Frank Davis and Zeynep Altintas 1.1 Introduction to Biosensors 3 1.2 Enzyme- Based Biosensors 4 1.3 DNA- and RNA-Based Biosensors 5 1.4 Antibody-Based Biosensors 7 1.5 Aptasensors 8 1.6 Peptide-Based Biosensors 10 1.7 MIP-Based Biosensor 11 1.8 Conclusions 12 References 13 2 Biomarkers in Health Care 17Adama Marie Sesay, Pirkko Tervo, and Elisa Tikkanen 2.1 Introduction 17 2.2 Biomarkers 18 2.2.1 Advantage and Utilization of Biomarkers 18 2.2.2 Ideal Characteristics of Biomarkers 19 2.3 Biological Samples and Biomarkers 20 2.4 Personalized Health and Point-of-Care Technology 22 2.5 Use of Biomarkers in Biosensing Technology 24 2.6 Biomarkers in Disease Diagnosis 26 2.7 Conclusions 29 References 30 3 The Use of Nanomaterials and Microfluidics in Medical Diagnostics 35Jon Ashley and Yi Sun 3.1 Introduction 35 3.2 Nanomaterials in Medical Diagnostics (Bottom-Up Approach) 36 3.2.1 Carbon Nanomaterials 37 3.2.2 Metallic Nanoparticles 39 3.2.2.1 Quantum Dots 39 3.2.2.2 Magnetic Nanoparticles (Fe2O3, FeO, and Fe3O4) 41 3.2.2.3 Gold Nanoparticles 41 3.2.2.4 Silver Nanoparticles 42 3.2.2.5 Nanoshells 42 3.2.2.6 Nanocages 43 3.2.2.7 Nanowires 43 3.2.3 Polymer-Based Nanoparticles 44 3.3 Application of Microfluidic Devices in Clinical Diagnostics (Top-Down Approach) 45 3.3.1 Unique Features of Microfluidic Devices 45 3.3.2 Applications of Microfluidic Devices in Medical Diagnostics 46 3.3.2.1 Types of Microfluidic POC Devices 47 3.3.2.2 Benchtop Microfluidic Instruments 47 3.3.2.3 Small, Lightweight Microfluidic Devices 49 3.3.2.4 Simple Un-instrumented Microfluidic Systems 50 3.4 Integration of Microfluidics with Nanomaterials 52 3.5 Future Perspectives of Nanomaterial and Microfluidic-Based Diagnostics 53 References 54 Section 2 Biosensor Platforms for Disease Detection and Diagnostics 59 4 SPR-Based Biosensor Technologies in Disease Detection and Diagnostics 61Zeynep Altintas and Wellington M. Fakanya 4.1 Introduction 61 4.2 Basic Theoretical Principles 63 4.3 SPR Applications in Disease Detection and Diagnostics 66 4.3.1 SPR Biosensors in Cancer Detection 66 4.3.2 SPR Sensors in Cardiac Disease Detection 68 4.3.3 SPR Sensors in Infectious Disease Detection 71 4.4 Conclusions 72 References 74 5 Piezoelectric-Based Biosensor Technologies in Disease Detection and Diagnostics 77Zeynep Altintas and Noor Azlina Masdor 5.1 Introduction 77 5.2 QCM Biosensors 78 5.3 Disease Diagnosis Using QCM Biosensors 80 5.3.1 Cancer Detection Using QCM Biosensors 82 5.3.2 Cardiovascular System Disorder Detection Using Biosensors 85 5.3.3 Pathogenic Disease Detection Using QCM Biosensors 88 5.4 Conclusions 90 References 91 6 Electrochemical-Based Biosensor Technologies in Disease Detection and Diagnostics 95Andrea Ravalli and Giovanna Marrazza 6.1 Introduction 95 6.2 Electrochemical Biosensors: Definitions, Principles, and Classifications 96 6.3 Biomarkers in Clinical Applications 102 6.3.1 Electrochemical Biosensors for Tumor Markers 102 6.3.2 Electrochemical Biosensors for Cardiac Markers 110 6.3.3 Electrochemical Biosensors for Autoimmune Disease 115 6.3.4 Electrochemical Biosensors for Autoimmune Infectious Disease 116 6.4 Conclusions 118 References 118 7 MEMS-Based Cell Counting Methods 125Mustafa Kangul, Eren Aydin, Furkan Gokce, Ozge Zorlu, Ebru Ozgur, and Haluk Kulah 7.1 Introduction 125 7.2 MEMS-Based Cell Counting Methods 126 7.2.1 Optical Cell Counting Methods 126 7.2.1.1 Quantification of the Cells by Detecting Luminescence 127 7.2.1.2 Quantification of the Cells via High-Resolution Imaging Techniques 130 7.3 Electrical and Electrochemical Cell Counting Methods 131 7.3.1 Impedimetric Cell Quantification 133 7.3.2 Voltammetric and Amperometric Cell Quantification 135 7.4 Gravimetric Cell Counting Methods 136 7.4.1 Deflection-Based Cell Quantification 136 7.4.2 Resonant-Based Cell Quantification 138 7.4.2.1 Theory of the Resonant-Based Sensors 138 7.4.2.2 Actuation and Sensing Methods of Resonators in MEMS Applications 140 7.4.2.3 Resonator Structure Types Used for Cell Detection Applications 145 7.5 Conclusion and Comments 149 References 151 8 Lab-on-a-Chip Platforms for Disease Detection and Diagnosis 155Ziya Isiksacan, Mustafa Tahsin Guler, Ali Kalantarifard, Mohammad Asghari, and Caglar Elbuken 8.1 Introduction 155 8.2 Continuous Flow Platforms 156 8.3 Paper-Based LOC Platforms 161 8.4 Droplet-Based LOC Platforms 166 8.5 Digital Microfluidic-Based LOC Platforms 169 8.6 CD-Based LOC Platforms 172 8.7 Wearable LOC Platforms 174 8.8 Conclusion and Outlook 176 References 177 Section 3 Nanomaterial's Applications in Biosensors and Diagnostics 183 9 Applications of Quantum Dots in Biosensors and Diagnostics 185Zeynep Altintas, Frank Davis, and Frieder W. Scheller 9.1 Introduction 185 9.2 Quantum Dots: Optical Properties, Synthesis, and Surface Chemistry 186 9.3 Biosensor Applications of QDs 187 9.4 Other Biological Applications of QDs 191 9.5 Water Solubility and Cytotoxicity 194 9.6 Conclusion 196 References 197 10 Applications of Molecularly Imprinted Nanostructures in Biosensors and Diagnostics 201Deniz Aktas-Uygun, Murat Uygun, and Sinan Akgol 10.1 Introduction 201 10.2 Molecular Imprinted Polymers 202 10.3 Imprinting Approaches 204 10.4 Molecularly Imprinted Nanostructures 205 10.5 MIP Biosensors in Medical Diagnosis 207 10.6 Diagnostic Applications of MIP Nanostructures 210 10.7 Conclusions 212 References 213 11 Smart Nanomaterials: Applications in Biosensors and Diagnostics 219Frank Davis, Flavio M. Shimizu, and Zeynep Altintas 11.1 Introduction 219 11.2 Metal Nanoparticles 221 11.3 Magnetic Nanoparticles 226 11.4 Carbon Nanotubes 231 11.5 Graphene 235 11.6 Nanostructured Metal Oxides 242 11.7 Nanostructured Hydrogels 247 11.8 Nanostructured Conducting Polymers 254 11.9 Conclusions and Future Trends 260 References 262 12 Applications of Magnetic Nanomaterials in Biosensors and Diagnostics 277Zeynep Altintas 12.1 Introduction 277 12.2 MNP-Based Biosensors for Disease Detection 279 12.3 MNPs in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy 284 12.4 Cellular Applications of MNPs in Biosensing, Imaging, and Therapy 289 12.5 Conclusions 290 References 291 13 Graphene Applications in Biosensors and Diagnostics 297Adina Arvinte and Adama Marie Sesay 13.1 Introduction 297 13.2 Graphene and Biosensors 298 13.2.1 Structure 298 13.2.2 Preparation 299 13.2.3 Properties 301 13.2.4 Commercialization in the Field of Graphene Sensors 302 13.2.5 Latest Developments in Graphene-based Diagnosis 303 13.3 Medical Applications of Graphene 303 13.3.1 Electrochemical Graphene Biosensors for Medical Diagnostics 304 13.3.1.1 Glucose Detection 304 13.3.1.2 Cysteine Detection 307 13.3.1.3 Cholesterol Detection 309 13.3.1.4 Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) 310 13.3.1.5 Glycated Hemoglobin 312 13.3.1.6 Neurotransmitters 312 13.3.1.7 Amyloid-Beta Peptide 315 13.3.2 Electrochemical Graphene Aptasensors 316 13.3.2.1 Nucleic Acids 316 13.3.2.2 Cancer Cell 318 13.3.3 Optical Graphene Sensors for Medical Diagnostics 319 13.4 Conclusions 322 Acknowledgments 322 References 322 Section 4 Organ-Specific Health Care Applications for Disease Cases Using Biosensors 327 14 Optical Biosensors and Applications to Drug Discovery for Cancer Cases 329Zeynep Altintas 14.1 Introduction 329 14.2 Biosensor Technology and Coupling Chemistries 332 14.3 Optical Biosensors for Drug Discovery 335 14.4 Computational Simulations and New Approaches for Drug-Receptor Interactions 341 14.5 Conclusions 343 References 344 15 Biosensors for Detection of Anticancer Drug-DNA Interactions 349Arzum Erdem, Ece Eksin, and Ece Kesici 15.1 Introduction 349 15.2 Electrochemical Techniques 351 15.3 Optical Techniques 356 15.4 Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Technique 358 15.5 QCM Technique 360 15.6 Conclusions 361 Acknowledgments 361 References 361 Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119065012 20171204
Provides a broad range of information from basic principles to advanced applications of biosensors and nanomaterials in health care diagnostics This book utilizes a multidisciplinary approach to provide a wide range of information on biosensors and the impact of nanotechnology on the development of biosensors for health care. It offers a solid background on biosensors, recognition receptors, biomarkers, and disease diagnostics. An overview of biosensor-based health care applications is addressed. Nanomaterial applications in biosensors and diagnostics are included, covering the application of nanoparticles, magnetic nanomaterials, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and molecularly imprinted nanostructures. The topic of organ-specific health care systems utilizing biosensors is also incorporated to provide deep insight into the very recent advances in disease diagnostics. Biosensors and Nanotechnology: Applications in Health Care Diagnostics is comprised of 15 chapters that are presented in four sections and written by 33 researchers who are actively working in Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy, Turkey, Denmark, Finland, Romania, Malaysia and Brazil. It covers biomarkers in healthcare; microfluidics in medical diagnostics; SPR-based biosensor techniques; piezoelectric-based biosensor technologies; MEMS-based cell counting methods; lab-on-chip platforms; optical applications for cancer cases; and more. Discusses the latest technology and advances in the field of biosensors and their applications for healthcare diagnosticsParticular focus on biosensors for cancerSummarizes research of the last 30 years, relating it to state-of-the-art technologies Biosensors and Nanotechnology: Applications in Health Care Diagnostics is an excellent book for researchers, scientists, regulators, consultants, and engineers in the field, as well as for graduate students studying the subject.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119065012 20171204
Book
xix, 354 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
The beginning of the Mexican War of Independence in 1810 triggered radical political, social, and economic changes, including the reorganization of the medical profession. During this tumultuous period of transition, physicians and surgeons merged in an effort to monopolize the field and ensure their professional survival in a postcolonial, liberal republic. Carving a Niche traces the evolution of various medical occupations in Mexico from the end of the colonial period to the beginning of the regime of Porfirio Diaz, demonstrating how competition and collaboration, identity, ever-changing legislation, political instability, and foreign intervention resulted in a complex, gradual, and unique process of medical professionalization - one that neither conformed to theoretical models nor resembled hierarchies found in other parts of the world. Through extensive research, Luz Maria Hernandez Saenz analyzes the uphill struggle of practitioners to claim their place as public health experts and to provide and control medical education in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds. Highlighting the significance of race, class, gender, and nationality, Carving a Niche demonstrates that in the case of Mexico, liberal reforms praised by traditional works often hindered, rather than promoted, the creation of a modern medical profession and the delivery of quality health care services.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773553026 20180530
Green Library
Book
viii, 499 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
This volume completes a trilogy (Lee, 2012, 2017) on the philosophy of medicine, Western and Chinese. Its immediate prequel (Lee, 2017) sets out in general outline the philosophical and methodological core of Classical Chinese Medicine (CCM); this volume fleshes out that "skeleton" by examining in detail its peculiar concepts and characteristics, such as Getihua/Personalised Medicine, Preventive Medicine, Tianren-xiangying (Macro-Micro-cosmic Wholism), Zheng-Fang Wholism (Wholism at the level of diagnosis and treatment), and Mind-Body Wholism (the person as primitive concept). CCM is here shown to instantiate "ecosystem science", which is post-Newtonian in orientation, departing from familiar Newtonian landmarks such as Reductionism and linearity, resting on thing-ontology for a non-reductionist, non-linear science. This approach highlights a rich irony and paradox: namely, how CCM in being backward-looking (relying on classical texts as foundational texts and prescriptions of some two thousand years standing) simultaneously manages to be at the cutting edge of scientific thinking today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781527503977 20180409
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvii, 148 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
268 pages, xvi pages of plates : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 22 cm
  • Préface, Pierre Échinard -- Le médecin histoire d'une vie -- De Grenoble à Marseille -- Les premières années -- Une carrière fulgurante -- Les années noires -- L'aventure égyptienne -- Premières mesures d'urgence -- Abou-Zabel, centre hospitalier et universitaire -- L'hôpital d'Abou-Zabel -- Les ambulances de campagne -- L'École de Médecine d'Abou-Zabel -- Installation des autres Écoles à Abou-Zabel -- Le service de santé de la marine -- La médecine civile -- La vaccination antivariolique -- L'épidémie de choléra de 1831 -- La peste de 1834-1835 -- Le service de santé dans les provinces -- Médecins et charlatans -- Les maladies vénériennes -- Le second souffle -- Premier voyage en Europe -- Transfert de l'hôpital et de l'école de médecine au Caire -- Ministère et commission de l'instruction publique -- Quelques mois de vacances -- La campagne de Syrie -- Retour au Caire -- Deuxième voyage en Europe -- Les dernières années -- L'après Méhémet-Ali -- La disgrâce et le retour à Marseille (1849-1856) -- Deux ans pour reconstruire (1856-1858) -- Une retraite bien méritée -- Un homme aux multiples facettes -- L'homme -- Rigueur et intransigeance -- Un égo surdimensionné -- Une immense générosité -- Des convictions religieuses à toute épreuve -- Fidèle et reconnaissant -- Un parfait homme du monde -- Francs-maçons et saint-simoniens -- Vous avez dit français ? -- Le proche de Méhemet-Ali -- Un despote éclairé -- La reconstruction -- Le bras de fer -- Clot-Bey et la politique: le porte-parole déguisé -- L'homme de science -- Premières prises de position -- Non contagiosité contre contagiosité du choléra et de la peste -- Et bien d'autres maladies -- La vie affective -- Sa mère -- Sa vie sentimentale -- Généreux, mais proche de ses intérêts -- Le collectionneur -- Le jardin botanique -- Le cabinet d'histoire naturelle -- Le collectionneur d'antiquités égyptiennes -- Une collection de monnaies et médailles -- Les honneurs.
"Né à Grenoble en 1793, Antoine-Barthélemy Clot se rend en 1813 à Marseille pour étudier la médecine. Docteur en médecine en 1820 à Montpellier, il est docteur en chirurgie en 1823. Doté d'une forte personnalité, il a déjà été évincé de ses postes hospitaliers et de la Société académique de médecine de Marseille lorsque, en 1825, il est recruté par Tourneau, un Français au service du pacha d'Égypte Méhémet Ali, en tant que médecin et chirurgien en chef de l'armée de ce dernier. Antoine-Barthélemy Clot s'embarque le 21 janvier 1825. Son contrat, prévu pour cinq ans, se prolongera jusqu'en 1849. Clot a été le maître d'oeuvre de la modernisation des institutions médicales égyptiennes. Il crée un Conseil de santé et un service sanitaire militaire, puis fonde un gigantesque complexe hospitalier à Abou-Zabel, ainsi qu'une École de médecine ; il développe la vaccination antivariolique et fonde une École de sages-femmes. Après l'épidémie de choléra de 1832, son dévouement exemplaire lui vaut d'être fait bey par Méhémet Ali. Clot-Bey avait acquis une importante collection d'antiquités égyptiennes, qu'il a cédée à la ville de Marseille. On peut aujourd'hui en admirer les pièces au musée de la Vieille Charité. Cette biographie, qui se fonde sur une documentation exhaustive, retrace la vie de l'homme et du médecin et dresse un portrait nuancé de ce personnage plein de contrastes, qui a contribué à écrire l'une des pages les plus importantes du développement de l'Égypte moderne."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
264 pages : illustrations, maps, charts, facsimiles ; 24 cm
  • Enquête documentaire -- Plan de l'exposé -- Chassé-croisé de deux épidémies, itinéraires de la contagion et réponses institutionnelles : 1816-1900 -- Les manifestations des épidémies -- Chronotopie de la fièvre jaune -- Les fièvres gardiennes des côtes africaines -- La marche cyclique de la fièvre jaune -- Les manifestations du choléra en Sénégambie -- L'épidémie de 1868 -- L'épidémie de 1868-1869 à Saint-Louis -- La première phase dé l'épidémie à Saint-Louis (25 novembre 31 décembre 1868) -- La période d'accalmie (de janvier à juin 1869) -- La troisième phase de l'épidémie à Saint-Louis -- L'épidémie de 1868 dans le reste de la colonie -- L'épidémie dans l'ouest de la vallée du fleuve Sénégal (décembre 1868 mai 1869) -- Le choléra dans le Fouta central et dans le Haut-Fleuve (janvier-juin 1869) -- L'épidémie de choléra de 1893 -- L'épidémie à Saint-Louis et dans les postes et escales du fleuve -- Bilan démographique de l'épidémie -- Facteurs d'éclosion des maladies et discours -- Les facteurs d'éclosion des maladies -- Les facteurs naturels de la dégradation de l'hygiène -- Du poids des sécheresses et des inondations -- Les facteurs socio-économiques -- Les facteurs sociaux -- Les conditions de logement -- L'ouverture de la colonie aux influences extérieures : de la logistique transatlantique au chemin de fer -- Savoir médical et discours social autour du choléra et de la fièvre jaune -- La constitution du savoir médical -- Du discours social -- Les représentations du choléra chez le corps médical français -- Les représentations de la fièvre jaune chez le corps médical français -- Les pastoriens et la fièvre jaune -- L'impact des épidémies sur la colonie -- L'impact économique -- La crise économique et le déficit de la production agricole, 1868 -- La guerre de la gomme -- La crise financière : ajournement des rentrées de recettes fiscales -- Les conséquences politiques -- Le choléra et la propagande politico-religieuse -- L'émigration, une forme de contestation politique -- La résurgence des mouvements messianiques en 1868 -- La guerre sainte des Madyankés -- Les réponses du pouvoir colonial -- Les infrastructures -- L'hôpital militaire de Saint-Louis -- L'hospice civil de Saint-Louis -- Les infrastructures de Dakar et de Gorée -- Le laboratoire de microbiologie -- La mise en fonctionnement de rouages institutionnels -- Le Conseil de Santé -- Les commissions sanitaires -- Les conseils d'hygiène et de salubrité publique -- L'élaboration d'un cadre réglementaire -- Des décrets pour contrôler les frontières -- Un dispositif de contrôle administratif -- Réactions des indigènes aux mesures sanitaires -- Les autres mesures de lutte -- L'exemple de Saint-Louis -- Cas de Dakar -- Les mesures de lutte contre l'épidémie -- Le traitement du choléra en 1893 -- La fièvre jaune en question : discours et pratiques des élites coloniales (1900-1960) -- Les manifestations de la fièvre jaune en 1900 et 1927 -- L'épidémie de 1900 -- Un terrain favorable -- Géographie de l'épidémie de 1900 -- Les mesures de défense -- L'épidémie de 1927 -- Géographie de l'épidémie -- Les mesures de défense
  • Les répercussions des épidémies -- Désertion et évitement : l'affaire Chaudié -- La presse "métropolitaine" et le traitement de l'épidémie de 1927 -- Idéologies coloniales ou figures et représentations de la victime -- Immobilisme scientifique en France et aux colonies -- La recherche médicale en panne -- La remise en cause des certitudes -- L'ébranlement du mythe de l'immunité raciale du Noir -- Les réponses médicales et politiques -- La recherche médicale -- Les efforts concertés -- La mission du Sénégal -- La mission sanitaire de Rio de Janeiro -- La Conférence africaine intercoloniale sur la fièvre jaune, 1928 -- Une nouvelle piste : le savoir indigène interrogé par l'Administration, 1932 -- Connaissance indigène de la maladie -- Les traitements de la maladie -- Les instruments de la politique sanitaire : les institutions scientifiques et techniques -- Création d'un enseignement médical spécialisé -- Le transfert à Dakar du laboratoire de microbiologie -- L'hôpital central indigène et l'Institut d'Hygiène sociale -- La réorganisation du Service de Santé -- La lutte contre le moustique -- Les mesures d'ordre administratif -- Le financement de la santé -- Le programme d'assainissement -- Le temps de la victimisation : le Noir comme réservoir de virus (1927-1960) -- La surveillance des Noirs -- Les Syriens, de nouveaux boucs émissaires -- Vaccin et vaccination antiamarile au Sénégal (1927-1952) -- La longue marche vers la découverte d'un vaccin -- La fausse piste : le vaccin de Noguchi -- La première révolution : le remplacement du Macacus rhesus par la souris et les tests de séro-protection -- Le stade expérimental du vaccin : les cobayes humains -- La reconnaissance de la validité scientifique du vaccin français sur le plan international -- Les effets bénéfiques de la vaccination -- Les vaccinations réalisées en AOF de 1934 à 1952 -- Les moyens de l'imposition de la vaccination -- Le "rideau biologique" contre la fièvre jaune -- Contrôle de l'espace et de la société -- De la séparation de l'habitat à la ségrégation raciale -- La partition administrative : Dakar séparée de la colonie -- La lutte antistégomyenne dans la presqu'île du Cap-Vert -- Une zone d'exclusion d'endémicité amarile : une fuite en avant ? -- Le projet de délimitation -- L'exécution du projet -- Le contrôle du port -- Le contrôle de l'aéroport.
"Les épidémies de fièvre jaune et de choléra ont eu une influence considérable sur la vie politique et sociale de la colonie du Sénégal. Comme un coup de projecteur, elles ont fait resurgir à la surface des problèmes sociopolitiques latents. Elles ont permis également de mieux cerner la dynamique de la médecine coloniale, de comprendre les stratégies et les politiques sanitaires mises en oeuvre dans le cadre du projet colonial. La transplantation de la médecine occidentale dans un milieu particulièrement morbide s'est heurtée à plusieurs difficultés, notamment les conflits d'intérêt entre les groupes sociaux (commerçants, indigènes, politiciens et techniciens de la santé). La pluralité des recours thérapeutiques et la négation des pratiques indigènes par l'administration coloniale ont également été une constante dans l'implantation de la nouvelle médecine. Cet ouvrage est une réflexion novatrice sur le cheminement de la pensée médicale et des stratégies politiques coloniales. Il s'inscrit dans le courant de l'histoire sociale, en privilégiant les interactions entre groupes sociaux et leurs rapports à la santé. La célébration de l'élite médicale et des innovations scientifiques cède la place à de larges mises en contexte qui intègrent, outre l'état des connaissances et de la pratique médicales, les dimensions économiques, politiques, sociales et culturelles de la santé. L'analyse du discours des élites permet de mettre à jour les connaissances sur les idéologies coloniales ainsi que sur la perception culturelle de la maladie chez les différents groupes sociaux. Le présent livre dévoile en définitive dans toute sa splendeur, les ressorts de la bio-politique et de l'ordre colonial."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 368 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm.
  • Part IChapter 1. PrologueChapter 2. The Context of Health Communication: Global, Local and TheoreticalPart II.Chapter 3. Methodological Issues: Approaches, Pitfalls and SolutionsPart III.Chapter 4. Islands of Good PracticeChapter 5. Language Diversity in the Clinic: Promoting and Exploring Cultural BrokerageChapter 6. Verbal and Non-Verbal Dimensions of the Intercultural Health SettingPart IV.Chapter 7. Putting It All Into Practice: Some Examples and AdviceChapter 8. Conclusions and Implications: Paradoxes and Principles.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137580993 20180403
This book offers a novel approach to understanding the complexities of communication in culturally and linguistically diverse health care contexts. It marks the culmination of two decades of research in South Africa, a context that has obvious application in a wider international climate given current globalization and migration trends. The authors draw from a large body of evidence based across different sites and illnesses, scrutinising both the language dynamics of intercultural health interactions and the perceptions and narratives of multiple participants. Including a range of theoretical, methodological and empirical considerations, the volume sheds light upon qualitative research methods and their application in the intercultural context. This book will be a valuable resource for health professionals, medical educators and language practitioners as well as students and scholars of discourse analysis and the medical humanities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137580993 20180403
Green Library
Book
xxvii, 384 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Foreword to the second edition-- Joe Lambert. Foreword to the first edition-- Angela Coulter.- Patient Voices: in celebration-- Monica Clarke. Preface-- Pip Hardy and Tony Sumner. Acknowledgements. Section 1: A Tale of Two Decades. Chapter 1: Introduction: the Journey Begins-- Pip Hardy and Tony Sumner. Chapter 2: Pilgrims' Progress-- Pip Hardy. Chapter 3: To the Far Horizon-- Pip Hardy and Tony Sumner. Chapter 4: The Patient Voices Approach-- Pip Hardy and Tony Sumner. Section 2: Involvement, Impact and Improvement. Chapter 5: Towards Compassionate Governance: the Impact of Patient Voices on NHS Leadership-- Paul Stanton. Chapter 6: Arthur and Co: Digital Stories about Living with Arthritis-- Fiona O'Neill. Chapter 7: Safety Stories: Creating a Culture of Safety with Digital Stories-- Cathy Jaynes. Chapter 8: Working with Dignity and Respect: Improving Mental Health Services with Digital Storytelling-- Carol Haigh, Patrick Cahoon and Tony Sumner. Chapter 9: Breathe Easy: Digital Stories about COPD-- Matthew Hodson. Section 3: Transformational Learning. Chapter 10: Reflection - They Just Don't Get It! Digital Stories from Junior Doctors-- Liz Anderson and Dan Kinnair.- Chapter 11: Reflection - Now We Get It!-- Steve Corry-Bass, Matthew Critchfield and Weehaan Pang. Chapter 12: The Shock of Reality: Digital Storytelling with Newly Qualified Nurses-- Gemma Stacey. Section 4: How Was That For You? The Healing Power of Digital Storytelling. Chapter 13: Healing Journeys: Digital Storytelling with Service User Educators-- Julie Walters. Chapter 14: The Sheffield Carers' Voices Project: Was it Therapeutic?-- Mark Shea. Chapter 15: Building Healthy Teams: Digital Storytelling in NHS Organisations-- Amy Stabler. Section 5: Contributing to Evidence (the Evidence of Experience). Chapter 16: Measuring what Counts: the Stories Behind the Statistics-- Karen Taylor. Chapter 17: What Really Matters to Patients?-- Digital Storytelling as Qualitative Research-- Carol Haigh and Eula Miller.- Chapter 18: Increasing Empathy: Digital Storytelling in Professional Development-- Nick Harland. Section 6: Doing It Together: A Model for Co-production. Chapter 19: Finding our Voices in the Dangling Conversations: Co-producing Digital Stories about Dementia-- Rosie Stenhouse and Jo Tait. Chapter 20: Service Users and Staff Learning Together with Digital Stories-- Elspeth McLean. Chapter 21: Cultivating Compassion in End of Life Care: Developing an Interprofessional Learning Resource Based on Digital Stories-- Pip Hardy and Elizabeth Howkins. Chapter 22: The DNA of Care: Digital Storytelling with NHS Staff-- Karen Deeny, Pip Hardy and Tony Sumner. Chapter 23: All the Stories Are One: Care, Compassion and Transformation-- Pip Hardy and Tony Sumner.- Afterword-- Maxine Craig.â .
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319641454 20180430
This book explores how digital storytelling can catalyze change in healthcare. Edited by the co-founders of the award-winning Patient Voices Programme, the authors discuss various applications for this technique; from using digital storytelling as a reflective process, to the use of digital stories in augmenting quantitative data. Through six main sections this second edition covers areas including healthcare education, patient engagement, quality improvement and the use of digital storytelling research. The chapters illuminate how digital storytelling can lead to greater humanity, understanding and, ultimately, compassion. This collection will appeal to those involved in delivering, managing or receiving healthcare and healthcare education and research, as well as people interested in digital storytelling and participatory media.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319641454 20180430
Green Library
Book
1 online resource : illustrations.
  • 1. Development of environmentally benign polymer doped silver nanoparticles and the study of their antimicrobial activity in combination with Methicillin 2. Nanostructures for modulation of microbial biofilm 3. Metal oxide nanoparticles for antimicrobial therapy 4. Iron oxide/oleic acid magnetic nanoparticles bearing lipid-like choline derivatives: synthesis, morphology, antitumour and antimicrobial properties 5. Issues and challenges in the use of silver nanoparticles as antimicrobial agent 6. Nano silver compounds in the research of new antimicrobial agents against eskape pathogens 7. Microbially synthesized nanoparticles as next generation antimicrobials - Scope and applications 8. Potential of encapsulated phenolics in hydrogel particles 9. Nanotechnological approaches for colon specific drug delivery for modulating the quorum sensing of gut-associated pathogens 10. Pharmaceutical nanotechnology in the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections 11. Biosynthesis of silica nanoparticles by Fusariumoxysporum and Lactobacillus sp. and antimicrobial activity against biofilm forming mrsa 12. Bio and phytochemical mediated synthesis of different metal nanoparticles for possible antimicrobial applications 13. Synergising Nanotherapy with immunomodulation for Infectious disease therapy 14. Nanostructures for improved delivery of antibiotics 15. Metal nanoparticles as potent antimicrobial nanomachetes with emphasis on nanogold and nanosilver.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128136676 20180514
Design of Nanostructures for Versatile Therapeutic Applications focuses on antimicrobial, antioxidant and nutraceutical applications of nanostructured materials. Many books discuss these subjects, but not from a pharmaceutical point-of-view. This book covers novel approaches related to the modulation of microbial biofilms, antimicrobial therapy and encapsulate polyphenols as antioxidants. Written by an internationally diverse group of academics, this book is an important reference resource for researchers, both in biomaterials science and the pharmaceutical industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128136676 20180514
Book
xv, 147 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface Introduction Chapter 1: An Overview of the Debate Chapter 2: Kant's Conception of Dignity and How it Fails to Capture Survivors' Claims of Harm Chapter 3: On Finding an Adequate Conception of Dignity Chapter 4: Trauma, the Self, and Controlling the Nazi Data Chapter 5: Nazi Data: Transparent, Evil, and Transparently Evil Chapter 6: Epistemic Injustice and the Survivors' Claims to Moral Expertise Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498550024 20180416
In this work, Carol V.A. Quinn (re)constructs the survivors' arguments in the debate concerning the ethics of using Nazi medical data, showing what it would mean to take their claims seriously. She begins with a historical case and presents arguments that help make sense of the following claims: 1) Using the data harms the survivors by violating their dignity; 2) The survivors are the "living data, " and so when we use the data we use them; 3) The data is really, not merely symbolically, evil and we become morally tainted when we engage it; and 4) The survivors are the real moral experts in this debate, and so we should take seriously what they say. Quinn's approach is interdisciplinary, incorporating philosophy, psychology, trauma research, survivors' testimony, Holocaust poetry, literature, and the Hebrew Bible.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498550024 20180416
Green Library