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Book
11 pages : color illustrations, color portraits ; 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
150 pages ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
iv, 243 pages : illustrations (color) ; 26 cm.
Study on diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy according to Tibetan traditional medicane.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 254 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Blakely, Georgia
  • Morehouse College
  • Medical student
  • The kamikaze school of medicine
  • Professor
  • An offer
  • Founding dean
  • Morehouse School of Medicine
  • President Bush calls
  • Mr. Secretary
  • Reforming health care
  • Morehouse, a model black institution
  • Missing persons.
While Louis W. Sullivan was a student at Morehouse College, Morehouse president Benjamin Mays said something to the student body that stuck with him for the rest of his life. "The tragedy of life is not failing to reach our goals, " Mays said "It is not having goals to reach." In Breaking Ground, Sullivan recounts his extraordinary life beginning with his childhood in Jim Crow south Georgia and continuing through his trailblazing endeavors training to become a physician in an almost entirely white environment in the Northeast, founding and then leading the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, and serving as secretary of Health and Human Services in President George H. W. Bush's administration. Throughout this extraordinary life Sullivan has passionately championed both improved health care and increased access to medical professions for the poor and people of colour. At five years old, Louis Sullivan declared to his mother that he wanted to be a doctor. Given the harsh segregation in Blakely, Georgia, and its lack of adequate schools for African Americans at the time, his parents sent Louis and his brother, Walter, to Savannah and later Atlanta, where greater educational opportunities existed for blacks. After attending Booker T. Washington High School and Morehouse College, Sullivan went to medical school at Boston University - he was the sole African American student in his class. He eventually became the chief of hematology there until Hugh Gloster, the president of Morehouse College, presented him with an opportunity he couldn't refuse: Would Sullivan be the founding dean of Morehouse's new medical school? He agreed and went on to create a state-of-the-art institution dedicated to helping poor and minority students become doctors. During this period he established long-lasting relationships with George H. W. and Barbara Bush that would eventually result in his becoming the secretary of Health and Human Services in 1989. Sullivan details his experiences in Washington dealing with the burgeoning AIDS crisis, PETA activists, and antismoking efforts, along with his efforts to push through comprehensive health care reform decades before the Affordable Care Act. Along the way his interactions with a cast of politicos, including Thurgood Marshall, Jack Kemp, Clarence Thomas, Jesse Helms, and the Bushes, capture vividly a particular moment in recent history. Sullivan's life - from Morehouse to the White House and his ongoing work with medical students in South Africa - is the embodiment of the hopes and progress that the civil rights movement fought to achieve. His story should inspire future generations - of all backgrounds - to aspire to great things.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780820346632 20160614
Green Library
Book
xxx, 304 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 30 cm
Published in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, this book provides more than an institutional history. Rich with anecdotes and personality, Dora Calott Wang's account is a must-read for anyone curious about health care in New Mexico. Celebrated for its innovations in medical curricula, UNM's medical school began as an audacious experiment by pioneering educators who were determined to create a great medical school in a state beset by endemic poverty and daunting geographic barriers. Wang traces the enactment of the school's mission to provide medical education for New Mexicans and to help alleviate the severe shortage of medical care throughout the state. The Daily Practice of Compassion offers a primer for policy makers in medical education and health-care delivery throughout the country.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826355256 20160618
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
v, 466 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 372 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Nearly two-thirds of the Civil War's approximately 750,000 fatalities were caused by disease--a staggering fact for which the American medical profession was profoundly unprepared. In the years before the war, training for physicians in the United States was mostly unregulated, and medical schools' access to cadavers for teaching purposes was highly restricted. Shauna Devine argues that in spite of these limitations, Union army physicians rose to the challenges of the war, undertaking methods of study and experimentation that would have a lasting influence on the scientific practice of medicine. Though the war's human toll was tragic, conducting postmortems on the dead and caring for the wounded gave physicians ample opportunity to study and develop new methods of treatment and analysis, from dissection and microscopy to new research into infectious disease processes. Examining the work of doctors who served in the Union Medical Department, Devine sheds new light on how their innovations in the midst of crisis transformed northern medical education and gave rise to the healing power of modern health science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469611556 20160614
Green Library
Book
ix, 435 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements Introduction Part 1: Health Transitions 1. China's Exceptional Health Transitions: Overcoming the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse / Lincoln Chen and Chen Ling 2. Changing Patterns of Diseases and Longevity: The evolution of health in 20th century Beijing / Zhang Daqing 3. Maternal and Child Health in Nineteenth- to Twenty-first-Century China / Yi-li Wu and Tina Johnson 4. Tobacco Smoking and Health in Twentieth-Century China / Carol Benedict Part 2: Disease Transitions 5. Epidemics and Public Health in Twentieth-Century China / Yu Xinzhong 6. Schistosomiasis / Miriam Gross and Fan Ka Wai 7. Tuberculosis control in Shanghai: bringing health to the masses, 1928-present / Rachel Core 8. The Development of Psychiatric Services in China: Christianity, Communism and Community / Veronica Pearson Part 3: Adaptations and Innovations 9. Foreign Models of Medicine in Twentieth-Century China: Part One / Gao Xi 10. John B. Grant: Public Health and State Medicine / Bu Liping 11. The Influence of War on China's Modern Health Systems / Nicole Barnes and John Watt 12. The Institutionalization of Chinese Medicine / Volker Scheid and Sean Hsiang-lin Lei 13. Barefoot doctors and the provision of rural health care / Fang Xiaoping Part 4: Professional Transitions 14. A Case Study of Transnational Flows of Chinese Medical Professionals: China Medical Board and Rockefeller Foundation Fellows / Mary Brown Bullock 15. The Development of Modern Nursing in China / Sonya Grypma and Zhen Cheng 16. The Evolution of the Hospital in Twentieth-Century China / Michelle Renshaw Conclusion Appendix: Timeline Notes General Bibliography Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253014900 20160617
This volume examines important aspects of China's century-long search to provide appropriate and effective health care for its people. Four subjects - disease and healing, encounters and accommodations, institutions and professions, and people's health - organize discussions across case studies of schistosomiasis, tuberculosis, mental health, and tobacco and health. Among the book's significant conclusions are the importance of barefoot doctors in disseminating western medicine, the improvements in medical health and services during the long Sino-Japanese war, and the important role of the Chinese consumer. Intended for an audience of health practitioners, historians, and others interested in the history of medicine and health in China, the book is one of three commissioned by the Chinese Medical Board to mark its centennial in 2014.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253014900 20160617
Green Library
Book
502 pages : charts ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
iii, 35 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
59 pages : illustrations (color), color map ; 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 400 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm
  • Telling My Mother's Story
  • A Young Doctor in Occupied Lodz
  • Becoming a Doctor
  • Anna Maria Hospital
  • Doctoring in Litzmannstadt
  • The Shadow of the Ghetto
  • Resistance and Rescue
  • Women's Prison on Gdanska Street
  • In the Camps
  • "Treated Like an Animal"
  • Zugang in Ravensbruck
  • The Camps of Gross-Rosen
  • Neusalz Slave Labor Camp
  • Slave Doctor
  • Death March
  • Flossenburg and the End of War
  • Surviving Survival
  • Displaced Person
  • Refugee Doctor
  • Reclaiming the Past
  • "Beginning a New Book"
  • Shattered Dreams
  • Returns and Departures
  • One Hundred Years
Green Library
Book
1 volume [various paging] ; 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 375 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Plates follow page 1. The Monarch of Public Health Part One. Rise, 1871 1948 2. Coming to Power 3. War and Prominence 4. The Best Seller Part Two. Decline, 1949 1980 5. The Quicksand Bureaucracy 6. They Are Giving the Public Health Service Away!" 7. Bossed Around Part Three. Struggle, 1981 2001 8. Resurrection 9. Drawn as Villains 10. You're on Your Own" Part Four. Plummet, 2002 Present 11. MIA 12. America's Doctor" 13. The Surgeon General's Demise Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520272293 20160616
What does it mean to be the nation's doctor? In this engaging narrative, journalist Mike Stobbe examines the Office of the U.S. Surgeon General, emphasizing that it has always been unique within the federal government in its ability to influence public health. But now, in their efforts to provide leadership in public health policy, surgeons general compete with other high-profile figures such as the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services and the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Furthermore, in an era of declining budgets, when public health departments have eliminated tens of thousands of jobs, some argue that a lower-profile and ineffective surgeon general is a waste of money. By tracing stories of how surgeons general like Luther Terry, C. Everett Koop, and Joycelyn Elders created policies and confronted controversy in response to issues like smoking, AIDS, and masturbation, Stobbe highlights how this office is key to shaping the nation's health and explailns why its decline is harming our national well-being.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520272293 20160616
Green Library
Book
79 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 219 pages ; 23 cm.
Women physicians in nineteenth-century America faced a unique challenge in gaining acceptance to the medical field as it began its transformation into a professional institution. The profession had begun to increasingly insist on masculine traits as signs of competency. Not only were these traits inaccessible to women according to nineteenth-century gender ideology, but showing competence as a medical professional was not enough. Whether women could or should be physicians hinged mostly on maintaining their femininity while displaying the newly established standard traits of successful practitioners of medicine. Women Physicians and Professional Ethos provides a unique example of how women influenced both popular and medical discourse. This volume is especially notable because it considers the work of African American and American Indian women professionals. Drawing on a range of books, articles, and speeches, Carolyn Skinner analyses the rhetorical practices of nineteenth-century American women physicians. She redefines ethos in a way that reflects the persuasive efforts of women who claimed the authority and expertise of the physician with great difficulty. Descriptions of ethos have traditionally been based on masculine communication and behaviour, leaving women's rhetorical situations largely unaccounted for. Skinner's feminist model considers the constraints imposed by material resources and social position, the reciprocity between speaker and audience, the effect of one rhetor's choices on the options available to others, the connections between ethos and genre, the potential for ethos to be developed and used collectively by similarly situated people, and the role ethos plays in promoting social change. Extending recent theorisations of ethos as a spatial, ecological, and potentially communal concept, Skinner identifies nineteenth-century women physicians' rhetorical strategies and outlines a feminist model of ethos that gives readers a more nuanced understanding of how this mode of persuasion operates for all speakers and writers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809333004 20160612
Green Library
Book
39 pages, : charts ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 331 p.
Book
78 pages : color illustration ; 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 456 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The functional realism of medicine
  • Modalities of science : narrative, phronesis, and the skills of medicine
  • The chief concern of medicine : narrative knowledge and schema-based practice
  • The logic of diagnosis : peirce, literary narrative, and the history of present illness
  • The patient-physician relationship : the scene of narration
  • The patient's story : the apprehension of narration
  • Doctors listening and attending to patients : response and engagement with acts of narration
  • Narrative and medicine : schemas of narration
  • Narrative and everyday medical ethics : schemas of action
  • Reading the death of Ivan Ilych.
Green Library