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Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 215 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: inequality for all
  • Feathers, wings, and souls
  • The creaturely continuum in A midsummer night's dream
  • The lively creaturely/object world of The rape of Lucrece
  • Falstaff and "the modern constitution"
  • The winter's tale's pedestrian and elite creatures
  • Human grandiosity/ human responsibility.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (1 volume) : illustrations
  • 1. Legal and Ethical Considerations 2. Locating the News 3. Developing Stories 4. Collecting Information from Real and Virtual Documents 5. Beats, Spot News, and Reporting Assignments 6. Newswriting Mechanics 7. Newswriting Style 8. Writing Compelling Leads 9. Fieldwork 10. Interviewing 11. Covering Planned Events 12. Reporting Live 13. Voiceovers, Packages, and Story Formats 14. Producing the Television Newscast 15. Producing the Radio Newscast 16. Delivering the News 17. Careers in Broadcast Journalism 18. Portfolio Development.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138207486 20170821
Broadcast News Writing, Reporting, and Producing, Seventh Edition is the leading book covering all aspects of writing and reporting the news. It identifies the key concepts and terms readers need to know in the news gathering and dissemination process, and provides practical, real-world advice for operating in the modern day newsroom. New to the Seventh Edition are profiles of working journalists who give readers a glimpse into the working life of modern reporters, producers, and directors. This new edition also covers important aspects of the use of social media, drone journalism, and digital technology. A new chapter on portfolio development will assist readers in developing the skills to advance in their careers. The text has also been updated to reflect new industry standards in modes of information gathering and delivery, writing style, and technology. Additional features include: * Key words at the start of every chapter, identifying important terms and definitions * End of chapter Summaries, which allows readers to review the chapter's main points * Text Your Knowledge, which helps readers quiz themselves on important concepts * Readers can apply a chapter's themes with chapter-by-chapter Exercises * A companion website featuring video tutorials of necessary skillsets for journalists, including lighting structures, how to hold a microphone, and how to properly conduct an interview.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138207486 20170821
Book
xviii, 412 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Petersen's Troy : reimagining Homeric heroes
  • Resinging The odyssey : myth and myth making in the O brother, where art thou?
  • What is old is newish again : Hercules
  • Clash of the titans, Wrath of the titans : altered prototypes and Aeschylean, Wagnerian dimensions
  • Theseus in the immortals : an ideal hero for a rough age
  • Blooming maiden and fertile goddess : the myths of Pan's labyrinth
  • The perils of oppression : the myth of Medea in Arturo Ripstein Such is life
  • Gaze, knowledge, snakes, and riddles : Harry Potter and the chamber of secrets as foundation myth
  • Arrows, roots, bread, and song : mythical aspects of the Hunger games
  • Percy Jackson and the Olympians : the Lightening Thief : an American parody of the Hero's journey
  • Lars and the Real Girl and the Pygmalion myth : trauma, community, and desire
  • Ruby Sparks : rereading Pygmalion and Narcissus.
Green Library
Book
133 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Linguistic background : semantics and pragmatics
  • Linguistic relativity: Sapir, Whorf, and kinship
  • Culture as shared differentially distributed pragmatic knowledge
  • Cognitive structures and social units
  • Prototype-extension view of concepts
  • Kinds of collective cognitive structures I
  • Kinds of collective cognitive structures II : cultural models of action
  • Individual knowledge and individual use of cultural knowledge
  • Cultural models, methods and empirical data.
"A particular culture is associated with a particular community, and thus has a social dimension. But how does culture operate and how is it to be defined? Is it to be taken as the behavioral repertoire of members of that community, as the products of their behavior, or as the shared mental content that produces the behavior? Is it to be viewed as a coherent whole or only a collection of disparate parts? Culture is shared, but how totally? How is culture learned and maintained over time, and how does it change? In Culture as a system, Kronenfeld adopts a cognitive approach to culture to offer answers to these questions. Combining insights from cognitive psychology and linguistic anthropology with research on collective knowledge systems, he offers an understanding of culture as a collectively held pragmatic cognitive system. The cognitive system is shown to be behavioral as well as linguistic, and, in addition to intellectual knowledge, involves expectations about peoples' feelings, attitudes, and behaviors. He argues that the need for effectiveness in communication and joint action in novel situations requires the system to be productive: that society's division of labor requires knowledge to be distributed differentially across the population, but still systematically integrated. Engagingly written, it is essential reading for scholars and graduate students of cognitive anthropology, linguistic anthropology, sociology of culture, philosophy, and computational cognitive science"--Abstract.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (1 volume) : illustrations
  • Part One: INTRODUCTION Chapter 1: Introduction to Film Language and GrammarChapter 2: Introduction to the Dramatic Elements Embedded in the ScreenplayChapter 3: Organizing Action in a Dramatic SceneChapter 4: StagingChapter 5: CameraChapter 6: Camera in NOTORIOUS Patio Scene Part Two: MAKING YOUR FILM Chapter 7: Detective Work On ScriptsChapter 8: Staging and Camera For The Piece Of Apple PieChapter 9: Marking Shooting Script With Camera SetupsChapter 10: Work With ActorsChapter 11: Managerial Responsibilities of the DirectorChapter 12: Postproduction Part Three: ORGANIZING ACTION IN AN ACTION SCENE Chapter 13: Staging and Camera for Over Easy Action Scene Part Four: ORGANIZING ACTION IN A NARRATIVE SCENE Chapter 14: Staging and Camera for Wanda Narrative Scene Part Five: LEARNING THE CRAFT THROUGH FILM ANALYSIS Chapter 15: Alfred Hitchcock's Notorious Chapter 16: Peter Weir's The Truman ShowChapter 17: Federico Fellini's 8 1/2Chapter 18: Styles And Dramatic StructuresChapter 19: What's Next? Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351683111 20170821
Film Directing Fundamentals gives the novice director an organic methodology for realizing on-screen the full dramatic possibility of a screenplay. Unique among directing books, Nicholas Proferes provides clear-cut ways to translate a script to the screen. Using the script as a blueprint, the reader is led through specific techniques to analyze and translate its components into a visual story. A sample screenplay is included that explicates the techniques discussed. Written for both students and entry-level professionals, the book assumes no knowledge and introduces basic concepts and terminology. Appropriate for screenwriters, aspiring directors and filmmakers, Film Directing Fundamentals helps filmmakers bring their story to life on screen. This fourth edition is updated with a new foreword by Student Academy Award-winner Jimmy Keyrouz, who studied with author Nicholas Proferes, as well as an enhanced companion website by Laura J. Medina, available at www.routledge.com/cw/proferes, which features new supplemental material for both instructors and students, including two new analyses of contemporary films-Wendy and Lucy (2008) and Moonlight (2016)-study questions, suggested assignments and exercises, as well as the instructor's manual written by Proferes in 2008.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351683111 20170821
Book
x, 115 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 368 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgments vii Introduction 1 1 Overture: Musical Traditions before Cinema 11 2 You Ain t Heard Nothin Yet: The Sound Revolution 35 3 Face the Music and Dance: The Depression 67 4 Singing a Song of Freedom: World War II 97 5 There s Beauty Everywhere: MGM and the Freed Unit 125 6 Something s Gotta Give: The Postwar Musical 147 7 Bustin Out All Over: The Rise of the Musical Blockbuster 175 8 In a Minor Key: The B Musical and Beyond 197 9 The Sound of Money: Musicals in the 1960s 225 10 Whistling in the Dark: A Genre in Crisis 251 11 Can t Stop the Music: Musicals and the New Hollywood 279 12 Just Like Scheherezade: Reviving the Musical Film Genre 307 Index 335.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405194969 20170907
A History of the American Musical narrates the evolution of the film musical genre, discussing its influences and how it has come to be defined; the first text on this subject for over two decades, it employs the very latest concepts and research. The most up-to-date text on the subject, with uniquely comprehensive coverage and employing the very latest concepts and researchSurveys centuries of music history from the music and dance of Native Americans to contemporary music performance in streaming mediaExamines the different ways the film musical genre has been defined, what gets counted as a musical, why, and who gets to make that decisionThe text is written in an accessible manner for general cinema and musical theatre buffs, whilst retaining theoretical rigour in researchDescribes the contributions made to the genre by marginalized or subordinated identity groups who have helped invent and shape the musical.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405194969 20170907
Green Library
Book
174 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 276 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • CONTENTS List of Figures Notes on Contributors Acknowledgements Introduction: Claire Loffman & Harriet Phillips (Queen Mary University of London) 1 Before Editing 1.1 Introducing Archives 1.1.1 Approaching the Archives, Michael Riordan (St John's & Queen's Colleges, Oxford) 1.1.2 Catalogues and Other Finding Aids, Antonia Moon (British Library) 1.1.3 Primum non nocere: Handling Special Collections Material, Anna Sander (Balliol College, Oxford) 1.1.4 Accessing Hidden Collections, Christopher Fletcher (Bodleian Library) 1.2 Planning & Proposing an Edition 1.2.1 The Uses of Serendipity, Joad Raymond (Queen Mary University of London) 1.2.2 The Evolutionary Edition, Claire Preston (Queen Mary University of London) 1.2.3 Getting Started on Proposing an Edition, Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex) & Jennifer Richards (Newcastle University) 1.2.4 A Publisher's Perspective, Jacqueline Norton (Oxford University Press) 1.3 Edition Management & Protocols 1.3.1 Organising a Large Edition (An Early Modern Addendum), Barbara Cooke (University of Leicester) Claire Loffman & Harriet Phillips (Queen Mary University of London) 1.3.2 The Form of a Documentary Edition, Steven W. May (Emory University) 1.3.3 Edition Management and Protocols, Daniel Carey (National University of Ireland, Galway) and Claire Jowitt (University of East Anglia) 2 Editing: Principles and Practice 2.1 Apparatus 2.1.1 Introductions, Reid Barbour (UNC Chapel Hill) 2.1.2 Annotations, Felicity Henderson (University of Exeter) 2.1.3 Images, Felicity Henderson (University of Exeter) 2.1.4 Textual apparatus and Reader Engagement, Valerie Rumbold (University of Birmingham) 2.1.5 Appendices, Kevin Killeen (University of York) 2.1.6 Indexes, Roger Kuin (York University, Toronto) 2.2 Text: Collation 2.2.1 Copies of Renaissance Texts, Steven W. May (Emory University) 2.2.2 Print Collation, Sebastiaan Verweij (University of Bristol) 2.3 Text: Modernisation & Translation 2.3.1 To Modernise or not to Modernize? H.R Woudhuysen (Lincoln College, Oxford) 2.3.2 The Problems with Old-Spelling Editions, Gavin Alexander (Christ's College, Cambridge) 2.3.3 In Defence of Old-Spelling Editions, Roger Kuin (York University, Toronto) 2.3.4 Modernisation versus Old-Spelling for Early Modern Printed Prose, Joseph L. Black (University of Massachusetts Amherst) 2.3.5 Translations, Neil Rhodes (University of St Andrews) 2.4 Text: Arrangement & Presentation 2.4.1 Transcription, Michael Hunter (Birkbeck University of London) 2.4.2 The Materiality of Early Modern Letters, James Daybell (Plymouth University) 2.4.3 Mise-en-page: Editing Early Modern Letters, Joe Moshenska (Trinity College, Cambridge) 2.4.4 Mise-en-page: Editing Lyric Poetry from Manuscripts, Victoria E. Burke (University of Ottawa) 2.4.5 Variety in Copy-Text, David Colclough (Queen Mary University of London) 2.4.6 Edition Defined by Venue, Peter McCullough (Lincoln College, Oxford) 2.4.7 Ordering the Epistolary, Louise Curran (Trinity College, Oxford) 2.5 Unedited and Oft-edited Texts 2.5.1 Whether and How to Edit Manuscript Miscellanies, Arthur Marotti (Wayne State University) 2.5.2 The Single-Author Edition and Manuscript Miscellanies, Christopher Burlinson (Jesus College, Cambridge) 2.5.3 Editing Oft-Edited Texts: Annotating Shakespeare, Raphael Lyne (Murray Edwards College, Cambridge) 3 Digital Editing 3.1 Theory and Practice Parting with 'much wee know': Digital Editing and the Early Modern Text Andrew Zurcher (Queens' College, Cambridge) 3.1.2 XML and The 'Archaeology of Reading, ' Matthew Symonds (University College London) & Jaap Geraerts (University College London) 3.2 Online Editions 3.2.1 Digital XML-Based Editing: The Case of Bess of Hardwick's Letters, Alison Wiggins (University of Glasgow) 3.2.2 Scriptorium: When to Build a Digital Archive rather than a Digital Edition, Angus Vine (University of Stirling) 3.3 Social Editing 3.3.1 Social Editing and the Devonshire Manuscript, Raymond Siemens (University of Victoria), Constance Crompton (University of British Columbia, Okanagan), Daniel Powell (King's College London and University of Victoria), Alyssa Arbuckle (University of Victoria), with the Devonshire Manuscript Editorial Group 3.3.2 Annotation and the Social Edition, Rebecca Anne Barr & Justin Tonra (National University of Ireland, Galway) 4 Case Studies 4.1 On Error Cathy Shrank (University of Sheffield) 4.2 On Mess Kate Bennett (Magdalen College, Oxford) 4.3 On Ordering Chronologically Ian Donaldson (University of Melbourne) 4.4 On Media Ruth Connolly (University of Newcastle) 4.5 On Annotation as Conversation Jessica Wolfe (UNC Chapel Hill) 5 Bibliography 6 Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472474780 20170911
A Handbook of Editing Early Modern Texts provides a series of answers written by more than forty editors of diverse texts addressing the 'how-to's' of completing an excellent scholarly edition. The Handbook is primarily a practical guide rather than a theoretical forum; it airs common problems and offers a number of solutions to help a range of interested readers, from the lone editor of an unedited document, through to the established academic planning a team-enterprise, multi-volume re-editing of a canonical author. Explicitly, this Handbook does not aim to produce a linear treatise telling its readers how they 'should' edit. Instead, it provides them with a thematically ordered collection of insights drawn from the practical experiences of a symposium of editors. Many implicit areas of consensus on good practice in editing are recorded here, but there are also areas of legitimate disagreement to be charted. The Handbook draws together a diverse range of first person narratives detailing the approaches taken by different editors, with their accompanying rationales, and evaluations of the benefits and problems of their chosen methods. The collection's aim is to help readers to read modern editions more sensitively, and to make better-informed decisions in their own editorial projects.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472474780 20170911
Green Library
Book
143 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 190 pages : map ; 24 cm.
"In Juvenal's Global Awareness Osman Umurhan applies theories of globalization to an investigation of Juvenal's articulation and understanding of empire, imperialism and identity. Umurhan explains how the increased interconnectivity between different localities, ethnic and political, shapes Juvenal's view of Rome as in constant flux and motion. Theoretical and sociological notions of deterritorialization, time-space compression and the rhizome inform the satirist's language of mobility and his construction of space and place within 2nd century Rome and its empire. The circulation of people, goods and ideas generated by processes of globalization facilitates Juvenal's negotiation of threats and changes to Roman institutions that include a wide array of topics, from representations of the army and food to discussions of cannibalism and language. Umurhan's analysis stresses that Juvenalian satire itself is a rhizome in both function and form. This study is designed for audiences interested in Juvenal, empire and globalization under Rome."-- Provided by publisher
Green Library
Book
xxi, 215 pages : maps ; 21 cm
Green Library
Book
141 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 279 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • CONTENTS Foreword, Lisa Baraitser Acknowledgements Notes on Contributors Introduction: Motherhood in Literature and Culture Victoria Browne, Adalgisa Giorgio, Emily Jeremiah, Abigail Lee Six, and Gill Rye Part I: Pregnancy and Birth 1: Birth Fear and the Subjugation of Women's Strength: Towards a Broader Conceptualization of Femininity in Birth Susannah Sweetman 2: The Temporalities of Pregnancy: On Contingency, Loss, and Waiting Victoria Browne 3: An (Un)Familiar Story: Exploring Ultrasound Poems by Contemporary British Women Writers Emily Blewitt 4: Birthing Tales and Collective Memory in Recent French Fiction Valerie Worth-Stylianou 5: Natality, Materiality, Maternity: The Sublime and the Grotesque in Contemporary Sculpture Christine Battersby Part II: Generation and Relation 6: Erasing Mother, Seeking Father: Biotechnological Interventions, Anxieties over Motherhood, and Donor Offspring's Narratives of Self Gabriele Griffin 7: Mums or Dads? Lesbian Mothers in France Gill Rye 8: The Kinning of the Transnationally Adopted Child in Contemporary Norway Signe Howell 9: Ties that Bind in Tanja Duckers's Novel Himmelskorper: History, Memory, and Making Sense of Motherhood in Twenty-First-Century Germany Katherine Stone 10: Matrixial Creativity and the Wit(h)nessing of Trauma: Reconnecting Mothers and Daughters in Marosia Castaldi's Novel Dentro le mie mani le tue: Tetralogia di Nightwater Adalgisa Giorgo Part III: Experience and Affect 11: Publicizing Vulnerability: Motherhood and Affect in Joanna Rajkowska's Post-2011 Art Justyna Wierzchowska 12: Present and Obscured: Disabled Women as Mothers in Social Policy Harriet Clarke 13: Nuria C. Botey's Short Story "Viviendo con el tio Roy": Motherhood and Risk Assessment under Duress Abigail Lee Six 14: Broken Nights, Shattered Selves: Maternal Ambivalence and the Ethics of Interruption in Sarah Moss's novel Night Waking Emily Jeremiah 15: Uncertain Mothers: Maternal Ambivalence in Alina Marazzi's Film Tutto parla di te Claudia Karagoz 16: "How to Say Hello to the Sea": Literary Perspectives on Medico-Legal Narratives of Maternal Filicide Ruth Cain Reflections 17: To Be or Not To Be (a Mother): Telling Academic and Personal Stories of Mothers and Others Gayle Letherby 18: Last Will and Testament: Potatoes, Love, and Poetry Ana Luisa Amaral.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138648173 20170911
Motherhood remains a complex and contested issue in feminist research as well as public discussion. This interdisciplinary volume explores cultural representations of motherhood in various contemporary European contexts3/4 including France, Italy, Germany, Portugal, Spain, and the UK3/4 and considers how such representations affect the ways in which different individuals and groups negotiate motherhood as both institution and lived experience. It has a particular focus on literature, but also includes essays that examine representations of motherhood in philosophy, art, social policy, TV, and film. The book's driving contention is that, through intersecting with other fields and disciplines, literature and the study of literature have an important role to play in nuancing dialogues around motherhood, by offering challenging insights and imaginative responses to complex problems and experiences. This is demonstrated throughout the volume which covers a range of topics including: discursive and visual depictions of pregnancy and birth; the impact of new reproductive technologies on changing family configurations; the relationship between mothering and citizenship; the shaping of policy imperatives regarding mothering and disability; and the difficult realities of miscarriage, child death, violence, and infanticide. The collection expands and complicates hegemonic notions of motherhood, as the authors map and analyze shifting conceptions of maternal subjectivity and embodiment, explore some of the constraining and/or enabling contexts in which mothering takes place, and ask searching questions about what it means to be a 'mother' in Europe today. It will be of interest not only to those working in gender, women's, and feminist studies, but also to scholars in literary and cultural studies, and those researching in sociology, criminology, politics, psychology, medical ethics, midwifery, and related fields.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138648173 20170911
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 336 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 368 pages ; 26 cm
Green Library
Book
1 online resource ( pages) : illustrations
  • Chapter One - Schedule & Budget Basics What is Production Management The Schedule and Budget Relationship Why Schedule and Budget are the Foundation Who Manages the Schedule & Budget A Little History Helpful Tools and Software A Manual & Computer Approach Trends to Consider Basic Steps Scheduling Budgeting The End Uses of Budget and Schedule End of Chapter One Review Chapter Two - Identifying Resources: the Breakdown Relationship of Script and Breakdown Script Format Screenplay Software & Online Collaboration Tools The Process of Breaking Down a Script Read Script Completely Your System: Software, Colors, Numbers Number Scenes Eighths of a Page Identify Resources Breakdown Forms Transfer Information to Breakdown Forms End of Chapter Two Review Chapter Three - Organizing Resources: The Schedule Creating A Schedule Workflow & Consistency Transfer & Verify Breakdown Information Into Schedule Grouping Like Things Sets Cast The Most Finite Resource Arrange Schedule For Maximum Efficiency One-Liner Schedule Day Out Of Days Factors Impacting The Schedule Length of Script and Genre Film Or Digital Format Shooting Ratio & Experience Unions & Guilds Locations Length Of Shooting Week / Day Sample SchedulesEnd Of Chapter Three Review Chapter Four - Pricing Resources: the Budget Budget Components Construction Presentation Calculation Account Numbers Backing into a Number Price resources Factors Impacting the Budget Type of Project and End Uses Locations & Incentives Wages, Union & Guilds Project Length & Format Financing and Crowd Funding Building a Budget Setup Above the Line: Creative & Development Costs Below the Line: Production Below the Line: Post Below the Line: Other Expenses Sample Budgets Blank Budget Forms End of Chapter Four Review Chapter Five - Helpful Scheduling & Budgeting Tips Evolution of the Schedule & Budget The Team: A.D., Director, Producer, Location Manager Prices, Rates and Deal Making Changes During Shooting Publicity, Marketing & Film Festivals Safety, Legal & Insurance Distribution Expenses Hidden Expenses End of Chapter Five Review Chapter Six - Managing Resources Relationship between Script, Schedule & Budget Production Accountant, A.D. and Line Producer Optimize The Shoot No Unnecessary Movement Consider the Weather (between shooting, or down time) Days Off and Turnaround, Rest Time, Meal Times Using a Second Unit Other Factors, End of Chapter Six Review Chapter Seven - Special Considerations Narrative Feature Film Documentary Film Shorts, Web Video & Webisodes Television Educational & Corporate Film Working Without a Script End of Chapter Seven Review Chapter Eight - Additional Topics You Are Bound to Encounter Scheduling Questions about Eighths Script Inconsistency & New Versions Honing Your Scheduling Skills The Experience of your Team Budgeting Checking Your Numbers Obscure Budgetary Categories and Terminology Currency Conversion Honing Your Budgetary Skills In Conclusion End of Chapter Eight Review.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781315454832 20170821
Budgeting and scheduling are easy in principle but hard in practice. The successful producer has a solid plan for juggling dozens of activities and costs while retaining the flexibility to cope with those inevitable last-minute changes and stay on course. Preplanning the budget and schedule of any media project is absolutely essential, and the second edition of Scheduling and Budgeting Your Film: A Panic-Free Guide shows you the intricacies of handling both budgeting and scheduling successfully. This new and updated edition explains the fundamentals of line producing in an easy-to-understand style, and includes tips and techniques that apply no matter what kind of scheduling or budgeting software you're using. Paula Landry includes detailed examples of breakdown forms, organizing resources, distribution expenses, and hidden costs, and discusses how to set realistic priorities and find industry and state tax incentives. The new edition also includes discussions of transmedia and multi-purpose shooting, special considerations for VR, 4K and 3D shooting, new web platforms and mobile technology, crowd funding, film festivals, and much more. Each chapter is filled with handy checklists, tips, practical advice, and anecdotes, showing how scheduling and budgeting are done in the real world; Principles apply to any type of media project: film, video, music video, projects hosted online, corporate, and educational videos; An accompanying eResources page offers downloadable forms and templates, and other essential resources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781315454832 20170821
Book
xi, 307 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Green Library