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Journal/Periodical
24 v.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 188 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Introduction
  • Two modes of prestige film
  • Hollywood as popular sociology
  • Hollywood and the public sphere
  • A genre out of cycles
  • Realist melodrama
  • Epilogue.
After World War II, Hollywood's "social problem films" - tackling topical issues that included racism, crime, mental illness, and drug abuse - were hits with critics and general moviegoers alike. In an era of film famed for its reliance on pop psychology, these movies were a form of popular sociology, bringing the academic discipline's concerns to a much broader audience. Sociology on Film examines how the postwar "problem film" translated contemporary policy debates and intellectual discussions into cinematic form in order to become one of the preeminent genres of prestige drama. Chris Cagle chronicles how these movies were often politically fractious, the work of progressive directors and screenwriters who drew scrutiny from the House Un-American Activities Committee. Yet he also proposes that the genre helped to construct an abstract discourse of "society" that served to unify a middlebrow American audience. As he considers the many forms of print media that served to inspire social problem films, including journalism, realist novels, and sociological texts, Cagle also explores their distinctive cinematic aesthetics. Through a close analysis of films like Gentleman's Agreement, The Lost Weekend, and Intruder in the Dust, he presents a compelling case that the visual style of these films was intimately connected to their more expressly political and sociological aspirations. Sociology on Film demonstrates how the social problem picture both shaped and reflected the middle-class viewer's national self-image, making a lasting impact on Hollywood's aesthetic direction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813576947 20170213
Green Library
Book
ix, 304 p. ; 24 cm.
This text examines the effect on modern politics of the new media, which include talk radio, tabloid journalism, television talk shows, entertainment media, and computer networks. Davis and Owen discuss the new media's cultural environment, audience, and content, and evaluate its impact on everything from elections to policy making to the old media itself. The book is intended for scholars and students of politics, sociology, and media studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195120615 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 189 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments List of Illustrations Introduction 1 - Journalism as Literary Practice During Modernismo 2 - "Possession of the Infinite": Temporality and Difference in Modernismo 3 - "Circulation and Vitality": Editorial Influence, Visual Culture and the Cronica Modernista 4 - "The House of Ideas": The Cronica Modernista, Material Culture of the Book and Literary History Works Cited About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611484687 20160610
This study explores how Spanish American modernista writers incorporated journalistic formalities and industry models through the cronica genre to advance their literary preoccupations. Through a variety of modernista writers, including Jose Marti, Amado Nervo, Manuel Gutierrez Najera and Ruben Dario, Reynolds argues that extra-textual elements-such as temporality, the material formats of the newspaper and book, and editorial influence-animate the modernista movement's literary ambitions and aesthetic ideology. Thus, instead of being stripped of an esteemed place in the literary sphere due to participation in the market-based newspaper industry, journalism actually brought modernismo closer to the writers' desired artistic autonomy. Reynolds uncovers an original philosophical and sociological dimension of the literary forms that govern modernista studies, situating literary journalism of the movement within historical, economic and temporal contexts. Furthermore, he demonstrates that journalism of the movement was eventually consecrated in book form, revealing modernista intentionality for their mass-produced, seemingly utilitarian journalistic articles. The Spanish American Cronica Modernista, Temporality, and Material Culture thereby enables a better understanding of how the material textuality of the cronica impacts its interpretation and readership.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611484687 20160610
Green Library
Book
xiii, 186 pages ; 21 cm.
  • Introduction: Orwell: Good or Ungood?......................................................... ................................. 2 Section 1............................................................... ................................................................ .......... 9 Chapter I In Defense of Comrade Psmith: the Orwellian treatment of Orwell............................... 9 Chapter II The Orwellian Method.......................................................... ........................................ 21 Chapter III Orwell the Socialist....................................................... ............................................... 25 Chapter IV Tangential Criticisms...................................................... ............................................. 34 Conclusion...................................................... ................................................................ .......... 35 Section 2 -In Memoriam- retrospective views........................................................... ............... 38 Chapter V Orwell's Own Airstrip One in 2014............................................................ ................... 38 Chapter VI The Persistence of Pessimism, Oceania 20 years after Nineteen Eighty-Four............... 42 Chapter VII Afterlife of An Atheist......................................................... ....................................... 46 Section 3 Beyond the Telescreen - Snitching, Snooping and Surveillance............................ 62 Chapter VIII No bother about Big Brother......................................................... ............................. 62 Chapter IX Alexander Cockburn and "Snitching"..................................................... ...................... 67 Chapter X The List............................................................ ............................................................. 73 "The List"........................................................... ................................................................ ....... 77 Section 4 What Is Left?........................................................... ..................................................... 82 Chapter XI Disabusing Idiocy? Orwell & the Left............................................................ ................ 82 Chapter XII Orwell and the Democratic Left............................................................ ...................... 84 Chapter XIII Striking Back at the Empire.......................................................... ............................... 90 Interlude....................................................... ................................................................ .............. 106 Chapter XIV Revolution Is No Tea Party but It's Easier in a Salon: Reading the Leaves Afterwards 106 Chapter XV Orwell and the Left in the United States -the Under-reported side of Oceania!........ 114 Chapter XVI Letters to Oceania?........................................................ .......................................... 139 Chapter XVII Irving Howe, Orwell's Prophet in the USA............................................................. .. 143 Section 6 Cover Bards - Hitchens the Orwell Emulator And His Detractors............................. 158 Chapter XVIII Orwell's Lives........................................................... ............................................. 158 Chapter XIX Why Hitchens Matters......................................................... .................................... 164 Chapter XX Christopher Hitchens and Orwell.......................................................... .................... 171 Chapter XXI Antithesis Incarnate: Christopher Hitchens, A Retrospective Glance......................... 173 Chapter XXII Hitchens and the Iraq War............................................................. .......................... 183 Chapter XXIII Truth in Journalism...................................................... .......................................... 190 Selected Bibliography.................................................... ............................................................ 194 Notes........................................................... ................................................................ .................... 2.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781349952533 20171017
This book analyzes George Orwell's politics and their reception across both sides of the Atlantic. It considers Orwell's place in the politics of his native Britain and his reception in the USA, where he has had some of his most fervent emulators, exegetists, and detractors. Written by an ex "teenage Maoist" from Liverpool, UK, who now lives and writes in New York, the book points out how often the different strands of opinion derive from "ancestral" ideological struggles within the Communist/Trotskyist movement in the 30's, and how these often overlook or indeed consciously ignore the indigenous British politics and sociology that did so much to influence Orwell's political and literary development. It examines in the modern era what Orwell did in his-the seductions of simplistic and absolutist ideologies for some intellectuals, especially in their reactions to Orwell himself.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781349952533 20171017
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 423 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements
  • Prologue
  • Introduction : Sociolinguistic diversification
  • Diversification
  • Diversification : social stratification
  • Diversification : Stratification and popularization
  • Language traditions
  • Literary and popular language
  • Language reforms and standardization
  • Afterthe Warsof Independence
  • Schoolsofthought
  • The case of Spanish : from the beginning to New World Spanish
  • New World Spanish : spoken and written
  • The aim of this book
  • Thechapters
  • Explicative models
  • The origins of Spanish : Spain and the New World
  • The origins
  • The riseof Castilian
  • Repopulation of Andalusia
  • Toledano and Old Castilian
  • De-affrication, devoicing and inter-dentalization
  • De-patatalization
  • Yeísmo or de-latelarization
  • Aspiration and omission of/s/ in implosive position
  • Additional changes
  • Spanish initial F- : pastand přsent perspectives
  • Featuresof Judaeo-Spanish
  • Features from Spain transplanted to New Spain
  • The features of Andalusian Spanish
  • Spanish speakers in New Spain
  • Spanish speakers and the castes in the 16th century
  • Theories on the origins of New World Spanish
  • Koines and koineization in New World Spanish
  • The use of dialect features in New Spain
  • Conclusions
  • The first speakers of Mexican Spanish
  • The first Spanish speakers in Mesoamerica and social stratification
  • The Spanish Caribbean experiment
  • The encomienda in New Spain
  • The new System of social stratification
  • Origins of the first Spanish speakers
  • The new laws of 1542
  • Spanish speakers in the 16th century : numbers and regions
  • The new environment
  • The process of socialization and diffusion
  • Thecenter
  • The Inquisition
  • Mattersof routine in and around the Holy Office
  • Spanish and the Holy Office
  • The sins recorded by the Holy Office
  • Spanish speakers and ethnie groups in the Abecedario
  • Spanish speakers of African descent
  • Afro-Mexicans and the process of acculturation
  • Afro-Mexican enclaves
  • Conclusions
  • The Spanish language and its variations in New Spain
  • The earliest Spanish documents written in Mexico
  • The First Letter by Hernán Cortés
  • The Second Letter by Hernán Cortés
  • Salient features in Hernán Cortés' Cartas de Relación
  • Adaptation of Amerindian languages
  • Morphology and syntax
  • Common verbs in transition
  • Verbal clitics
  • Stylistic and dialect variations
  • Indicative and subjunctive
  • Imperfect subjunctive in adverbial clauses
  • Imperfect subjunctive in translation
  • Conditional sentences with -SE in translation
  • Conditional sentences with -RA in translation
  • Extinct and current lexical items and discourse markers
  • Use of Taino borrowings
  • Documentation of Taino borrowings in New Spain
  • Pronounsof address
  • General features of 16th Century Spanish pronunciation
  • General features of 16th Century Spanish : morpho-syntax
  • Conclusions
  • Koineization and the first generation of Spanish speakers
  • The first generation
  • Spanish space and Spanish institutions
  • The formation of the Mexican Spanish koine
  • The Spanish spoken and written in the 16th Century
  • Evidence of dialect contact and dialect change
  • Other documents related to Hernán Cortés
  • The features of Cortesian texts
  • Spellings of common verbs
  • Morpho-syntactic features of Cortesian texts
  • Position of verbal clitics
  • Pro-etymological and anti-etymologicat verbal clitics
  • Variable use of PARA and PA
  • The useof imperfect subjunctive
  • Pronounsof address : from Cortés' letters to 1555
  • Diffusion of Spanish, discourse markers, and lexical items
  • Loansfrom Taino and Nahuatl
  • The speech of Diego de Ordaz
  • Morpho-syntactic features of Diego de Ordaz
  • The origins of voseo
  • Nahuatl loans in the Vocabulario de la lengua castellana y mexicana
  • The explicative model of proto-Mexican Spanish
  • The Gulfof Mexico
  • The sibilants in the Gulf
  • Leísmo in the Gulf
  • Use of subject pronouns : vos, vosotros, vuestra merced
  • Imperfect subjunctive : variations in -SE and -RA
  • Lexicon
  • Conclusions
  • How Spanish diversified
  • Occupationalactivitiesand social networks
  • Mining and metallurgy
  • Mining centers and ethnie groups
  • Taxco
  • Pachuca
  • Sultepec
  • Puebla
  • Queretaro
  • San Luis Potosi
  • Guanajuato
  • Zacatecas
  • Forms of labor and language contact
  • Losingthetiestothe land
  • Labor and agriculture : indigenous vs. Spanish crops
  • The obrajes
  • Formal ̌ducation
  • Education for women
  • Additional activities promoting the use of Spanish
  • Spanish literature in Spain and in New Spain
  • Conclusions
  • Continuity and change : The second generation
  • The innovations of the second generation
  • Linguistic documents : the Central Highlands
  • Pronunciation traits
  • Other pronunciation features
  • Morpho-syntactic features
  • Imperfect subjunctive
  • Pronouns of address
  • Original letters by Alonso Ortiz
  • Mixing tú, vos and vuestra merced
  • Suárez de Peralta's Tratado del descubrimiento de las Yndias y su conquista
  • Relevant features in Sùrez de Peralta's Tratado
  • Object pronouns LES and LOS in the second-generation
  • Other object pronouns
  • Verb forms
  • Pronoun of address in the Tratado
  • Vuesa(s) merced(es)
  • Use of imperfect subjunctive
  • Conditional sentences ending with -RA
  • Discourse markers, idiomatic expressions and other features
  • References toethnicity
  • Linguistic documents : the Gulf
  • Miscellaneous traits in the Gulf
  • The system of pronouns of address : tú, vos, vosotros, vuestra merced, su merced
  • Ctitic pronouns as direct objects
  • Imperfect subjunctive : variations of -SE and -RA
  • Lexical items referring to ethnicity
  • More examptes from the second generation
  • Conclusions
  • Religion, bilingualism and acculturation
  • Religion as a driving force
  • Population losses and language shift
  • Factors contributing to maintenance : new politicai Organization
  • New religion and language maintenance and shift
  • Rescuing the past for the future
  • The second generation and the good memories about Tlatelolco
  • Strategies of Hispanizaron
  • Religion and the indigenous masses
  • Hispanicization of the indigenous
  • Transculturation and miscegenation
  • Language contact, bilingualism, and socio-ethnie groups
  • Bilingual individuais and bilingual groups
  • Ethnicity and socio-ethnie labels
  • Hispanization of the Afro-Mexican population
  • Conclusions
  • Diversification and stability : 17th century
  • Spanish speakers in the 17th century
  • Education of Spanish speakers
  • Uprooting and integration of the castes
  • Colonial Spanish in the oldest Spanish-speaking regions
  • The spellingof the sibilants in Castilian
  • The spelling of the sibilants in the Central Highlands
  • Sibilants in the Gulf
  • "Regular" seseo
  • Residual verb forms
  • Leísmo in the Central Highlands and in the Gulf
  • Inanimate objects and leísmo
  • Pronouns of address : tú, vuestra merced, su merced, Usted
  • Vuestra merced. Usted and vosotros
  • Change of pronouns in the personal domain
  • Imperfect subjunctive with -SE and -RA
  • Ethnie groups
  • Literature in Spanish
  • Conclusion
  • The end of the colonial period : 18th century
  • Attrition of peninsular Spanish variants
  • The growth and decline of the colony
  • Spanish emigrantsto NewSpain
  • Population of NewSpain
  • The revillagigedo census
  • The growth of the cities
  • Education
  • The Bourbon reforms, the economy and ethnicity
  • Language attrition in the Central Highlands and in the Gulf
  • Attrition of morpho-syntactic variants
  • Direct object pronouns LE and LO
  • Pronouns of address
  • Use of -SE and -RA in conditional clauses and imperfect subjunctive
  • The use of -SE and -RA in officiai documentation
  • Lexicon
  • Language reforms, journalism and literature
  • Spanish-accented Nahuatl
  • Conclusions
  • Diversification, attrition and residual variants
  • Attrition-focused variants
  • Optimal residual variants
  • The prepositions PARA and PA
  • Dissolution of hiatus
  • Addition of-s in the přťrit
  • Duplicate possessives
  • Amerindian loans
  • Residual variants belonging to the vernacular realm
  • The diphthong /we/ in various positions
  • Verb forms
  • The endings -RA and -RA in protasisand apodosis
  • Lexical items and idiomatic expressions in popular speech
  • The common denominator : residual variants
  • Infrequent variants in modem Mexican Spanish
  • Variants discarded in Mexican Spanish
  • Modem Usted
  • Conclusions
  • Conclusions
  • A tridimensional study
  • The role of history : direct external factors
  • Creole and semi-creole varieties
  • From the past to the present : indirect external factors
  • Peninsular, New World and Latin American Spanish
  • Stages of diversification
  • PARA and PA in Venezuela
  • Diversification of the New World Spanish tree
  • Final conclusions
  • Appendix
  • References
  • Index.
This book covers the analysis of Spanish written from the early 16th to the early 19th century, immediately before the Independent period in most Spanish-speaking colonies. It is based on manuscripts such as the Segunda Carta de Relacion (1522) by Hernan Cortes, a rare inquisitorial manuscript known as El Abecedario, old printed books, and published collections of linguistic documents.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781501512629 20170220
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (viii, 295 p.) : ill.
  • Chapter 1. Media Commentary and the Space of Opinion -- Chapter 2. A History of Opinion in the U.S. Media -- Chapter 3. Media and Opinion Formation: Toward a New Theory of Deliberative Politics -- Chapter 4. Who Speaks in the Space of Opinion? -- Chapter 5. Formats and Norms in the U.S. Space of Opinion -- Chapter 6. Rhetorics in the Space of Contemporary U.S. Opinion -- Chapter 7. The Enron Scandal -- Chapter 8. The War on Terror -- Chapter 9. The Future of Opinion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199797929 20160614
While the newspaper op-ed page, the Sunday morning political talk shows on television, and the evening cable-news television lineup have an obvious and growing influence in American politics and political communication, social scientists and media scholars tend to be broadly critical of the rise of organized punditry during the 20th century without ever providing a close empirical analysis. What is the nature of the contemporary space of opinion? How has it developed historically? What kinds of people speak in this space? What styles of writing and speech do they use? What types of authority and expertise do they draw on? And what impact do their commentaries have on public debate? To describe and analyze this complex space of news media, Ronald Jacobs and Eleanor Townsley rely on enormous samples of opinion collected from newspapers and television shows during the first years of the last two Presidential administrations. They also employ biographical data on authors of opinion to connect specific argument styles to specific types of authors, and examine the distribution of authors and argument types across different formats. The result is a close mapping that reveals a massive expansion and differentiation of the opinion space. It tells a complex story of shifting intersections between journalism, politics, the academy, and the new sector of think tanks. It also reveals a proliferation of genres and forms of opinion; not only have the people who speak within the space of opinion become more diverse over time, but the formats of opinion-claims to authority, styles of speech, and modes of addressing publics-have also become more varied. Though Jacobs and Townsley find many changes, they also find continuities. Despite public anxieties, the project of objective journalism is alive and well, thriving in the older, more traditional formats, and if anything, the proliferation of newer formats has resulted in an intensified commitment (by some) to core journalistic values as clear points of difference that offer competing logics of distinction and professional justification. But the current moment does represent a real challenge as more and different shows compete to narrate politics in the most compelling, authoritative, and influential manner. By providing the first systematic study of media opinion and news commentary, The Space of Opinion will fill an important gap on research about media, politics, and the civil society and will attract readers in a number of disciplines, including sociology, communication, media studies, and political science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199797929 20160614
Book
viii, 295 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1. Media Commentary and the Space of Opinion -- Chapter 2. A History of Opinion in the U.S. Media -- Chapter 3. Media and Opinion Formation: Toward a New Theory of Deliberative Politics -- Chapter 4. Who Speaks in the Space of Opinion? -- Chapter 5. Formats and Norms in the U.S. Space of Opinion -- Chapter 6. Rhetorics in the Space of Contemporary U.S. Opinion -- Chapter 7. The Enron Scandal -- Chapter 8. The War on Terror -- Chapter 9. The Future of Opinion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199797936 20160614
While the newspaper op-ed page, the Sunday morning political talk shows on television, and the evening cable-news television lineup have an obvious and growing influence in American politics and political communication, social scientists and media scholars tend to be broadly critical of the rise of organized punditry during the 20th century without ever providing a close empirical analysis. What is the nature of the contemporary space of opinion? How has it developed historically? What kinds of people speak in this space? What styles of writing and speech do they use? What types of authority and expertise do they draw on? And what impact do their commentaries have on public debate? To describe and analyze this complex space of news media, Ronald Jacobs and Eleanor Townsley rely on enormous samples of opinion collected from newspapers and television shows during the first years of the last two Presidential administrations. They also employ biographical data on authors of opinion to connect specific argument styles to specific types of authors, and examine the distribution of authors and argument types across different formats. The result is a close mapping that reveals a massive expansion and differentiation of the opinion space. It tells a complex story of shifting intersections between journalism, politics, the academy, and the new sector of think tanks. It also reveals a proliferation of genres and forms of opinion; not only have the people who speak within the space of opinion become more diverse over time, but the formats of opinion-claims to authority, styles of speech, and modes of addressing publics-have also become more varied. Though Jacobs and Townsley find many changes, they also find continuities. Despite public anxieties, the project of objective journalism is alive and well, thriving in the older, more traditional formats, and if anything, the proliferation of newer formats has resulted in an intensified commitment (by some) to core journalistic values as clear points of difference that offer competing logics of distinction and professional justification. But the current moment does represent a real challenge as more and different shows compete to narrate politics in the most compelling, authoritative, and influential manner. By providing the first systematic study of media opinion and news commentary, The Space of Opinion will fill an important gap on research about media, politics, and the civil society and will attract readers in a number of disciplines, including sociology, communication, media studies, and political science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199797936 20160614
Business Library
Book
vi, 364 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Paris has always fascinated and welcomed writers. Throughout the twentieth and into the twenty-first century, writers of American, Caribbean, and African descent were no exception. Paris, Capital of the Black Atlantic considers the travels made to Paris-whether literally or imaginatively-by black writers. These collected essays explore the transatlantic circulation of ideas, texts, and objects to which such travels to Paris contributed. Editors Jeremy Braddock and Jonathan P. Eburne expand upon an acclaimed special issue of the journal Modern Fiction Studies with four new essays and a revised introduction. Beginning with W. E. B. Du Bois's trip to Paris in 1900 and ending with the contemporary state of diasporic letters in the French capital, this collection embraces theoretical close readings, materialist intellectual studies of networks, comparative essays, and writings at the intersection of literary and visual studies. Paris, Capital of the Black Atlantic is unique both in its focus on literary fiction as a formal and sociological category and in the range of examples it brings to bear on the question of Paris as an imaginary capital of diasporic consciousness.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781421407791 20160614
Green Library
Book
p.217-226.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xi, 276 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Part I 1. Introduction 2. Miami, 1989 3. Washington, D.C., 1991 Part II 4. Los Angeles, 1992 5. Los Angeles Times Coverage of Los Angeles 6. La Opinion Coverage of Los Angeles 7. African American Newspaper Coverage of Los Angeles 8. Asian American Newspaper Coverage of Los Angeles 9. Conclusions Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Index About the Authors.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803972322 20160528
Over the past three decades, United States foreign policy, new immigrant communities, and increasing global economic interdependence have contributed to an increasingly complex political economy in America's major cities. For instance, recent immigration from Asia and Latin America has generated cultural anxiety and racial backlash among a number of ethnic communities in America. Newspaper Coverage of Interethnic Conflict: Competing Visions of America examines mainstream and ethnic minority news coverage of interethnic conflicts in Miami, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles. Authors Hemant Shah and Michael C. Thornton investigate the role of news in racial formation, the place of ethnic minority media in the public sphere, and how these competing visions of America are part of ongoing social and political struggles to construct, define, and challenge the meanings of race and nation. The authors suggest that mainstream newspapers reinforce dominant racial ideology while ethnic minority newspapers provide an important counter-hegemonic view of U.S. race relations.Features of this text Pioneering and extensive comparisons of the mainstream and ethnic minority press Unique comparative focus on relations among ethnic minorities Both traditional quantitative and qualitative content analysis methods used to examine news stories Informed by the sociological theory known as "racial formation, " which previously has not been applied to the field of mass communication research. The general process of racial formation and the role of news in that process will be compelling to anyone studying the social construction of racial categories. Newspaper Coverage of Interethnic Conflict is highly recommended for students and scholars in the fields of Journalism, Mass Communications, Media Studies, Cultural Studies, and Sociology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803972322 20160528
Green Library
Book
xxvii, 393 p. ; 21 cm.
For ten years, Herbert J. Gans spent considerable time in four major television and magazine newsrooms, observing and talking to the journalists who choose the national news stories that inform America about itself. Writing during the golden age of journalism. Gans included such headline events as the War on Poverty, the Vietnam War and the protests against it, urban ghetto disorders, the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, and Watergate. He was interested in the values, professional standards, and the external pressures that shaped journalists' judgments. Deciding What's News has become a classic. A new preface outlines the major changes that have taken place in the news media since Gans first wrote the book, but it also suggests that the basics of news judgment and the structures of news organizations have changed little Gans's book is still the most comprehensive sociological account of some of the country's most prominent national news media. The book received the 1979 Theatre Library Association Award and the 1980 Book Award of the National Association of Educational Broadcasters. This is the first work to be published under the Medill School of Journalism's "Visions of the American Press" imprint, a new journalism history series featuring both original volumes and reprints of important classics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810122376 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 108 pages ; 22 cm.
  • 1. Sports Journalism, Jason Collins and Michael Sam 2. An Overview of Media Coverage of Gay Male Athletes 3. Comparing Sports Journalism Coverage of Collins and Sam 4. The Kiss 5. The Status of the Conversation.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319627694 20171023
This book examines how sports journalists covered the historic coming out stories of National Basketball Association (NBA) veteran Jason Collins and football All-American Michael Sam in the context of sports' "toy department" reputation as a field whose standards are often criticized as lacking in rigor and depth compared to other forms of journalism. Employing a media sociology approach, reporting about Collins and Sam is addressed in the book via three content analysis studies and interviews with two prominent sports journalists. An overview of other pertinent research is provided along with a detailed account of both athletes' stories. This work should appeal to readers interested in sports journalism, the role of sport in society, and media coverage of gay professional athletes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319627694 20171023
Green Library
Book
xxv, 350 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
Most widely noted for his acclaimed Let Us Now Praise Famous Men and his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, A Death in the Family, Tennessee native James Agee was also a journalist, film critic, poet, and screenwriter. More than fifty years after Agee's untimely death, his canon of work continues to grow in popularity, and his ability to capture the human condition in all its forms remains unparalleled. Agee Agonistes is a compilation of seventeen essays from the James Agee Celebration hosted by the University of Tennessee in April 2005. The collection includes some of the best interpretations of Agee's work and explores the influences on his art, delineates the connections and syntheses he makes within his texts, and examines his involvement in music, ethics, surrealism, local and national history, cinema, television, poetry, literature, sociology, and journalism. The volume features never-before-seen pictures of Agee, previously unknown correspondence, and a remembrance by his oldest daughter, Deedee. The volume also includes the most extensive bibliography of secondary sources on Agee assembled to date.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781572335745 20160527
Green Library
Book
204 p. illus. 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 232 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Introduction / Carl A. Wade and Louis J. Parascandola.
  • Part 1: Pioneering voices. The Writer Who Ran Away: Eric Walrond and Tropic Death / Kenneth Ramchand ; Eric Walrond: From Down Home: Origins of the Afro-American Short Story / Robert Bone.
  • Part 2: Modern critical views. "All Look Alike in Habana": Archaeologies of Blackness across Eric Walrond's Archipelago / Michelle A. Stephens ; Foreign Negro Flash Agents: Eric Walrond and the Discrepancies of Diaspora / Louis Chude-Sokei ; Genre, Gender and Eric Walrond's Equivocal Transnational Vision / Rhonda Frederick ; Eric Walrond and the Proletarian Arts Movement / Michael Niblett.
  • Part 3: Biographical sketches. Eric Walrond and the Dynamics of White Patronage during the Harlem Renaissance / Carl A. Wade, Robert Bone and Louis J. Parascandola. A Prism so Strange: The Biography of Eric Walrond / James Davis ; A West Indian Grows in Brooklyn: The Early American Experiences of Eric Walrond / Louis J. Parascandola and James Davis ; Exile on Main Street: Eric Walrond and Garveyism in Great Britain in the 1930s / Carl Pedersen.
"Eric Walrond (1898-1966), author of Tropic Death (1926), remains a seminal but elusive figure in Harlem Renaissance and Caribbean diasporic literature. Although this collection remains his only major text, Walrond was in fact quite prolific, penning several more fictions and journalistic writings. Born in British Guiana (Guyana), he endured a peripatetic existence, beleaguered at every turn by those colonial crises and conflicts that constitute the central concerns of his fiction and journalism. Despite the enduing popularity of Tropic Death, there has been little sustained critical examination of Walrond's achievement. In Eric Walrond: The critical Heritage, Louis J. Parascandola and Carl A. Wade address this deficiency, fashioning the first critical anthology on Walrond. The ten essays in this volume employ a variety of literary, cultural and sociological approaches to illuminate the art and imagination of a writer celebrated as one of the most complex authors of the Harlem Renaissance. Included in the collection are two early commentaries by noted West Indian critic Kenneth Ramchand (his article is revised for this volume) and the late American scholar Robert Bone, as well as contributions by more contemporary voices. This comprehensive dissection of Walrond's life and writings reveals an oeuvre that still has much to contribute to discussions about modern black literary and cultural studies."--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
xx, 352 p. ; 24 cm.
In "Gary Snyder and the Pacific Rim", Timothy Gray draws upon previously unpublished journals and letters, as well as his own close readings of Gary Snyder's well-crafted poetry and prose to track the early career of a maverick intellectual whose writings powered the San Francisco Renaissance of the 1950s and 1960s. Exploring various aspects of cultural geography, Gray asserts that this west coast literary community seized upon the idea of a Pacific Rim regional structure, in part to recognize their Orientalist desires and in part to consolidate their opposition to America's cold war ideology, which tended to divide East from West. The geographical consciousness of Snyder's writing was particularly influential, Gray argues, because it gave San Francisco's Beat and hippie cultures a set of physical coordinates by which they could chart their utopian visions of peace and love. Gray's introduction tracks the increased use of "Pacific Rim discourse" by politicians and business leaders following World War II. Ensuing chapters analyze Snyder's countercultural invocation of this regional idea, concentrating on the poet's migratory or "creaturely" sensibility, his gift for literary translation, his physical embodiment of trans-Pacific ideals, his role as tribal spokesperson for Haight-Ashbury hippies, and his burgeoning interest in environmental issues. Throughout, Gray's citations of such writers as Allen Ginsberg, Philip Whalen, and Joanne Kyger shed light on Snyder's communal role, providing an amazingly intimate portrait of the west coast counterculture. An interdisciplinary project that utilizes models of ecology, sociology, and comparative religion to supplement traditional methods of literary biography, "Gary Snyder and the Pacific Rim" offers a unique perspective on Snyder's life and work. This book will fascinate literary and Asian studies scholars, as well as the general reader interested in the Beat movement and multicultural influences on poetry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780877459767 20160528
Green Library
Book
xl, 393 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Sponsored by the Communication, Information Technologies, and Media Sociology section of the American Sociological Association (CITAMS), this volume assembles the contributions of a dynamic editorial team composed of leading scholars from Brazil and the United States. Volume 13 provides an unparalleled compilation of research on Brazilian media and communication studies guided by the expert hands of prominent scholars from both Brazil and the United States. Over twenty chapters explore five key themes: the new face of news and journalism, social movements and protest, television, cinema, publicity and marketing, and media theory. Selections encompass research on emergent phenomena, as well as studies with a historical or longitudinal dimension, that reflect the Brazilian case as laboratory for exploring the evolving media environment of one of the world's most fascinating societies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786357861 20170807
Green Library
Book
viii, 275 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • AcknowledgmentsIntroduction: Making Modernism Big1. Willa Cather's Promiscuous Fiction2. Printing the Color Line in The Crisis3. On the Clock: Rewriting Literary Work at Time Inc.4. Our Eliot: Mass Modernism and the American Century5. Hemingway's Disappearing StyleAfterword: Working from HomeNotesBibliographyIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231177726 20161024
American novelists and poets who came of age in the early twentieth century were taught to avoid journalism "like wet sox and gin before breakfast." It dulled creativity, rewarded sensationalist content, and stole time from "serious" writing. Yet Willa Cather, W. E. B. Du Bois, Jessie Fauset, James Agee, T. S. Eliot, and Ernest Hemingway all worked in the editorial offices of groundbreaking popular magazines and helped to invent the house styles that defined McClure's, The Crisis, Time, Life, Esquire, and others. On Company Time tells the story of American modernism from inside the offices and on the pages of the most successful and stylish magazines of the twentieth century. Working across the borders of media history, the sociology of literature, print culture, and literary studies, Donal Harris draws out the profound institutional, economic, and aesthetic affiliations between modernism and American magazine culture. Starting in the 1890s, a growing number of writers found steady paychecks and regular publishing opportunities as editors and reporters at big magazines. Often privileging innovative style over late-breaking content, these magazines prized novelists and poets for their innovation and attention to literary craft. In recounting this history, On Company Time challenges the narrative of decline that often accompanies modernism's incorporation into midcentury middlebrow culture. Its integrated account of literary and journalistic form shows American modernism evolving within as opposed to against mass print culture. Harris's work also provides an understanding of modernism that extends beyond narratives centered on little magazines and other "institutions of modernism" that served narrow audiences. And for the writers, the "double life" of working for these magazines shaped modernism's literary form and created new models of authorship.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231177726 20161024
Green Library
Book
xv, 297 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction: A Short History of Macho Criticism-- 1. "Healthy Nerves And Sturdy Physiques": Remaking the Male Body of Literary Culture in the 1930s-- 2. Doughfaces, Eggheads, and Softies: On the Evolution of Gendered Epithets and Literary Culture in the 1940s-- 3. High-Brows and Low-Brows: Squares, Beats, Hipsters, White Negroes, New Critics, and American Literary Culture in the 1950s-- 4. Reforming the Hard Body: The Old Left, the Counter Culture, and the Masculine Kulturkampf of the 1960s-- 5. The Gender Upheavals of the Late 1960s: The Black Panther Movement, Gay Liberation, and Radical Feminism Epilogue-- Notes-- Works Cited.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253355478 20160603
Masculinity was both a subtext and an explicit concern in the literary and political debates of the mid-20th century. In Pinks, Pansies, and Punks, James Penner charts the construction of masculinity within American literary culture from the 1930s to the 1970s. He examines the macho criticism that originated in the 1930s within the high modernist New York intellectual circle and tracks the issues of class struggle, anti-communism, and the clash between the Old and New Left in the 1960s. By extending literary culture to include not just novels, plays, and poetry, but diaries, journals, manifestos, essays, literary criticism, journalism, non-fiction, essays on psychology and sociology, and screenplays, Penner foregrounds the multiplicity of gender attitudes available in each of the historical moments he addresses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253355478 20160603
Pinks, Pansies, and Punks charts the construction of masculinity within American literary culture from the 1930s to the 1970s. Penner documents the emergence of "macho criticism, " and explores how debates about "hard" and "soft" masculinity influenced the class struggles of the 1930s, anti-communism in the 1940s and 1950s, and the clash between the Old Left and the New Left in the 1960s. By extending literary culture to include not just novels, plays, and poetry, but diaries, journals, manifestos, screenplays, and essays on psychology and sociology, Penner unveils the multiplicity of gender attitudes that emerge in each of the decades he addresses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253222510 20160603
Green Library

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