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1. 4:30 movie : poems [2018]

Book
79 pages ; 22 cm
In poems that are by turns intimate and wild, provocative and tender, award-winning poet Donna Masini explores personal loss, global violence, and the consolations of art. She brings her wit, grief, fury, and propulsive energy to bear on the preoccupations of our daily lives and our attempts to bargain with endings of every kind. Equal parts lament and praise, 4:30 Movie is fueled by despair and humor, governed by the ways in which movies enter our imaginations and frame our experiences. The movie theater becomes a presiding metaphor: part waiting room, part childhood, part underground depths where the self is a bit player, riding the subway with "its engine of extras." Masini's exquisite wordplay shows the mind wrestling ferociously to forestall grief, as if finding the right words might somehow allow us to extend our beautiful, foreshortened run.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393635508 20180702
Green Library
Book
241 pages ; 22 cm
Abracadabra is a fantastical and inventive addition to the tradition of noir writing, which not only delights and surprises at every turn but also raises important questions about identity, the human condition, the nature of evil, and the state of the union. The novel begins with a mystery, when Mark Goodson, a seemingly well-adjusted married man, disappears during a magic act, precipitating a series of events, encounters, and seemingly inexplicable occurrences, which it falls to a former professional football player, Elko Wells, to weave together into a story that is at once compelling and true. The concussion that ended Wells' playing career left him open to hearing voices and discerning patterns of meaning helpful to his work as the owner of a missing-persons agency. He also owns a celebrity look-alike agency, which complicates matters in humorous ways, and his reliance on a string of cocktail waitresses called the Bloody Marys who are on the lookout for various people adds another level of intrigue. Magicians and misdirection, gambling, down-on-one's-luck, the crazed sense of possibility and impossibility, mistaken identity, impersonators and body doubles, people acting bizarrely with all sorts of chaos, collisions, and overlaps thrown in for good measure. Again and again the reader is swept into treacherous waters, always confident that the writer is in control of his material. Because the many twists and turns the plot takes are all but impossible to anticipate, the experience of reading Abracadabra is deliciously magical.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781943859443 20180115
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

3. Acid West : essays [2018]

Book
395 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
  • SNM
  • The Light of God
  • Children of the Gadget
  • After the Fall
  • So Let All the Martians Come Home to Roost
  • Truth or Consequences at the Gateway to Space
  • Before the Fall
  • Raggedy, Raggedy Wabbitman
  • Living Room
  • Things Most Surely Believed
  • The Glitch in the Videogame Graveyard
  • Keep Alamogordo Beautiful
  • A Million Tiny Daggers.
"Early on July 16, 1945, Joshua Wheeler's great grandfather awoke to a flash, and then a long rumble: the world's first atomic blast filled the horizon north of his ranch in Alamogordo, New Mexico. Out on the range, the cattle had been bleached white by the fallout. Acid West, Wheeler's stunning debut collection of essays, is full of these mutated cows: vestiges of the Old West that have been transformed, suddenly and irrevocably, by innovation. Traversing the New Mexico landscape his family has called home for seven generations, Wheeler excavates and reexamines these oddities, assembling a cabinet of narrative curiosities: a man who steps from the stratosphere and free-falls to the desert; a treasure hunt for buried Atari video games; a village plagued by the legacy of atomic testing; a lonely desert spaceport; a UFO festival during the paranoid Summer of Snowden. The radical evolution of American identity, from cowboys to drone warriors to space explorers, is a story rooted in southern New Mexico. Acid West illuminates this history, clawing at the bounds of genre to reveal a place that is, for better or worse, home. By turns intimate, absurd, and frightening, Acid West is an enlightening deep-dive into a prophetic desert at the bottom of America" -- From Amazon.
"A rollicking debut book of essays that takes readers on a trip through the muck of American myths that have settled in the desert of our country's underbelly" -- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
195 pages ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 280 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Found in scores of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American narratives, the action-adventure heroine leaves the domestic space to pursue an independent adventure. This bold heroine tramps alone through the forests, demonstrates tremendous physical strength, braves dangers without hesitation, enters the public realm to earn money, and even kills her enemies when necessary. Despite her transgressions of social norms, the narrator portrays this heroine in a positive light and lauds her for her bravery and daring. The Action-Adventure Heroine offers a wide-ranging look at this enigmatic character in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American literature. Unlike the "tomboy" or the American frontierswoman, this more encompassing figure has been understudied until now. The action-adventure heroine has special relevance today, as scholars are forcefully challenging the once-dominant separate-spheres paradigm and offering alternative interpretations of gender conventions in nineteenth-century America. The hard-body action heroine in our contemporary popular culture is often assumed to be largely a product of the twentieth-century television and film industries (and therefore influenced by the women's movement); however, physically strong, agile, sometimes violent female figures have appeared in American popular culture and literature for a very long time. Smith analyzes captivity narratives, war narratives, stories of manifest destiny, dime novels, and tales of seduction to reveal the long literary history of female protagonists who step into traditionally masculine heroic roles to win the day. Smith's study includes such authors as Herman Mann, Mercy Otis Warren, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, E.D.E.N. Southworth, Edward L. Wheeler, and many more who are due for critical reassessment. In examining the female hero-with her strength, physicality, and violence-in eighteenth-and nineteenth-century American narratives, The Action-Adventure Heroine represents an important contribution to the field of American studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781621904090 20180702
Green Library
Book
221 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

7. Adjustment Day [2018]

Book
316 pages ; 25 cm
People pass the word only to those they trust most: Adjustment Day is coming. They've been reading a mysterious book and memorising its directives. They are ready for the reckoning. Adjustment Day, the author's first novel in four years, is an ingeniously comic tale in which Chuck Palahniuk does what he does best: skewer the absurdities in our society. Smug, geriatric politicians edge to the brink of a third World War in an effort to control the burgeoning population of young males; working-class men dream of burying the elites; and professors propound theories that offer students only the bleakest future. Into this dyspeptic time a blue-black book is launched carrying such wisdom as: The weak want you to forego your destiny just as they've shirked theirs. A smile is your best bulletproof vest. When Adjustment Day arrives, it inescapably spawns the logical conclusion of every separatist fantasy, alternative fact and conspiracy theory out there.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393652598 20180611
Green Library
Book
113 pages ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
21 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
154 pages ; 23 cm
Green Library
Book
205 pages ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
366 pages ; 22 cm
""Ridiculously good" (The New York Times) author Thomas Pierce's debut novel is a funny, poignant love story that answers the question: What happens after we die? (Lots of stuff, it turns out). Jim Byrd died. Technically. For a few minutes. The diagnosis: heart attack at age thirty. Revived with no memory of any tunnels, lights, or angels, Jim wonders what--if anything--awaits us on the other side. Then a ghost shows up. Maybe. Jim and his new wife, Annie, find themselves tangling with holograms, psychics, messages from the beyond, and a machine that connects the living and the dead. As Jim and Annie journey through history and fumble through faith, they confront the specter of loss that looms for anyone who dares to fall in love. Funny, fiercely original, and gracefully moving, The Afterliveswill haunt you. In a good way"-- Provided by publisher.
"A spiritual love story that asks the question: what happens after we die? Set in a parallel USA"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library

13. Aftermath [2018]

Book
83 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 102 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

15. Age of glass [2018]

Book
78 pages ; 21 cm
Green Library

16. Age of glass [2018]

Book
78 pages : portrait ; 21 cm
Green Library
Book
x, 253 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • An introduction: Rt. 66
  • The up-to-daters club
  • Student union
  • Loser
  • What is your quest?
  • Air traffic
  • The minority business consortium
  • Cartography
  • A moving violation
  • Marine boy
  • The wreck of the conquest
  • He ain't heavy
  • "Hurrah for Schoelcher!"
  • Colored people's time
  • Private school
  • Tolle, Lege
  • Behind the wheel
  • The strip
  • On Intervention.
"From the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, his first work of prose: a deeply felt memoir of a family's bonds and a meditation on race, addiction, fatherhood, ambition, and American culture The Pardlos were an average, middle-class African American family living in a New Jersey Levittown: charismatic Gregory Sr., an air traffic controller, his wife, and their two sons, bookish Greg Jr. and musical-talent Robbie. But when "Big Greg" loses his job after participating in the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Strike of 1981, he becomes a disillusioned, toxic, looming presence in the household--and a powerful rival for young Greg. While Big Greg succumbs to addiction and exhausts the family's money, Greg Jr. rebels--he joins a boot camp for prospective Marines, follows a woman to Denmark, drops out of college again and again, and yields to alcoholism. Years later, he falls for a beautiful, no-nonsense woman named Ginger and becomes a parent himself. Then, he finally grapples with the irresistible yet ruinous legacy of masculinity he inherited from his father. In chronicling his path to recovery and adulthood--Gregory Pardlo gives us a compassionate, loving ode to his father, to fatherhood, and to the frustrating-yet-redemptive ties of family, as well as a scrupulous, searing examination of how African American manhood is shaped by contemporary American life"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library

18. Alashka [2018]

Book
177 pages ; 23 cm.
Alashka is a lost book. It was first published as half of a very large, well-printed volume in 1979, spliced together with Tarn's Selected Poems up until that point. The publisher was a new outfit in Boulder, Colorado, called Brillig Works and born in an eponymous bookstore. Distribution was limited, and fitful, and copies were notoriously hard to come by. This ensured that what was, in effect, Janet Rodney's first collection, vanished from view. Also, although it was a valuable expansion of Tarn's anthro- and eco-poetics, this hardly registered in the wider world, whether in Alaska or in the lower states. The book finally gets its own set of covers here, and a chance to find its own niche, and will soon be joined by some other long-out-of-print Tarn volumes. Although some 40 years old, this book has scarcely aged, and its themes are as apposite today as they were in the 1970s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781848615854 20180409
Green Library
Book
977 pages : map ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxiii, 190 pages ; 23 cm
  • Monica McGoldrick: Foreword - Acknowledgments - Gail Shanley Corso: Alice McDermott: A Chronology of the Writer's Life - Gail Shanley Corso: Introduction: "What is not said than what is said?": Begorrah! - Segment One: Multidisciplinary Interpretations of Pretense and Lies in Alice McDermott's Fiction - Colleen McDonough: "Not what it seemed": Pretense and Identity in A Bigamist's Daughter - Martin LoMonaco - Understanding the Rhetoric of the Lie in Alice McDermott's Charming Billy: The Context of the Redemption Cycle and Irish-American Culture - Suzanne Mayer: The Narrator as Angelus Novus: Collective Memory, Truth, and Lies in Charming Billy - Segment Two: Dialogue and Silence as Forms of Communication in Alice McDermott's Fiction - Gail Shanley Corso: Go Ask Alice: Dialogue With Alice McDermott on May 10, 2011, at Johns Hopkins University Homewood Campus, Baltimore, Maryland - Edward Hagan: Narration as Experience of Simultaneity in Alice McDermott's Someone - Gail Shanley Corso: The Cry of the Banshee: The Keen of Pain and Loss in "I Am Awake" - Gail Shanley Corso/Colleen McDonough: Lois as Separate and Silent: Liberation From and Ambivalence to the Categorical Imperative in Alice McDermott's "Robert of the Desert" - Segment Three: Memory, Loss, and Trauma in Alice McDermott's Fiction - Suzanne Mayer: Celibate Bride, Shrewish Sage, and Fey Cousins: Intergenerational Trauma Among the Women of McDermott's Novels, Charmin Billy and Child of My Heart - Claudia Marie Kovach: Love and Grief: Recollection, Reiteration, and Replication in Alice McDermott's That Night - Appendix - Alice McDermott: Appendix A: "I Am Awake" - Alice McDermott: Appendix B: "Robert of the Desert" - Contributors - Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781433144165 20180604
In Alice McDermott's Fiction, contributors explore the emotional pain, the uncertainty about identity, and the faulty relationships within families and communities of characters in the writer's work. In the Foreword, Monica McGoldrick identifies how complications such characters as in McDermott's fiction experience often relate to "reverberations of the pain and shame of their Irish ancestors that have been silenced over time." The aftermath of lies, self-deception, and trauma are analyzed, and McDermott's themes, stylistics, and aesthetics are identified: familial relationships in second- and third-generation Irish-American families; trauma that characters experience when living their lives of repressed feelings or conflicted self-identity-or forgotten cultural identity; silence in families and inauthentic relationships between mothers and daughters; propensity for characters to lie to show care and concern for another and to cling to mythical images of a patriarchal hero; allusions to Catholic ritual and belief; conflict of female characters as they grapple with choice and autonomy; wit and farce as social commentary; craft with spontaneity and recursion in her narrative structures; emblematic use of peak moments as significant to memory; use of stealth narrators; use of allusions wryly to provide for an astute reader the intertextuality of her stories; repetitive metaphoric use of language to indirectly reveal truth; and, finally, focus on art or telling the story to compensate for sorrow from loss and death. As McDermott's characters grapple with their trauma and loss, the redemptive quality of the arts is identified.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781433144165 20180604
SAL3 (off-campus storage)