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Book
241 pages ; 22 cm
Abracadabra is a fantastical and inventive addition to the tradition of noir writing, which not only delights and surprises at every turn but also raises important questions about identity, the human condition, the nature of evil, and the state of the union. The novel begins with a mystery, when Mark Goodson, a seemingly well-adjusted married man, disappears during a magic act, precipitating a series of events, encounters, and seemingly inexplicable occurrences, which it falls to a former professional football player, Elko Wells, to weave together into a story that is at once compelling and true. The concussion that ended Wells' playing career left him open to hearing voices and discerning patterns of meaning helpful to his work as the owner of a missing-persons agency. He also owns a celebrity look-alike agency, which complicates matters in humorous ways, and his reliance on a string of cocktail waitresses called the Bloody Marys who are on the lookout for various people adds another level of intrigue. Magicians and misdirection, gambling, down-on-one's-luck, the crazed sense of possibility and impossibility, mistaken identity, impersonators and body doubles, people acting bizarrely with all sorts of chaos, collisions, and overlaps thrown in for good measure. Again and again the reader is swept into treacherous waters, always confident that the writer is in control of his material. Because the many twists and turns the plot takes are all but impossible to anticipate, the experience of reading Abracadabra is deliciously magical.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781943859443 20180115
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

2. Acid West : essays [2018]

Book
395 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
  • SNM
  • The Light of God
  • Children of the Gadget
  • After the Fall
  • So Let All the Martians Come Home to Roost
  • Truth or Consequences at the Gateway to Space
  • Before the Fall
  • Raggedy, Raggedy Wabbitman
  • Living Room
  • Things Most Surely Believed
  • The Glitch in the Videogame Graveyard
  • Keep Alamogordo Beautiful
  • A Million Tiny Daggers.
"Early on July 16, 1945, Joshua Wheeler's great grandfather awoke to a flash, and then a long rumble: the world's first atomic blast filled the horizon north of his ranch in Alamogordo, New Mexico. Out on the range, the cattle had been bleached white by the fallout. Acid West, Wheeler's stunning debut collection of essays, is full of these mutated cows: vestiges of the Old West that have been transformed, suddenly and irrevocably, by innovation. Traversing the New Mexico landscape his family has called home for seven generations, Wheeler excavates and reexamines these oddities, assembling a cabinet of narrative curiosities: a man who steps from the stratosphere and free-falls to the desert; a treasure hunt for buried Atari video games; a village plagued by the legacy of atomic testing; a lonely desert spaceport; a UFO festival during the paranoid Summer of Snowden. The radical evolution of American identity, from cowboys to drone warriors to space explorers, is a story rooted in southern New Mexico. Acid West illuminates this history, clawing at the bounds of genre to reveal a place that is, for better or worse, home. By turns intimate, absurd, and frightening, Acid West is an enlightening deep-dive into a prophetic desert at the bottom of America" -- From Amazon.
"A rollicking debut book of essays that takes readers on a trip through the muck of American myths that have settled in the desert of our country's underbelly" -- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
221 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
21 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
154 pages ; 23 cm
Green Library
Book
366 pages ; 22 cm
""Ridiculously good" (The New York Times) author Thomas Pierce's debut novel is a funny, poignant love story that answers the question: What happens after we die? (Lots of stuff, it turns out). Jim Byrd died. Technically. For a few minutes. The diagnosis: heart attack at age thirty. Revived with no memory of any tunnels, lights, or angels, Jim wonders what--if anything--awaits us on the other side. Then a ghost shows up. Maybe. Jim and his new wife, Annie, find themselves tangling with holograms, psychics, messages from the beyond, and a machine that connects the living and the dead. As Jim and Annie journey through history and fumble through faith, they confront the specter of loss that looms for anyone who dares to fall in love. Funny, fiercely original, and gracefully moving, The Afterliveswill haunt you. In a good way"-- Provided by publisher.
"A spiritual love story that asks the question: what happens after we die? Set in a parallel USA"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library

7. Alashka [2018]

Book
177 pages ; 23 cm.
Alashka is a lost book. It was first published as half of a very large, well-printed volume in 1979, spliced together with Tarn's Selected Poems up until that point. The publisher was a new outfit in Boulder, Colorado, called Brillig Works and born in an eponymous bookstore. Distribution was limited, and fitful, and copies were notoriously hard to come by. This ensured that what was, in effect, Janet Rodney's first collection, vanished from view. Also, although it was a valuable expansion of Tarn's anthro- and eco-poetics, this hardly registered in the wider world, whether in Alaska or in the lower states. The book finally gets its own set of covers here, and a chance to find its own niche, and will soon be joined by some other long-out-of-print Tarn volumes. Although some 40 years old, this book has scarcely aged, and its themes are as apposite today as they were in the 1970s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781848615854 20180409
Green Library
Book
977 pages : map ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
67 pages ; 22 cm
  • Fourteen
  • Moebius
  • Caldera
  • Building the Quabbin
  • Fourteen
  • Necropolis
  • Processional
  • Fourteen
  • Sakura
  • In the orchard
  • When the man talked around me, when he talked over me
  • Fourteen
  • Cafeteria tech
  • The woman pouring handfuls of ash
  • If it helps
  • Fourteen
  • Last composition
  • Sandusky Bay
  • Fourteen
  • To love men is to love what can kill you
  • Fourteen
  • Citizens killed by Vesuvius
  • Fourteen
  • Charleston / / Squaw Valley
  • National cemetery
  • Valentine (up top)
  • Fourteen
  • Patrick
  • Genre
  • Fourteen
  • How i lost you
  • The dead black girl doesn't care
  • Church and state of being
  • Fourteen
  • Pechakucha for suicides, seekers, and ecstatics
  • Submerge
  • Valentine (underground)
  • Fourteen
  • Heat and the sirens return
  • So the bell rings
  • The long walk home
  • Fourteen
  • Orvieto
  • Antrim Street
  • Power
  • Fourteen.
All Blue So Late presents the panorama of a young woman's life as she struggles to come to terms with her place in the world. These poems look to race, gender, and American identity, plumbing the individual's attendant grief, rage, and discomfort with these constructs.The skeleton of this fine collection is a series of direct addresses to the author's fourteen-year-old self, caught at the moment between girlhood and womanhood, when her perspective on everything suddenly changes. Swearingen-Steadwell's poetic adventures through worlds within and without reveal the restlessness of the seeker. They offer unabashed tenderness to anyone who reckons with solitude, and chases joy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810136342 20180205
Green Library
Book
66 pages : portrait ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
325 pages ; 25 cm
This is the tenderhearted story of a spirited young woman who tries to conquer her past amongst the glitz and glamour of 1960s Las Vegas-- and finds unexpected fortune, friendship, and love. When Lily Decker steps off the bus and onto the Las Vegas Strip, she is ready for a new life. Though her life is full of success, parties, newfound gal pals, and more money and luxuries than she ever thought possible, Lily is still restless. She changes her name to Ruby Wilde and finds work as a showgirl. When a passionate affair with a fiery photographer threatens to consume her, she will be forced to confront her deepest fears.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
373 pages ; 22 cm
"I hope you get drafted, I hope you go to Vietnam, I hope you get shot, and I hope you die there. Those words, spoken in the anger of youth, marked the end of the torrid 1960s college romance of Annette DuBose and Gabe Pender. She would marry a fellow antiwar activist and end up immigrating to Canada. He would fight in Vietnam and come home to build an American dream kind of life--a great career, a trophy wife, and a life of wealth and privilege. Forty years later, they have reconnected and discovered a shared passion: solo canoeing in Ontario's raw Quetico wilderness. They decide to meet again to get caught up on old times, but not in a restaurant or coffee shop--they agree to meet on an island deep in the Quetico wilds. Though they try to control their expectations for the rendezvous, they both approach the island with a growing realization of the emotional void in their lives and wonder how different everything might have been if they had spent their lives together. They must overcome challenges just to reach the island, then encounter the greatest challenges of all--each other, and a weather event for the ages. Alone on the Shield is a story about the Vietnam War and the things that connect us. It is the story of aging Baby Boomers, of the rare kinds of people who paddle alone into the wilderness, and of the kind of adventure that comes only to the bold and the brave"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
183 pages ; 22 cm
"The Amazing Mr. Morality features tenacious men and women whose determination to buck middle-class social convention draws them toward unforeseen challenges. A failed television producer insists upon having a woodchuck relocated from his lawn, only to receive desperate letters in which the woodchuck begs to return. An overconfident ne'er-do-well obtains a lucrative lecture invitation intended for a renowned ornithologist and decides to deliver the speech himself. An innocuous dispute over whether to rename a local street opens up racial fault lines that prove deadly. The collection concludes with the title novella in which two unscrupulous ethicists, writing rival newspaper columns, seek to unseat each other by addressing questions such as: If you're going to commit a murder, is it worse to kill when the victim is sleeping or awake?"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvii, 337 pages ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgments Introduction Summaries of Essays Part I: History Chapter One: Yone Noguchi's Invention of English-language Haiku Toru Kiuchi Chapter Two: Ezra Pound, Imagism, and Haiku Yoshinobu Hakutani Chapter Three: Mutual Influence between the American and the Japanese Haiku: The History of American Haiku Toshio Kimura Chapter Four: 100 Years of Haiku in the United States: An Overview Jim Kacian Chapter Five: Haiku in Higher Education: A Bibliography of Articles & Theses on Haiku Concluding with a Model of Teaching Haiku as Performance Learning Randy Brooks Part II: Criticism Chapter Six: Richard Wright's Haiku, Zen, and the African "Primal Outlook upon Life" Yoshinobu Hakutani Chapter Seven: Zen Buddhism in Richard Wright's Haiku Toru Kiuchi Chapter Eight: African American Haiku and Aesthetic Attitude John Zheng Chapter Nine: Jack Kerouac's Haiku and The Dharma Bums Yoshinobu Hakutani Chapter Ten: Sonia Sanchez's Morning Haiku and the Blues Heejung Kim Chapter Eleven: Those "Negro slaves, dark purple ripened plums": Black Atlantic Captives Revisited in Cane and Parodied in Jazz from the Haiku King Virginia W. Smith Chapter Twelve: Creating African American Haiku Form: Lenard D. Moore's Poetic Artistry Toru Kiuchi Chapter Thirteen: Cid Corman and Haiku: The Poetics of "Livingdying" Ce Rosenow Chapter Fourteen: Burnell Lippy's Haiku in Relation to Zen Bruce Ross Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498527170 20180416
American Haiku: New Readings explores the history and development of haiku by American writers, examining individual writers. In the late nineteenth century, Japanese poetry influenced through translation the French Symbolist poets, from whom British and American Imagist poets, Amy Lowell, Ezra Pound, T. E. Hulme, and John Gould Fletcher, received stimulus. Since the first English-language hokku (haiku) written by Yone Noguchi in 1903, one of the Imagist poet Ezra Pound's well-known haiku-like poem, "In A Station of the Metro, " published in 1913, is most influential on other Imagist and later American haiku poets. Since the end of World War II many Americans and Canadians tried their hands at writing haiku. Among them, Richard Wright wrote over four thousand haiku in the final eighteen months of his life in exile in France. His Haiku: This Other World, ed. Yoshinobu Hakutani and Robert L. Tener (1998), is a posthumous collection of 817 haiku Wright himself had selected. Jack Kerouac, a well-known American novelist like Richard Wright, also wrote numerous haiku. Kerouac's Book of Haikus, ed. Regina Weinreich (Penguin, 2003), collects 667 haiku. In recent decades, many other American writers have written haiku: Lenard Moore, Sonia Sanchez, James A. Emanuel, Burnell Lippy, and Cid Corman. Sonia Sanchez has two collections of haiku: Like the Singing Coming off the Drums (Boston: Beacon Press, 1998) and Morning Haiku (Boston: Beacon Press, 2010). James A. Emanuel's Jazz from the Haiku King (Broadside Press, 1999) is also a unique collection of haiku. Lenard Moore, author of his haiku collections The Open Eye (1985), has been writing and publishing haiku for over 20 years and became the first African American to be elected as President of the Haiku Society of America. Burnell Lippy's haiku appears in the major American haiku journals, Where the River Goes: The Nature Tradition in English-Language Haiku (2013). Cid Corman is well-known not only as a haiku poet but a translator of Japanese ancient and modern haiku poets: Santoka, Walking into the Wind (Cadmus Editions, 1994).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498527170 20180416
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 227 pages ; 22 cm
"In this singular collection, John Edgar Wideman, the acclaimed author of Writing to Save a Life, blends the personal, historical, and political to invent complex, charged stories about love, death, struggle, and what we owe each other. With characters ranging from everyday Americans to Jean-Michel Basquiat to Nat Turner, American Histories is a journey through time, experience, and the soul of our country"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
viii, 283 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments American Literature as World Literature: An Introduction Jeffrey R. Di Leo (University of Houston-Victoria, USA) Part 1: World, Worldings, Worldliness 1. American Literature and Its Shadow Worlds: Henry James, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Specters of Worldliness Paul Giles (University of Sydney, Australia) 2. Worldings of American Literature Off the Cultural Radar Lawrence Buell (Harvard University, USA) 3. Who Needs American Literature? From Emerson to Marcus and Sollors Jeffrey R. Di Leo (University of Houston-Victoria, USA) Part 2: Literature, Geopolitics, Globalization 4. Worlds of Americana Peter Hitchcock (City University of New York, USA) 5. Political Serials: Tanner '88 to House of Cards Emily Apter (New York University, USA) 6. Weltliterature? Mapping American Literature after Territorialism: Manifesto for a 21st-Century Critical Agenda Christian Moraru (University of North Carolina, Greensboro, USA) 7. Amitav Ghosh's Ibis Trilogy in American World Literature Jonathan Arac (University of Pittsburgh, USA) Part 3: Experience, Poetics, New Worlds 8. Whitman's Polyvocal Poetic Revolution: Equality and Empire in New World Literature Gabriel Rockhill (Villanova University, USA) 9. Experience to Experiment, SIgns to Signals: Towards Flusser's New World Aaron Jaffe (Florida State University, USA) 10. Un-Making American Literature: Mind-Making Fictions of the Literary Alan Singer (Temple University, USA) Part 4: History and the American Novel 11. Last American Stories and Their Adventurous Sequels Robert Caserio (Penn State University, USA) 12. Transhuman Poetics and American World Literature: James Baldwin's Demon of History in Just Above My Head Daniel O'Hara (Temple University, USA) 13. The Pathos of History: Trauma in Siri Hustvedt's The Sorrows of an American Jean-Michel Rabate (University of Pennsylvania, USA) Notes on Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781501332272 20180219
For better or worse, America lives in the age of "worlded" literature. Not the world literature of nations and nationalities considered from most powerful and wealthy to the least. And not the world literature found with a map. Rather, the worlded literature of individuals crossing borders, mixing stories, and speaking in dialect. Where translation struggles to be effective and background is itself another story. The "worlded" literature of the multinational corporate publishing industry where the global market is all. The essays in this collection, from some of the most distinguished figures in American studies and literature, explore what it means to consider American literature as world literature.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781501332272 20180219
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xx, 417 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Chronology: 1910-1920-- Introduction: revolution, progress, and reaction in the first decade of American modernism Mark W. Van Wienen-- Part I. Themes: 1. The city: modern poetics and metropolitan life John Timberman Newcomb-- 2. The country: myth and reality, affirmation and reform Janet Galligani Casey-- 3. Indian country: between native claims and modernist desires Beth H. Piatote-- 4. Labor: the Lawrence strike in poetry and public opinion John Marsh-- 5. The color line: racial inequality in the literary field Michael Nowlin-- 6. The new woman: narrating the histor(ies) of the feminist movement Francesca Sawaya-- 7. Eugenics: bad blood and better babies Beth Widmaier Capo-- 8. Bohemians: Greenwich Village and 'the masses' Joanna Levin-- 9. Americanism: assimilation and the 'immigrant question' Cathy J. Schlund-Vials-- 10. Masculinity: regenerative primitivism as cultural compensation Jonathan Vincent-- 11. Revolution: imagining a counternarrative Laura Hapke-- Part II. Formats: 12. Modernist poetry: or, the growing taste for the lower kinds of poetry Robin G. Schulze-- 13. Modernist fiction: women's writing and cultural emergence Guy Reynolds-- 14. Realist drama: from the little theatre to Broadway Brenda Murphy-- 15. Realist fiction: a resilient mode Robin Peel-- 16. Roots and popular music: literary encounters with jazz and blues Tim A. Ryan-- 17. Popular verse: poetry in motion Mike Chasar-- 18. Sports writing: a foundational decade Scott D. Emmert-- 19. Manifestos: anti-foundationalism in avant-garde, feminist, and African-American modernisms Laura Ann Winkiel-- Part III. Institutions: 20. Little magazines: aesthetics and dissent Jayne E. Marek-- 21. The movies: the transitional era Charlie Keil-- 22. The academy: potential and constraint Cary Nelson-- 23. The presidency: Woodrow Wilson and the reinvention of executive power Sean McCann-- 24. The war: event and institution Mark W. Van Wienen-- Works cited-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107143302 20180312
American Literature in Transition, 1910-1920 offers provocative new readings of authors whose innovations are recognized as inaugurating Modernism in US letters, including Robert Frost, Willa Cather, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, H. D., and Marianne Moore. Gathering the voices of both new and established scholars, the volume also reflects the diversity and contradictions of US literature of the 1910s. 'Literature' itself is construed variously, leading to explorations of jazz, the movies, and political writing as well as little magazines, lantern slides, and sports reportage. One section of thematic essays cuts across genre boundaries. Another section oriented to formats drills deeply into the workings of specific media, genres, or forms. Essays on institutions conclude the collection, although a critical mass of contributors throughout explore long-term literary and cultural trends - where political repression, race prejudice, war, and counterrevolution are no less prominent than experimentation, progress, and egalitarianism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107143302 20180312
Green Library
Book
xxiii, 356 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Part I. The United States in the World: 1. Why We Fight: contending narratives of the Second World War Christopher Vials-- 2. Human rights in American political discourse Glenn Mitoma-- 3. Fictions of anti-semitism and the beginning of Holocaust literature Josh Lambert-- 4. The fatal machine: the postwar imperial state and the radical novel Benjamin Balthaser-- 5. Antifascism as a political grammar and cultural force Christopher Vials-- 6. From confession to exposure: transitions in anticommunist literature Alex Goodall-- 7. The contested origins of the Atomic Age and the Cold War Christian Appy-- Part II. Emergent Publics: 8. Cross currents: WWII and the increasing visibility of race Bill Mullen-- 9. Good Asian/bad Asian: Asian American racial formation Floyd Cheung-- 10. Social realism, the Ghetto, and African American literature James Smethurst-- 11. From factory to home? The crisis in the gendered division of labor Julia L. Mickenberg-- 12. Public excursions in fierce truth-telling: literary cultures and homosexuality Aaron Lecklider-- 13. Resurgence: conservatives organize against the new deal Kathy Olmsted-- Part III. Media and Genre: 14. Late modernisms, latent realisms: the politics of literary interpretation Sarah Ehlers-- 15. The city in the literary imagination Sean McCann-- 16. Noir and the ebb of radical hope Alan Wald-- 17. Narrating the war Philip Beidler-- 18. Paperbacks and the literary marketplace Erin Smith-- 19. Literary radicals in Radio's public sphere Judith Smith-- 20. The state cultural apparatus: federal funding of arts and letters Joan Saab.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107143319 20180403
In the aftermath of World War II, the United States emerged as the dominant imperial power, and in US popular memory, the Second World War is remembered more vividly than the American Revolution. American Literature in Transition, 1940-1950 provides crucial contexts for interpreting the literature of this period. Essays from scholars in literature, history, art history, ethnic studies, and American studies show how writers intervened in the global struggles of the decade: the Second World War, the Cold War, and emerging movements over racial justice, gender and sexuality, labor, and de-colonization. One recurrent motif is the centrality of the political impulse in art and culture. Artists and writers participated widely in left and liberal social movements that fundamentally transformed the terms of social life in the twentieth century, not by advocating specific legislation, but by changing underlying cultural values. This book addresses all the political impulses fueling art and literature at the time, as well as the development of new forms and media, from modernism and noir to radio and the paperback.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107143319 20180403
Green Library
Book
ix, 402 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction Rachel Greenwald Smith-- Part I. Formal Transitions: 1. 'Post'-ethnic form Elda Maria Roman-- 2. Gender, sexuality, and new queer forms T. Jackie Cuevas-- 3. Formally conventional fiction Adam Kelly-- 4. Literary genre fiction Andrew Hoberek-- 5. New wave fabulism and hybrid science fictions Kate Marshall-- 6. The televisual novel Phillip Maciak-- Part II. The Return of Authenticity: 7. Neorealist fiction Lee Konstantinou-- 8. Memoir Daniel Worden-- 9. Historical fiction and the end of history Mitchum Huehls-- 10. Literature after 9/11 Georgiana Banita-- 11. The neuronovel Stephen J. Burn-- Part III. Digital Revolutions: 12. Information Lindsay Thomas-- 13. Electronic literature Brian Kim Stefans-- 14. Social networks Scott Selisker-- 15. Conceptual writing Jennifer Ashton-- Part IV. Transnational Currents: 16. Financialization Annie McClanahan-- 17. Borders and migrations Emilio Sauri-- 18. War on terror Timothy Melley-- Part V. The Ecological Turn: 19. New directions in ecocriticism Janet Fiskio and Sophia Bamert-- 20. Climate change fiction Matthew Schneider-Mayerson-- 21. Ecopoetics Jonathan Skinner-- Part VI. Institutional Shifts: 22. Little magazines, blogs, and literary media Evan Kindley-- 23. Publishing in the age of Amazon Loren Glass-- 24. Creative writing, cultural studies, and the university Eric Bennett-- Afterword: the 2000s after 2016 Rachel Greenwald Smith.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107149298 20180403
American Literature in Transition, 2000-2010 illuminates the dynamic transformations that occurred in American literary culture during the first decade of the twenty-first century. The volume is the first major critical collection to address the literature of the 2000s, a decade that saw dramatic changes in digital technology, economics, world affairs, and environmental awareness. Beginning with an introduction that takes stock of the period's major historical, cultural, and literary movements, the volume features accessible essays on a wide range of topics, including genre fiction, the treatment of social networking in literature, climate change fiction, the ascendency of Amazon and online booksellers, 9/11 literature, finance and literature, and the rise of prestige television. Mapping the literary culture of a decade of promise and threat, American Literature in Transition, 2000-2010 provides an invaluable resource on twenty-first century American literature for general readers, students, and scholars alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107149298 20180403
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
308 pages ; 24 cm
"Newlyweds Celestial and Roy, the living embodiment of the New South, are settling into the routine of their life together when Roy is sent to prison for a crime he didn't commit. An insightful look into the lives of people who are bound and separated by forces beyond their control"--.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781616201340 20180226
Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive, and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime Celestial knows he didn't commit. Though fiercely independent, Celestial finds herself bereft and unmoored, taking comfort in Andre, her childhood friend, and best man at their wedding. As Roy's time in prison passes, she is unable to hold on to the love that has been her center. After five years, Roy's conviction is suddenly overturned, and he returns to Atlanta ready to resume their life together.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781616208776 20180226
Green Library