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Book
x, 129 pages : illustration ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
xi, 264 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
vii, 297 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • CONTENTS List of Figures Introduction Monika M. Elbert and Susanne Schmid PART I: Nationalism and Imperialism: The Hotel as Guidepost to National Interests 1 The Moral Economy of the Irish Hotel from the Union to the Famine Melissa Fegan 2 English Inns and Hotels in Nineteenth-Century Fiction Susanne Schmid 3 American Accommodation: Transatlantic Travel, Boardinghouse Settlers, and Hotel Culture Tamara S. Wagner Part II: The Mundane vs the Supernatural: Domesticity, Danger, or Mystery in Hotels 4 Hawthorne and Hotels in Great Britain Frederick Newberry 5 A Tomb with a View: Supernatural Experiences in the Late Nineteenth Century's Egyptian Hotels Eleanor Dobson 6 Dark Hostelries: Gothic Hotels and Inns in the Long Nineteenth Century Laurence Davies PART III: From Comfort to Capitalist Excess: The Evolving Hotel Experience as Status Symbol 7 The Waldorf-Astoria and New York Society: Grand Hotel as Site of Modernity Annabella Fick 8 Henry James and "the testimony of the hotel" to Transatlantic Encounters Maureen E. Montgomery 9 Gilded-Age Hotel Culture and the Construction of American Leisure-Class Identity Grace Tirapelle PART IV: Assignations, Trysts, and Memorable Encounters in Hotels 10 The Inns of Romantic Drama Frederick Burwick 11 George Eliot and George Henry Lewes: Respectable Adultery and Anonymous Celebrity Kathleen McCormack 12 Edith Wharton's American and French Hotels: A Permeable Private/Public Space Carole M. Shaffer-Koros PART V: Women's Travels and the Hotel as Nexus between Private and Public Realms 13 "A Continual Recurrence of Bad Inns": Public Domesticity and Women's Travel in the Early Nineteenth Century Pam Perkins 14 "I was in a fidget to know where we could possibly sleep": Antebellum Hospitality on the Margins of Nation in Caroline Kirkland's A New Home, Who'll Follow? and Eliza Farnham's Life in Prairie Land Michelle Gaffner Wood 15 Afterword Kevin J. James List of Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138675902 20171023
This volume examines the hotel experience of Anglo-American travelers in the nineteenth century from the viewpoint of literary and cultural studies as well as spatiality theory. Focusing on the social and imaginary space of the hotel in fiction, periodicals, diaries, and travel accounts, the essays shed new light on nineteenth-century notions of travel writing. Analyzing the liminal space of the hotel affords a new way of understanding the freedoms and restrictions felt by travelers from different social classes and nations. As an environment that forced travelers to reimagine themselves or their cultural backgrounds, the hotel could provide exhilarating moments of self-discovery or dangerous feelings of alienation. It could prove liberating to the tourist seeking an escape from prescribed gender roles or social class constructs. The book addresses changing notions of nationality, social class, and gender in a variety of expansive or oppressive hotel milieu: in the private space of the hotel room and in the public spaces (foyers, parlors, dining areas). Sections address topics including nationalism and imperialism; the mundane vs. the supernatural; comfort and capitalist excess; assignations, trysts, and memorable encounters in hotels; and women's travels. The book also offers a brief history of inns and hotels of the time period, emphasizing how hotels play a large role in literary texts, where they frequently reflect order and disorder in a personal and/or national context. This collection will appeal to scholars in literature, travel writing, history, cultural studies, and transnational studies, and to those with interest in travel and tourism, hospitality, and domesticity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138675902 20171023
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4. As you like it [2018]

Book
x, 228 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction: this strange, eventful history 1 Play, parts and players 2 Hunting for Arden in Warwickshire 3 Materials of performance: denim and silk 4 Between France and Germany 5 At all points like a man 6 Woeful pageants 7 As we like it Appendix: Major actors and staff for productions discussed in this volume Index -- .
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780719086939 20171227
This book examines the modern performance history of one of Shakespeare's best-loved and most enduring comedies, and one that has given opportunities for generations of theatre-makers and theatre-goers to explore the pleasures of pastoral, gender masquerade and sexual ambiguity. Powered by Shakespeare's greatest female comic role, the play invites us into a deeply English woodland that has also been richly imagined as a space of dreams. The study retrieves the untold stories of stage productions in Britain, France and Germany, which include Royal Shakespeare Company productions starring Vanessa Redgrave, Eileen Atkins and Juliet Stevenson, the ground-breaking all-male productions at the National Theatre in 1967 and by Cheek by Jowl in 1992, and the versions directed by Jacques Copeau in Paris in 1934, and by Peter Stein in Berlin in 1977. It also addresses the four major screen versions of the play, ranging from Paul Czinner's 1936 film to Kenneth Branagh's seventy years later. -- .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780719086939 20171227
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Book
x, 203 pages ; 22 cm
  • At the base camp : imagining
  • First climb : wisdom
  • First crossroad : knowledge
  • Second climb : meaningful action
  • Second crossroad : purchase
  • Third climb : meaningless action
  • Third crossroad : place
  • Fourth climb : receiving
  • Fourth crossroad : needs
  • Fifth climb : gratitude
  • Fifth crossroad : sin
  • At the summit.
Green Library
Book
ix, 230 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 215 pages ; 24 cm.
  • CONTENTS: Introduction: Inequality for All Chapter One: Feathers, Wings, and Souls Chapter Two: The Creaturely Continuum in A Midsummer Night's Dream Chapter Three: The Lively Creaturely/Object World of The Rape of Lucrece Chapter Four: Falstaff and "the Modern Constitution" Chapter Five: The Winter's Tale's Pedestrian and Elite Creatures Conclusion: Human Grandiosity/ Human Responsibility Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138673007 20171002
This book explores how humans in the Renaissance lived with, attended to, and considered the minds, feelings, and sociality of other creatures. It examines how Renaissance literature and natural history display an unequal creaturely world: all creatures were categorized hierarchically. However, post-Cartesian readings of Shakespeare and other Renaissance literature have misunderstood Renaissance hierarchical creaturely relations, including human relations. Using critical animal studies work and new materialist theory, Bach argues that attending closely to creatures and objects in texts by Shakespeare and other writers exposes this unequal world and the use and abuse of creatures, including people. The book also adds significantly to animal studies by showing how central bird sociality and voices were to Renaissance human culture, with many believing that birds were superior to humans in song, caregiving, and companionship. Bach shows how Descartes, a central figure in the transition to modern ideas about creatures, lived isolated from humans and other creatures and denied ancient knowledge about other creatures' minds, especially bird minds. As significantly, Bach shows how and why Descartes's ideas appealed to human grandiosity. Asking how Renaissance categorizations of creatures differ so much from modern classifications and why those modern classifications have shaped so much Animal Studies work, this book offers significant new readings of Shakespeare's and other Renaissance texts. It will contribute to a range of fields including Renaissance Literature, History, Animal Studies, New Materialism, and the Environmental Humanities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138673007 20171002
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Book
338 pages ; 25 cm
"For readers of Khaled Hosseini and Chris Cleave, The Boat People is an extraordinary novel about a group of refugees who survive a perilous ocean voyage only to face the threat of deportation amid accusations of terrorism When a rusty cargo ship carrying Mahindan and five hundred fellow refugees from Sri Lanka's bloody civil war reaches Vancouver's shores, the young father thinks he and his six-year-old son can finally start a new life. Instead, the group is thrown into a detention processing center, with government officials and news headlines speculating that among the "boat people" are members of a separatist militant organization responsible for countless suicide attacks--and that these terrorists now pose a threat to Canada's national security. As the refugees become subject to heavy interrogation, Mahindan begins to fear that a desperate act taken in Sri Lanka to fund their escape may now jeopardize his and his son's chance for asylum. Told through the alternating perspectives of Mahindan; his lawyer, Priya, a second-generation Sri Lankan Canadian who reluctantly represents the refugees; and Grace, a third-generation Japanese Canadian adjudicator who must decide Mahindan's fate as evidence mounts against him, The Boat People is a spellbinding and timely novel that provokes a deeply compassionate lens through which to view the current refugee crisis"-- Provided by publisher.
"A debut novel about a thirty-five-year-old Sri Lankan refugee who has survived the harrowing experiences of civil war, a prison camp, and a perilous ocean voyage to Canada -- but his journey has only begun, as he and his young son navigate the morass of the refugee system"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
ix, 289 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface.- Introduction: Byron and Ecocriticism.- Chapter One: Byron's Cultural Ecology.- Chapter Two: Natural and Aesthetic Theology.- Chapter Three: Metaphysical Doubts, the Logic of Domination, and the Ecology of Freedom.- Chapter Four: Don Juan's Autre-Mondialisation.- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319542379 20171127
This book is a thorough, eco-critical re-evaluation of Lord Byron (1789-1824), claiming him as one of the most important ecological poets in the British Romantic tradition. Using political ecology, post-humanist theory, new materialism, and ecological science, the book shows that Byron's major poems-Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, the metaphysical dramas, and Don Juan-are deeply engaged with developing a cultural ecology that could account for the co-creative synergies in human and natural systems, and ground an emancipatory ecopolitics and ecopoetics scaled to address globalized human threats to socio-environmental thriving in the post-Waterloo era. In counterpointing Byron's eco-cosmopolitanism to the localist dwelling praxis advocated by Romantic Lake poets, Byron's Nature seeks to enlarge our understanding of the extraordinary range, depth, and importance of Romanticism's inquiry into the meaning of nature and our ethical relation to it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319542379 20171127
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 219 pages ; 24 cm
"Bram Stoker's Dracula is the most famous vampire in literature and film. This new collection of sixteen essays brings together a range of internationally renowned scholars to provide a series of pathways through this celebrated Gothic novel and its innumerable adaptations and translations. The volume illuminates the novel's various pre-histories, critical contexts and subsequent cultural transformations. Chapters explore literary history, Gothic revival scholarship, folklore, anthropology, psychology, sexology, philosophy, occultism, cultural history, critical race theory, theatre and film history, and the place of the vampire in Europe and beyond. These studies provide an accessible guide of cutting-edge scholarship to one of the most celebrated modern Gothic horror stories. This Companion will serve as a key resource for scholars, teachers and students interested in the enduring force of Dracula and the seemingly inexhaustible range of the contexts it requires and readings it might generate."-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library

11. The Chawton letters [2018]

Book
128 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 20 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 248 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Civility
  • A glimpse of social war
  • A nexus of fratricide
  • The long civil war
  • Civilizing mission
  • Civil war, the highest stage of civilization
  • Civil war, the lowest stage of civilization
  • Incivility
  • A bend in the historical novel
  • Postcolonial interregnum
  • Coda: Global civil war.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 340 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: What Did Coleridge Do in Gottingen? 1. Oxbridge and Gottingen: Confessional Provincialism and Cosmopolitan Intellectualismã 2. Full Child of my Own Brain: Planning the German Tour ã 3. The Cosmopolitan Intellectualism of Gottingen ã ã 4. Coleridge and the Gottingen Research Libraryã ã ã 5. Continental Research Processes and the Projected Life of Lessing ã 6. Instant Failure and Delayed Success: Continental Intellectualism and the English Public Sphere, 1799-1804ã Conclusion: The Legacy of Gottingen.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472472380 20171227
Viewing Samuel Taylor Coleridge's pursuit of continental intellectualism through the lens of cosmopolitanism, Maximiliaan van Woudenberg examines the so-called 'German Mania' of the writer in the context of the intellectual history of the university. At a time when the confessional model of Oxbridge precluded a liberal education in England, van Woudenberg argues, Coleridge's pursuit of continental methodologies and networks encountered at the University of Gottingen anticipated the foundation of the modern von Humboldt research-university model. Founded by the Hanoverian rulers of Great Britain, this cosmopolitan institution of knowledge successfully fostered cross-cultural interchange between German and British intellectuals during the latter half of the eighteenth century. van Woudenberg links the origins of Coleridge's engagement with European intellectualism to his first encounter with the innovations of a Reform university during his studies at the University of Gottingen in 1799, a period that many critics and biographers believe spoiled his poetry. Drawing on hitherto unexamined primary records and documents in German Kurrentschrift, this study shows Coleridge to be a visionary whose cross-cultural dissemination of continental intellectualism in England was ahead of its time and presents an intriguing episode in Cosmopolitan Romanticism by a major canonical figure.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472472380 20171227
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Book
208 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
ix, 462 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
xvi, 398 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
vi, 243 pages : illustrations (some color), color maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
280 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: The Question of Identity in Harold Pinter's Drama Chapter One: Strong Arm Her: Gendered Identity in Harold Pinter's A Kind of Alaska (1982) Chapter Two: The Indelible Memory: Memorial Identity in Harold Pinter's Ashes to Ashes (1996) Chapter Three: Eroded Rhetoric: Linguistic Identity in Harold Pinter's One for the Road (1984) and Mountain Language (1988) Chapter Four: Chic Dictatorship: Power and Political Identity in Harold Pinter's Party Time (1991) Chapter Five: The Ethic and Aesthetic of Existence: Sexual Identity in Harold Pinter's Betrayal (1978) Chapter Six: Crumbling Families: Familial and Marital Identity in Harold Pinter's Celebration (2000) Conclusion Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138080195 20171218
Let down by the uncertainties of memory, language, and their own family units, the characters in Harold Pinter's plays endure persistent struggles to establish their own identities. Eroding the Language of Freedom re-examines how identity is shaped in these plays, arguing that the characters' failure to function as active members of society speaks volumes to Pinter's ideological preoccupation with society's own inadequacies. Pinter described himself as addressing the state of the world through his plays, and in the linguistic games, emotional balancing acts, and recurring scenarios through which he put his characters, readers and audiences can see how he perceived that world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138080195 20171218
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 217 pages ; 24 cm
  • 'Expression' --'No harmonious philosophy'
  • 'Souls unreconciled to life': Hardy and music
  • 'Tune and thought': the uses of music in Hardy's poetry
  • 'Music and context': Hardy's poetry and fiction
  • 'A strange respect for the individual': Gilles Deleuze and Hardy the novelist
  • 'What I see in their faces': facial inspiration in Hardy's fiction
  • 'Metre and context': Hardy's "neutral tones"
  • 'Metre and mourning': "The going" and poems of 1912-13
  • 'Hardy's two voices' "The oxen", metre and belief.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
201 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgements Introduction: Styling Faith 1. William Blake: Destabilized Particulars 2. Alfred Tennyson: Word Music 3. Christina G. Rossetti: Practically Perfect 4. Gerard M. Hopkins: Counter Stress 5. T. S. Eliot: Failing Better Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474234078 20180115
In this ambitious book, Michael D. Hurley explores how five great writers - William Blake, Alfred Tennyson, Christina Rossetti, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and T. S. Eliot - engaged their religious faith in poetry, with a view to asking why they chose that literary form in the first place. What did they believe poetry could say or do that other kinds of language or expression could not? And how might poetry itself operate as a unique mode of believing? These deep questions meet at the crossroads of poetics and metaphysics, and the writers considered here offer different answers. But these writers also collectively shed light on the interplay between literature and theology across the long nineteenth century, at a time when the authority and practice of both was being fiercely reimagined.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474234078 20180115
SAL3 (off-campus storage)