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1. 1979 [2018]

Book
317 pages ; 21 cm
It's 1979 and Tom Buzby is thirteen years old and living in the small working- class city of Chatham, Ontario. So far, so normal. Except that Tom's dad is the local tattoo artist, his mother is a born-again former stripper who's run off with the minister from the church where the pet store used to be, and his sister can't wait to leave town for good. And everyone along his daily newspaper route looks at him a little differently, this boy who's come back from the dead, who just might be the only one who understands the miraculous, heart-breaking mystery that is their lives. Set in the year that real newspaper headlines told of North America's hard turn to the right, 1979 offers a smalltown take on the buried lives of those who almost never make the news, and one boy's attempt to make sense of it all.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781771960960 20180508
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

2. Acceptance [2018]

Book
55 pages ; 20 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 258 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Preface Introduction. Addiction in (Early) Modernity Chapter 1. Scholarly Addiction in Doctor Faustus Chapter 2. Addicted Love in Twelfth Night Chapter 3. Addicted Fellowship in Henry IV Chapter 4. Addiction and Possession in Othello Chapter 5. Addictive Pledging from Shakespeare and Jonson to Cavalier Verse Epilogue. Why Addiction? Notes Works Cited Index Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249965 20180416
Rebecca Lemon illuminates a previously-buried conception of addiction, as a form of devotion at once laudable, difficult, and extraordinary, that has been concealed by the persistent modern link of addiction to pathology. Surveying sixteenth-century invocations, she reveals how early moderns might consider themselves addicted to study, friendship, love, or God. However, she also uncovers their understanding of addiction as a form of compulsion that resonates with modern scientific definitions. Specifically, early modern medical tracts, legal rulings, and religious polemic stressed the dangers of addiction to alcohol in terms of disease, compulsion, and enslavement. Yet the relationship between these two understandings of addiction was not simply oppositional, for what unites these discourses is a shared emphasis on addiction as the overthrow of the will. Etymologically, "addiction" is a verbal contract or a pledge, and even as sixteenth-century audiences actively embraced addiction to God and love, writers warned against commitment to improper forms of addiction, and the term became increasingly associated with disease and tyranny. Examining canonical texts including Doctor Faustus, Twelfth Night, Henry IV, and Othello alongside theological, medical, imaginative, and legal writings, Lemon traces the variety of early modern addictive attachments. Although contemporary notions of addiction seem to bear little resemblance to its initial meanings, Lemon argues that the early modern period's understanding of addiction is relevant to our modern conceptions of, and debates about, the phenomenon.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812249965 20180416
Green Library

4. Adulterants [2018]

Book
173 pages ; 23 cm
Green Library
Book
xxii, 499 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
A.E. Housman (1859-1936) was both a celebrated poet and the foremost classicist of his day. His poetry was set to music by numerous composers including Arthur Somervell, Ralph Vaughan Williams, George Butterworth, Ivor Gurney, John Ireland and Samuel Barber. Housman's painstaking vocation, to restore classical manuscripts by correcting textual errors, took up virtually the whole of his working life. A seemingly inaccessible, aloof man, he never set out to be a professional poet, yet poetry poured out of him and became his monument. His renowned A Shropshire Lad and Last Poems were born of an inner crisis, sparked by a profound but unreciprocated attachment for a fellow undergraduate. To be sexually different in the time of Oscar Wilde was to invite ostracism and disgust. This fact, allied with his secretiveness and penchant for irony, reinforced his reticence on personal matters. Until now, he has remained a hidden personality, held in the public mind as prim and grim. This biography reveals by contrast a man of many facets, one companionable in small groups, generous to a fault, and always on the lookout for humour and fun; a master of English prose; a witty and compelling after-dinner speaker; an occasional writer of nonsense verse; a frequenter of the music hall; an intrepid early traveller by air; and a connoisseur of food and wine. Drawing on Housman's published letters and on 81 significant new finds, Edgar Vincent conjures up a new Housman, created out of his reactions to the events of his life as he experienced them. It weaves together his scholarly life and the biographical elements in his poetry to examine his emotional and sexual needs with dispassion and empathy and to uncover his hidden sensibilities and creative world. EDGAR VINCENT read English at St Catherine's College, Oxford. Following Oxford he was commissioned in the Navy, spending most of his time with the Royal Marines. Subsequently he worked for Imperial Chemical Industries for thirty years. He then fulfilled a life-long ambition to write his book Nelson: Love & Fame, published by Yale University Press in 2003. The book was shortlisted for the BBC 4 Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction, was a New York Times Notable Book and was named one of Atlantic Monthly's Books of the Year.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783272419 20180403
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 129 pages : illustration ; 24 cm
  • Introduction 1. Modernism Reconsidered/ Reconsidering Modernism 2. Politics, Sex, and Identity in Lady Chatterley's Lover 3. Private and Public Self: Ideology of the Aesthetic in Mrs. Dalloway 4. To the Lighthouse-Structure Hidden Behind `Chaotic' Narrative Technique 5. Politics of Multiple Identities in Orlando 6. Aesthetics of Disorder in The Waste Land 7. Aesthetics of Nihilism: Convention in the Service of Ideology inT. S. Eliot's Four Quartets 8. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498528054 20180205
Scrutinizing the aesthetic and ideological in the works by Lawrence, Woolf, and Eliot, this book gives a different perspective on Modernism and what are considered to be its principal features. In that respect, fragmentation, disunity, relativity of things, break with tradition, as well as the depiction of life's disorder, are disputed and seen as aesthetic means for the promotion of certain ideologies. Aesthetics and Ideology of D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, and T. S. Eliot offers a smooth transition from general discussion and revision of some fixed concepts related to Modernism, through individual authors and their major works to the conclusion where the main findings are summarized and further explicated. Apart from dealing with Modernism in general, Aesthetics and Ideology of D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf and T. S. Eliot presents a somewhat different view on the authors it deals with. They are not only seen as opponents of established religious, political, and social views, but to a certain extent as their perpetrators. This duality concerning their stances is reconciled by their insisting on the aesthetic unity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498528054 20180205
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 264 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • PART I INTRODUCTION 1 Introduction Katherine Wakely-Mulroney and Louise Joy ã PART II FORM 2 Rhythm Derek Attridge 3 Free Play Revisited: the Poetics of Repetition in Blake's Songs of Innocence Corinna Russell 4 Play James Williams 5 Poetry in Prose: Lewis Carroll's Sylvie and Bruno Books Katherine Wakely-Mulroney 6 The Rational Gothic: The Case of Ann Taylor's "The Hand-Post" Donelle Ruwe ã PART III EMBODIMENT 7 The Laughing Child: Children's Poetry and the Comic Mode Louise Joy 8 "We may not know, we cannot tell": Religion and Reserve in Victorian Children's Poetics Kirstie Blair 9 Nursery Rhymes: Poetry, Language, and the Body Debbie Pullinger 10 "That Terrible Bugaboo": The Role of Music in Poetry for Children Michael Heyman 11 Cognitive Poetics and The Aesthetics of Children's Poetry: A Primer of Possibilities Karen Coats 12 Inner Animals: Nature in Ted Hughes's Poems for Children David Whitley ã PART IV TASTE 13 Children, Poetry, and the Eighteenth-Century School Anthology Andrew O'Malley 14 Selection Andrea Immel 15 Anthologies Seth Lerer ã Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472438317 20180205
This collection gives sustained attention to the literary dimensions of children's poetry from the eighteenth century to the present. While reasserting the importance of well-known voices, such as those of Isaac Watts, William Blake, Lewis Carroll, Christina Rossetti, A. A. Milne, and Carol Ann Duffy, the contributors also reflect on the aesthetic significance of landmark works by less frequently celebrated figures such as Richard Johnson, Ann and Jane Taylor, Cecil Frances Alexander and Michael Rosen. Scholarly treatment of children's poetry has tended to focus on its publication history rather than to explore what comprises - and why we delight in - its idiosyncratic pleasures. And yet arguments about how and why poetic language might appeal to the child are embroiled in the history of children's poetry, whether in Isaac Watts emphasising the didactic efficacy of "like sounds, " William Blake and the Taylor sisters revelling in the beauty of semantic ambiguity, or the authors of nonsense verse jettisoning sense to thrill their readers with the sheer music of poetry. Alive to the ways in which recent debates both echo and repudiate those conducted in earlier periods, The Aesthetics of Children's Poetry investigates the stylistic and formal means through which children's poetry, in theory and in practice, negotiates the complicated demands we have made of it through the ages.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472438317 20180205
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

8. Afeto [2018]

Book
32 pages : color illustrations ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
534 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
80 pages ; 23 cm
Green Library
Book
66 pages ; 20 cm
Green Library
Book
306 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Quand Houellebecq commente Huxley ! -- Huxley avant le meilleur des mondes (1894-1932) -- L'héritier -- La vérité de la souffrance -- L'initiation mondaine -- La poésie contre le désespoir -- L'écrivain phare de la jeunesse d'après-guerre -- Le piège social -- Leçons sur la société industrielle -- L'éducation sentimentale -- Fuites et mascarades -- Nihilisme ? Cynisme ? Misanthropie ? -- Pessimisme -- Entre scepticisme et relativisme -- L'amitié avec D. H. Lawrence -- Le mysticisme poétique contre le désespoir -- Le meilleur des mondes, Huxley et Houellebecq -- Le meilleur des Mondes, un cauchemar transhumaniste -- Le meilleur des Mondes et l'utopie eugéniste -- Le meilleur des Mondes et 1984. Le meilleur des Mondes de Huxley et celui d'aujourd'hui -- Le meilleur des Mondes et l'utopie transhumaniste -- Les Particules élémentaires et l'impossibilité du meilleur des Mondes -- Les Particules élémentaires, un rêve transhumaniste -- La Possibilité d'une île, un cauchemar transhumaniste -- Huxley, du meilleur des mondes a île -- La crise. La Paix des Profondeurs. La conversion -- L'expérience mystique -- L'expérience parapsychologique -- L'expérience psychédélique -- Un citoyen du monde -- Ile -- La dernière épreuve -- Huxley, Houellebecq et J. Lusseyran.
"Mal-être personnel et vive critique des comportements humains ont conduit A. Huxley vers une quête éthique et spirituelle incessante. Auteur d'un des livres les plus célèbres, Le meilleur des Mondes, si son nom est aujourd'hui encore connu, le reste de son oeuvre est oublié comme ses essais historiques (Les Diables de Loudun, L'Éminence grise), ses romans (dont Contrepoint, Temps futurs, Jouvence), ses essais politiques (La fin et les moyens ou Science, paix et liberté). Pourtant, ses intuitions quant à l'évolution de la société furent prémonitoires : à propos de la science, des stupéfiants, du cauchemar transhumaniste, etc. Il fut deux fois l'écrivain phare de la jeunesse étudiante : en Grande-Bretagne après la 1re guerre mondiale et trente ans plus tard sur les campus américains. Comme Houellebecq, il avait compris que l'hégémonie de l'économisme et du divertissement présente tous les risques de désarroi des individus face à leur condition de mortels. Il n'est donc pas étonnant de constater des points d'articulation entre les oeuvres de ces deux auteurs : Les Particules élémentaires sont comme une prolongation du Meilleur des Mondes et La Possibilité d'une Île comme un écho à fie écrit peu avant la mort de Huxley. L'un et l'autre ont d'abord en commun un même souci premier du destin humain individuel et collectif auquel Huxley, à la différence de Houellebecq, donna une réponse religieuse."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 78 pages : illustration ; 18 cm.
  • Introduction: darkness on the edge of town First loop: let's break into hell Second Loop: the double act of you Aftershocks and resonances: the evening redness in the North West.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138235298 20180306
`It's all real. All of it. Everything bad is real' - Moe Alistair McDowall's Pomona was first staged in 2014 and won properly startling, and startled, acclaim. Its edgeland setting permits a surrealistic disengagement of linear forms of time, which is both dreamlike and wildly funny; nightmarish and ominously enveloping. The play has as its imaginative springboard a landscape which is both real and surreal. It offers an unforgettable journey into radical uncertainty, alongside unpredictable action that presents and questions the forms by which all too much of British life is lived. Rabey offers us a wild plunge into this modern English urban rabbit hole, a haunting and bewildering high-stakes hunt for meaning and value, set in a gothic noir Manchester, possibly dystopian (or possibly not).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138235298 20180306
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

14. All fools [2018]

Book
xx, 204 pages ; 23 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION Chapman at the Rose, 1598-99 From the Rose to Blackfriars Terence goes to London: the sources of All Fools The primary plot: Terence transmogrified Love and marriage in Terence and Chapman The secondary plot: adultery for fun and profit Ovid and the art of adultery Cuckoldry as a spectator sport Divorce English style 'Tis at the Half Moon Tavern' In praise of the horn The text ALL FOOLS APPENDIX The Walsingham Sonnet INDEX -- .
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780719089251 20180514
Of all the poets Francis Meres names in his famous Palladis Tamia, Wits Treasury (1598), just two rate a mention as being both 'our best for tragedy' and 'the best poets for comedy': William Shakespeare and George Chapman. All Fools, written in 1599, is the only Elizabethan comedy based directly on the plays of Terence. By taking episodes and characters from two brilliant works, The Self-Tormenter and The Brothers, Chapman creates something that is distinctly Elizabethan while remaining faithful to the spirit of the great Roman master. In this edition, an extensive introduction and commentary show how Chapman combines the literary and theatrical traditions of ancient Rome with everyday life in his own time to fashion a sparkling and innovative comedy that will delight audiences today as much as it did those of 1599. -- .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780719089251 20180514
Green Library
Book
lv, 212 pages : illustrations (black and white), maps ; 22 cm.
Green Library

16. Anatomic [2018]

Book
150 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm
Green Library
Book
392 pages ; 24 cm
"An astonishingly incisive and suspenseful novel about a scandal amongst Britain's privileged elite and the women caught up in its wake. Sophie's husband James is a loving father, a handsome man, a charismatic and successful public figure. And yet he stands accused of a terrible crime. Sophie is convinced he is innocent and desperate to protect her precious family from the lies that threaten to rip them apart. Kate is the lawyer hired to prosecute the case: an experienced professional who knows that the law is all about winning the argument. And yet Kate seeks the truth at all times. She is certain James is guilty and is determined he will pay for his crimes. Who is right about James? Sophie or Kate? And is either of them informed by anything more than instinct and personal experience? Despite her privileged upbringing, Sophie is well aware that her beautiful life is not inviolable. She has known it since she and James were first lovers, at Oxford, and she witnessed how easily pleasure could tip into tragedy. Most people would prefer not to try to understand what passes between a man and a woman when they are alone: alone in bed, alone in an embrace, alone in an elevator ... Or alone in the moonlit courtyard of an Oxford college, where a girl once stood before a boy, heart pounding with excitement, then fear. Sophie never understood why her tutorial partner Holly left Oxford so abruptly. What would she think, if she knew the truth?"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
66 pages ; 23 cm
In her first collection of new poetry since 2011's acclaimed Family Values, Wendy Cope celebrates 'the half-forgotten stories of our lives' with compassion, wisdom and wit. Cope continues to be the most generous of authors, sharing her experience of childhood and marriage and writing poignantly about the passing of time. In several of the poems she reimagines Shakespeare in unorthodox fashion; in others she offers heartfelt tributes to friends and to public figures including Eric Morecambe and John Cage. Anecdotal Evidence demonstrates the formal brilliance and empathetic insight which have delighted readers for years, and shows why Wendy Cope is one of our best-loved poets.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780571338610 20180423
Wendy Cope's first collection of new poetry since 2011's acclaimed Family Values, chosen as one of the Telegraph's 15 Best Poetry Books of All Time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780571338603 20180423
Green Library
Book
vii, 297 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • CONTENTS List of Figures Introduction Monika M. Elbert and Susanne Schmid PART I: Nationalism and Imperialism: The Hotel as Guidepost to National Interests 1 The Moral Economy of the Irish Hotel from the Union to the Famine Melissa Fegan 2 English Inns and Hotels in Nineteenth-Century Fiction Susanne Schmid 3 American Accommodation: Transatlantic Travel, Boardinghouse Settlers, and Hotel Culture Tamara S. Wagner Part II: The Mundane vs the Supernatural: Domesticity, Danger, or Mystery in Hotels 4 Hawthorne and Hotels in Great Britain Frederick Newberry 5 A Tomb with a View: Supernatural Experiences in the Late Nineteenth Century's Egyptian Hotels Eleanor Dobson 6 Dark Hostelries: Gothic Hotels and Inns in the Long Nineteenth Century Laurence Davies PART III: From Comfort to Capitalist Excess: The Evolving Hotel Experience as Status Symbol 7 The Waldorf-Astoria and New York Society: Grand Hotel as Site of Modernity Annabella Fick 8 Henry James and "the testimony of the hotel" to Transatlantic Encounters Maureen E. Montgomery 9 Gilded-Age Hotel Culture and the Construction of American Leisure-Class Identity Grace Tirapelle PART IV: Assignations, Trysts, and Memorable Encounters in Hotels 10 The Inns of Romantic Drama Frederick Burwick 11 George Eliot and George Henry Lewes: Respectable Adultery and Anonymous Celebrity Kathleen McCormack 12 Edith Wharton's American and French Hotels: A Permeable Private/Public Space Carole M. Shaffer-Koros PART V: Women's Travels and the Hotel as Nexus between Private and Public Realms 13 "A Continual Recurrence of Bad Inns": Public Domesticity and Women's Travel in the Early Nineteenth Century Pam Perkins 14 "I was in a fidget to know where we could possibly sleep": Antebellum Hospitality on the Margins of Nation in Caroline Kirkland's A New Home, Who'll Follow? and Eliza Farnham's Life in Prairie Land Michelle Gaffner Wood 15 Afterword Kevin J. James List of Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138675902 20171023
This volume examines the hotel experience of Anglo-American travelers in the nineteenth century from the viewpoint of literary and cultural studies as well as spatiality theory. Focusing on the social and imaginary space of the hotel in fiction, periodicals, diaries, and travel accounts, the essays shed new light on nineteenth-century notions of travel writing. Analyzing the liminal space of the hotel affords a new way of understanding the freedoms and restrictions felt by travelers from different social classes and nations. As an environment that forced travelers to reimagine themselves or their cultural backgrounds, the hotel could provide exhilarating moments of self-discovery or dangerous feelings of alienation. It could prove liberating to the tourist seeking an escape from prescribed gender roles or social class constructs. The book addresses changing notions of nationality, social class, and gender in a variety of expansive or oppressive hotel milieu: in the private space of the hotel room and in the public spaces (foyers, parlors, dining areas). Sections address topics including nationalism and imperialism; the mundane vs. the supernatural; comfort and capitalist excess; assignations, trysts, and memorable encounters in hotels; and women's travels. The book also offers a brief history of inns and hotels of the time period, emphasizing how hotels play a large role in literary texts, where they frequently reflect order and disorder in a personal and/or national context. This collection will appeal to scholars in literature, travel writing, history, cultural studies, and transnational studies, and to those with interest in travel and tourism, hospitality, and domesticity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138675902 20171023
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 227 pages : illustrations, map ; 21 cm
  • Introduction Chapter 1:`Goblin's market: Israel Gollancz, the 1916 Tercentenary, and the invention of "global Shakespeare"' reflections I Chapter 2: `The Shakespeare Hut: Anzac meets Shakespeare in London, 1916' reflections II Chapter 3:`Oblivion and Memory: New Zealand Inside the Shakespeare Hut (and Beyond), 1916' reflections III Chapter 4: `The Afterlife of a Memorial' reflections IV Chapter 5: `"Remembering with Advantages": Henry V and the play of commemorative rhetoric in Australia' After Word: `Memory, Architecture, Space' Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474271448 20180319
Despite a recent surge of critical interest in the Shakespeare Tercentenary, a great deal has been forgotten about this key moment in the history of the place of Shakespeare in national and global culture - much more than has been remembered. This book offers new archival discoveries about, and new interpretations of, the Tercentenary celebrations in Britain, Australia and New Zealand and reflects on the long legacy of those celebrations. This collection gathers together five scholars from Britain, Australia and New Zealand to reflect on the modes of commemoration of Shakespeare across the hemispheres in and after the Tercentenary year, 1916. It was at this moment of remembering in 1916 that `global Shakespeare' first emerged in recognizable form. Each contributor performs their own `antipodal' reading, assessing in parallel events across two hemispheres, geographically opposite but politically and culturally connected in the wake of empire.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474271448 20180319
SAL3 (off-campus storage)