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Book
242 pages ; 21 cm.
"A high-tension, sexy, political thriller in which freelance CIA agent Malko Linge brings a project to his bosses that could blow open a ring of Russian spies operating in the United States. At a benefit dinner, Austrian playboy and CIA freelancer Malko Linge meets an intriguing woman, Zhanna Khrenkov, who has an unusual proposal. She will disclose everything she knows about her husband Alexei's business if Malko will get rid of Alexei's younger, British mistress. Appalled, Malko refuses--until Zhanna reveals her husband's real job: head of a ring of Russian spies operating undercover inside the U.S. For Malko's CIA contacts, this is a highly necessary job; for Malko, it is a highly sensitive one. He will move cautiously from Vienna to London to Moscow, trying to find the right balance of winning Zhanna's trust without compromising his moral integrity"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (218 pages)
From an Existential Vacuum to a Tragic Optimism: The Search for Meaning and the Presence of God in Modern Literature employs a new theoretical approach to critical analysis: Victor Frankl's logotherapy (from the Greek "logos" for word or reason and often related to divine wisdom), a unique form of existentialism. On the basis of his observations of the power of human endurance and transcendence - the discovery of meaning even in the midst of harrowing circumstances - Frankl diagnoses the malaise of the current age as an "existential vacuum, " a sense of meaninglessness. He suggests that a panacea for this malaise may be found in creativity, love, and moral choice - even when faced with suffering or death. He affirms that human beings may transcend this vacuum, discover meaning - or even ultimate meaning to be found in Ultimate Being, or God - and live with a sense of "tragic optimism." This book observes both the current age's "existential vacuum" - a malaise of emptiness and meaninglessness - and its longing for meaning and God as reflected in three genres: poetry, novel, and fantasy. Part I, "Reflections of God in the Poetic Vision, " addresses "tragic optimism" - hope when there seems to be no reason for hope - in poems by William Butler Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Gerard Manley Hopkins. Part II, "American Angst: Emptiness and Possibility in John Steinbeck's Major Novels, " presents a study of Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, East of Eden, and The Winter of Our Discontent - novels that together form a uniquely American epic trilogy. Together these novels tell the story of a nation's avarice, corruption, and betrayal offset by magnanimity, heroism, and hospitality. Set against the backdrop of Frankl's ways of finding meaning and fulfillment - all obliquely implying the felt presence of God - the characters are representative Every Americans, in whose lives are reflected a nation's worst vices and best hopes. Part III, "A Tragic Optimism: The Triumph of Good in the Fantasy Worlds of Tolkien, Lewis, and Rowling, " defines fantasy and science fiction as mirrors with which to view reality. J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, C. S. Lewis's That Hideous Strength, and J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series are considered in the light of Frankl's logotherapy - providing paths to meaning and the ultimate meaning to be found in God. In a postmodern, fragmented age, these works affirm a continuing vision of God (often through His felt absence) and, also, a most human yearning for meaning even when there seems to be none - providing, as Frankl maintains, "a tragic optimism.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781443852418 20170502
Book
x, 210 p. ; 25 cm.
Eustace the Monk and Fouke Fitz Waryn belong in the great tradition of medieval outlaws, and aspects of their lives - part fact, part fiction - find a reflection in the life of that most famous of all outlaws, Robin Hood. This is a translation of the two medieval-French romances of the 13th century which relate their deeds: "Li Romans de Witasse le Moine" and "Fouke le Fitz Waryn". Both were born around 1170; both broke with their overlords (the Count of Boulogne and King John) at about the same time; and both spent a period as outlaws, during which they toyed with their lords and exacted revenge for the injustice they suffered. Eustace - not only an outlaw and a sea captain, but a pirate and magician - was one of the most feared men of his day. Fouke's life was dominated by his attempt to take possession of Whittington Castle in Shropshire, to which his family laid claim. Alongside the historical discussion of the lives of the protagonists of the two romances, Glyn Burgess reveals the multiple layers of the romances themselves: historically verifiable facts, information which cannot be proved but rings true, and a wide range of material which is manifestly imaginary, containing stock motifs also found in other romances of the period.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780859914383 20160527
Green Library

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