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Book
xiv, 423 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements
  • Prologue
  • Introduction : Sociolinguistic diversification
  • Diversification
  • Diversification : social stratification
  • Diversification : Stratification and popularization
  • Language traditions
  • Literary and popular language
  • Language reforms and standardization
  • Afterthe Warsof Independence
  • Schoolsofthought
  • The case of Spanish : from the beginning to New World Spanish
  • New World Spanish : spoken and written
  • The aim of this book
  • Thechapters
  • Explicative models
  • The origins of Spanish : Spain and the New World
  • The origins
  • The riseof Castilian
  • Repopulation of Andalusia
  • Toledano and Old Castilian
  • De-affrication, devoicing and inter-dentalization
  • De-patatalization
  • Yeísmo or de-latelarization
  • Aspiration and omission of/s/ in implosive position
  • Additional changes
  • Spanish initial F- : pastand přsent perspectives
  • Featuresof Judaeo-Spanish
  • Features from Spain transplanted to New Spain
  • The features of Andalusian Spanish
  • Spanish speakers in New Spain
  • Spanish speakers and the castes in the 16th century
  • Theories on the origins of New World Spanish
  • Koines and koineization in New World Spanish
  • The use of dialect features in New Spain
  • Conclusions
  • The first speakers of Mexican Spanish
  • The first Spanish speakers in Mesoamerica and social stratification
  • The Spanish Caribbean experiment
  • The encomienda in New Spain
  • The new System of social stratification
  • Origins of the first Spanish speakers
  • The new laws of 1542
  • Spanish speakers in the 16th century : numbers and regions
  • The new environment
  • The process of socialization and diffusion
  • Thecenter
  • The Inquisition
  • Mattersof routine in and around the Holy Office
  • Spanish and the Holy Office
  • The sins recorded by the Holy Office
  • Spanish speakers and ethnie groups in the Abecedario
  • Spanish speakers of African descent
  • Afro-Mexicans and the process of acculturation
  • Afro-Mexican enclaves
  • Conclusions
  • The Spanish language and its variations in New Spain
  • The earliest Spanish documents written in Mexico
  • The First Letter by Hernán Cortés
  • The Second Letter by Hernán Cortés
  • Salient features in Hernán Cortés' Cartas de Relación
  • Adaptation of Amerindian languages
  • Morphology and syntax
  • Common verbs in transition
  • Verbal clitics
  • Stylistic and dialect variations
  • Indicative and subjunctive
  • Imperfect subjunctive in adverbial clauses
  • Imperfect subjunctive in translation
  • Conditional sentences with -SE in translation
  • Conditional sentences with -RA in translation
  • Extinct and current lexical items and discourse markers
  • Use of Taino borrowings
  • Documentation of Taino borrowings in New Spain
  • Pronounsof address
  • General features of 16th Century Spanish pronunciation
  • General features of 16th Century Spanish : morpho-syntax
  • Conclusions
  • Koineization and the first generation of Spanish speakers
  • The first generation
  • Spanish space and Spanish institutions
  • The formation of the Mexican Spanish koine
  • The Spanish spoken and written in the 16th Century
  • Evidence of dialect contact and dialect change
  • Other documents related to Hernán Cortés
  • The features of Cortesian texts
  • Spellings of common verbs
  • Morpho-syntactic features of Cortesian texts
  • Position of verbal clitics
  • Pro-etymological and anti-etymologicat verbal clitics
  • Variable use of PARA and PA
  • The useof imperfect subjunctive
  • Pronounsof address : from Cortés' letters to 1555
  • Diffusion of Spanish, discourse markers, and lexical items
  • Loansfrom Taino and Nahuatl
  • The speech of Diego de Ordaz
  • Morpho-syntactic features of Diego de Ordaz
  • The origins of voseo
  • Nahuatl loans in the Vocabulario de la lengua castellana y mexicana
  • The explicative model of proto-Mexican Spanish
  • The Gulfof Mexico
  • The sibilants in the Gulf
  • Leísmo in the Gulf
  • Use of subject pronouns : vos, vosotros, vuestra merced
  • Imperfect subjunctive : variations in -SE and -RA
  • Lexicon
  • Conclusions
  • How Spanish diversified
  • Occupationalactivitiesand social networks
  • Mining and metallurgy
  • Mining centers and ethnie groups
  • Taxco
  • Pachuca
  • Sultepec
  • Puebla
  • Queretaro
  • San Luis Potosi
  • Guanajuato
  • Zacatecas
  • Forms of labor and language contact
  • Losingthetiestothe land
  • Labor and agriculture : indigenous vs. Spanish crops
  • The obrajes
  • Formal ̌ducation
  • Education for women
  • Additional activities promoting the use of Spanish
  • Spanish literature in Spain and in New Spain
  • Conclusions
  • Continuity and change : The second generation
  • The innovations of the second generation
  • Linguistic documents : the Central Highlands
  • Pronunciation traits
  • Other pronunciation features
  • Morpho-syntactic features
  • Imperfect subjunctive
  • Pronouns of address
  • Original letters by Alonso Ortiz
  • Mixing tú, vos and vuestra merced
  • Suárez de Peralta's Tratado del descubrimiento de las Yndias y su conquista
  • Relevant features in Sùrez de Peralta's Tratado
  • Object pronouns LES and LOS in the second-generation
  • Other object pronouns
  • Verb forms
  • Pronoun of address in the Tratado
  • Vuesa(s) merced(es)
  • Use of imperfect subjunctive
  • Conditional sentences ending with -RA
  • Discourse markers, idiomatic expressions and other features
  • References toethnicity
  • Linguistic documents : the Gulf
  • Miscellaneous traits in the Gulf
  • The system of pronouns of address : tú, vos, vosotros, vuestra merced, su merced
  • Ctitic pronouns as direct objects
  • Imperfect subjunctive : variations of -SE and -RA
  • Lexical items referring to ethnicity
  • More examptes from the second generation
  • Conclusions
  • Religion, bilingualism and acculturation
  • Religion as a driving force
  • Population losses and language shift
  • Factors contributing to maintenance : new politicai Organization
  • New religion and language maintenance and shift
  • Rescuing the past for the future
  • The second generation and the good memories about Tlatelolco
  • Strategies of Hispanizaron
  • Religion and the indigenous masses
  • Hispanicization of the indigenous
  • Transculturation and miscegenation
  • Language contact, bilingualism, and socio-ethnie groups
  • Bilingual individuais and bilingual groups
  • Ethnicity and socio-ethnie labels
  • Hispanization of the Afro-Mexican population
  • Conclusions
  • Diversification and stability : 17th century
  • Spanish speakers in the 17th century
  • Education of Spanish speakers
  • Uprooting and integration of the castes
  • Colonial Spanish in the oldest Spanish-speaking regions
  • The spellingof the sibilants in Castilian
  • The spelling of the sibilants in the Central Highlands
  • Sibilants in the Gulf
  • "Regular" seseo
  • Residual verb forms
  • Leísmo in the Central Highlands and in the Gulf
  • Inanimate objects and leísmo
  • Pronouns of address : tú, vuestra merced, su merced, Usted
  • Vuestra merced. Usted and vosotros
  • Change of pronouns in the personal domain
  • Imperfect subjunctive with -SE and -RA
  • Ethnie groups
  • Literature in Spanish
  • Conclusion
  • The end of the colonial period : 18th century
  • Attrition of peninsular Spanish variants
  • The growth and decline of the colony
  • Spanish emigrantsto NewSpain
  • Population of NewSpain
  • The revillagigedo census
  • The growth of the cities
  • Education
  • The Bourbon reforms, the economy and ethnicity
  • Language attrition in the Central Highlands and in the Gulf
  • Attrition of morpho-syntactic variants
  • Direct object pronouns LE and LO
  • Pronouns of address
  • Use of -SE and -RA in conditional clauses and imperfect subjunctive
  • The use of -SE and -RA in officiai documentation
  • Lexicon
  • Language reforms, journalism and literature
  • Spanish-accented Nahuatl
  • Conclusions
  • Diversification, attrition and residual variants
  • Attrition-focused variants
  • Optimal residual variants
  • The prepositions PARA and PA
  • Dissolution of hiatus
  • Addition of-s in the přťrit
  • Duplicate possessives
  • Amerindian loans
  • Residual variants belonging to the vernacular realm
  • The diphthong /we/ in various positions
  • Verb forms
  • The endings -RA and -RA in protasisand apodosis
  • Lexical items and idiomatic expressions in popular speech
  • The common denominator : residual variants
  • Infrequent variants in modem Mexican Spanish
  • Variants discarded in Mexican Spanish
  • Modem Usted
  • Conclusions
  • Conclusions
  • A tridimensional study
  • The role of history : direct external factors
  • Creole and semi-creole varieties
  • From the past to the present : indirect external factors
  • Peninsular, New World and Latin American Spanish
  • Stages of diversification
  • PARA and PA in Venezuela
  • Diversification of the New World Spanish tree
  • Final conclusions
  • Appendix
  • References
  • Index.
This book covers the analysis of Spanish written from the early 16th to the early 19th century, immediately before the Independent period in most Spanish-speaking colonies. It is based on manuscripts such as the Segunda Carta de Relacion (1522) by Hernan Cortes, a rare inquisitorial manuscript known as El Abecedario, old printed books, and published collections of linguistic documents.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781501512629 20170220
Green Library

2. The French review [1927 - ]

Journal/Periodical
v. port. 24 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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