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Book
vi, 480 pages ; 22 cm.
The Libation Bearers (Choephori) of Aeschylus is the central tragedy of his Oresteia, the only Greek trilogy that survives in full and one of the acknowledged masterpieces of Greek literature. The play enacts and explores in profound detail the unsettling myth of Orestes, the young hero who was obliged to avenge the murder of his father Agamemnon by killing his mother Clytemnestra. The standard commentary, by A. F. Garvie, is intended for advanced students and professional scholars and makes few concessions to the less experienced. This edition, while taking full account of the latest advances in scholarship and criticism, seeks to make the play accessible to a much wider range of readers. Besides an introduction and bibliography it includes a newly constituted Greek text (with critical apparatus), a facing translation closely matched to this, and a commentary keyed to the translation. The commentary seeks to interpret the play at all levels, not avoiding detailed issues of textual criticism and the meaning of individual words but also exploring the play's imagery, questions of stagecraft and dramatic effect, the poet's use of existing mythical and poetic material, and the wider significance of the play in relation to the rest of the trilogy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786940995 20180416
Green Library

2. Akzente Pindars [2018]

Book
172 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
225 pages ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 216 pages ; 18 cm.
Antigone Undone offers an urgent and mesmerizing account of the creative and destructive power of great art. In 2015 Will Aitken journeyed to Luxembourg for the rehearsals and premiere of Anne Carson's translation of Sophokles' 5th-century BCE tragedy Antigone , starring Juliette Binoche and directed by theatrical sensation Ivo van Hove. In watching the play, he became awestruck with the plight of the young woman at the centre of the action. "Look at what these men are doing to me, " An-tigone cries, expressing the predicament of the dispossessed throughout time. Transfixed by the strange and uncanny power of the play, he finds himself haunted by its protagonist, finally resulting in a suicidal breakdown. With a backstage view of the action, Aitken illuminates the creative process of Carson, Binoche, and Van Hove and offers a rare glimpse into collaborative genius in action. He also investi-gates the response to the play by Hegel, Virginia Woolf, Judith Butler, and others, who too, were moved by its timeless protest against injustice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780889775213 20180416
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 282 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction-- 1. How to read the Noctes Atticae-- 2. Gellius in the history of writing about reading-- 3. Gellius on Pliny: fashioning the miscellanist and his readerly lifestyle-- 4. Encounters with tradition in Gellian research-- 5. Favorinus, fiction, and dialogue at the limits of expertise-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781316510124 20180604
Long a source for quotations, fragments, and factoids, the Noctes Atticae of Aulus Gellius offers hundreds of brief but vivid glimpses of Roman intellectual life. In this book Joseph Howley demonstrates how the work may be read as a literary text in its own right, and discusses the rich evidence it provides for the ancient history of reading, thought, and intellectual culture. He argues that Gellius is in close conversation with predecessors both Greek and Latin, such as Plutarch and Pliny the Elder, and also offers new ways of making sense of the text's 'miscellaneous' qualities, like its disorder and its table of contents. Dealing with topics ranging from the framing of literary quotations to the treatment of contemporary celebrities who appear in its pages, this book offers a new way to learn from the Noctes about the world of Roman reading and thought.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781316510124 20180604
Green Library
Book
xii, 198 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction a. Preface b. Date and Authorship 1 c. Manuscript Tradition d. Our Poem e. The Tradition of Fable f. Epic Parody g. Parodic Epic h. Homeric Language and Meter i. Date and Authorship 2 j. A Note on Translation k. Works Cited Greek Text English Translation Commentary Vocabulary.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781350035942 20180416
This book offers students of Greek and scholars interested in Greek literature the first English-language commentary on the "Battle of Frogs and Mice", a short animal epic ascribed to Homer in the ancient world. The book includes a contextualizing introduction covering issues of literary genre, literary history and the language of Homeric Greek. In addition to a revised Greek text, the volume also offers a new translation of the poem. The commentary furnishes readers with extensive linguistic and literary information so that they may investigate the problem of the poem's character and authorship on their own. A full vocabulary at the back ensures this is a one-stop shop for students reading the poem.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781350035942 20180416
Green Library
Book
xii, 397 pages ; 25 cm.
The epics of ancient Greece and Rome are unique in that many went unfinished, or if they were finished, remained open to further narration that was beyond the power, interest, or sometimes the life-span of the poet. Such incompleteness inaugurated a tradition of continuance and closure in their reception. Brill's Companion to Prequels, Sequels, and Retellings of Classical Epic explores this long tradition of continuing epics through sequels, prequels, retellings and spin-offs. This collection of essays brings together several noted scholars working in a variety of fields to trace the persistence of this literary effort from their earliest instantiations in the Iliad and Odyssey of Homer to the contemporary novels of Ursula K. Le Guin and Margaret Atwood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004249356 20180611
Green Library
Book
xix, 634 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Acknowledgements List of Figures List of Abbreviations Author Biographies Introduction: The Reception of Aeschylus â Rebecca Futo Kennedy Part 1: Pre-Modern Receptions 1 The Reception of Aeschylus in Sicily â David G. Smith 2 The Comedians' Aeschylus â David Rosenbloom 3 Aristotle's Reception of Aeschylus: Reserved Without Malice â Dana Lacourse Munteanu 4 Aeschylus in the Hellenistic Period â Sebastiana Nervegna 5 Aeschylus in the Roman Empire â George W. M. Harrison 6 Aeschylus in Byzantium â Christos Simelidis Part 2: Modern Receptions 7 Aeschylus and Opera â Michael Ewans 8 Aeschylus in Germany â Theodore Ziolkowski 9 Inglorious Barbarians: Court Intrigue and Military Disaster Strike Xerxes, "The Sick Man of Europe" â Gonda Van Steen 10 Transtextual Transformations of Prometheus Bound in Percy Bysshe Shelley's Prometheus Unbound: Prometheus' Gifts to Humankind â Fabien Desset 11 Aeschylus and Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus, by Mary Shelley â Ana Gonzalez-Rivas Fernandez 12 An Aeschylean Waterloo: Responding to War from the Oresteia to Vanity Fair â Barbara Witucki 13 Form and Money in Wagner's Ring and Aeschylean Tragedy â Richard Seaford 14 Eumenides and Newmenides: Academic Furies in Edwardian Cambridge â Patrick J. Murphy and Fredrick Porcheddu 15 The Broadhead Hypothesis: Did Aeschylus Perform Word Repetition in Persians? â Stratos E. Constantinidis 16 Persians On French Television: An Opera-Oratorio Echoing the Algerian War â Gabriel Sevilla 17 Aeschylus' Oresteia on British Television â Amanda Wrigley 18 Orestes On Trial in Africa: Pasolini's Appunti Per un'Orestiade Africana and Sissako's Bamako â Tom Hawkins 19 Reception of the Plays of Aeschylus in Africa â Kevin J. Wetmore, Jr. 20 In Search of Prometheus: Aeschylean Wanderings in Latin America â Jacques A. Bromberg 21 Avatars of Aeschylus: O'Neill to Herzog/Golder â Marianne McDonald 22 The Overlooked οἰκονομία of Aeschylus' Agamemnon and Stanley Kubrick's The Shining â Geoffrey Bakewell 23 "Now Harkonnen Shall Kill Harkonnen": Aeschylus, Dynastic Violence, and Twofold Tragedies in Frank Herbert's Dune â Brett M. Rogers 24 "Save Our City": The Curious Absence of Aeschylus in Modern Political Thought â Arlene W. Saxonhouse 25 Political Theory in Aeschylean Drama: Ancient Themes and their Contemporary Reception â Larissa Atkison and Ryan K. Balot Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004249325 20171218
Brill's Companion to the Reception of Aeschylus explores the various ways Aeschylus' tragedies have been discussed, parodied, translated, revisioned, adapted, and integrated into other works over the course of the last 2500 years. Immensely popular while alive, Aeschylus' reception begins in his own lifetime. And, while he has not been the most reproduced of the three Attic tragedians on the stage since then, his receptions have transcended genre and crossed to nearly every continent. While still engaging with Aeschylus' theatrical reception, the volume also explores Aeschylus off the stage--in radio, the classroom, television, political theory, philosophy, science fiction and beyond.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004249325 20171218
Green Library
Book
xv, 240 pages ; 22 cm.
  • .- 1 Byzantine Studies in an Age of Environmental Crisis.- 2 Zoomorphic and Anthomorphic Metaphors in the "Proto-Romance" Digenis Akritis.- 3 Rape, Consent, and Ecofeminist Narratology in the Komnenian Romances.- 4 Witches and Nature Control in the Palaiologan Romances and Beyond.- 5 Byzantine Posthumanism: Autpoiesis, Sympoiesis, and an Eco-Ethics of Sustainability.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319692029 20180129
Byzantine Ecocriticism: Women, Nature, and Power in the Medieval Greek Romance applies literary ecocriticism to the imaginative fiction of the Greek world from the twelfth to fifteenth centuries. Through analyses of hunting, gardening, bride-stealing, and warfare, Byzantine Ecocriticism exposes the attitudes and behaviors that justified human control over women, nature, and animals; the means by which such control was exerted; and the anxieties surrounding its limits. Adam Goldwyn thus demonstrates the ways in which intersectional ecocriticism, feminism, and posthumanism can be applied to medieval texts, and illustrates how the legacies of medieval and Byzantine environmental practice and ideology continue to be relevant to contemporary ecological and environmental concerns.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319692029 20180129
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 396 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction. Caesarian questions: then, now, hence / L. Grillo and C. Krebs
  • Literature and politics. Caesar, literature and politics at the end of the Republic / K. Raaflaub
  • The Commentarii in their propagandistic context / C. Krebs
  • Caesar constructing Caesar / W. Batstone
  • Priesthoods, gods and stars / J. Rüpke
  • The politics of geography / A. Riggsby
  • Nostri and "the other(s)" / A. Johnston
  • Genre, rhetoric, language and style. Genres and generic contaminations in the Commentarii / D. Nousek
  • Caesar's style / C. Krebs
  • Speeches in the Commentarii / L. Grillo
  • Wit and irony / A. Corbeill
  • Literary approaches to Caesar / L. Grillo
  • Fragmentary works. Caesar the linguist: the debate about the Latin language / G. Pezzini
  • Caesar's orations / H. van der Blom
  • Caesar's poetry in its context / Sergio Casali
  • Anticato / A. Corbeill
  • The letters of Caesar / R. Morello
  • Sources and Nachleben. Caesar and Greek historians / L. Pitcher
  • Caesar and Roman historiography prior to the Commentarii / M. Chassignet
  • The Corpus Caesarianum / J. F. Gaertner
  • Caesar in Livy and Tacitus / C. S. Kraus
  • Caesar, Virgil and Lucan / T. Joseph
  • Narrating the Gallic and Civil Wars with and beyond Caesar / J. Thorne
  • Writing war with Caesar: the Commentarii's afterlife in military memoirs / H. Schadee.
Well-known as a brilliant general and politician, Julius Caesar also played a fundamental role in the formation of the Latin literary language and remains a central figure in the history of Latin literature. With twenty-three chapters written by renowned scholars, this Companion provides an accessible introduction to Caesar as an intellectual along with a scholarly assessment of his multiple literary accomplishments and new insights into their literary value. The Commentarii and Caesar's lost works are presented in their historical and literary context. The various chapters explore their main features, the connection between literature, state religion and politics, Caesar's debt to previous Greek and Latin authors, and his legacy within and outside of Latin literature. The innovative volume will be of great value to all students and scholars of Latin literature and to those seeking a more rounded portrait of the achievements of Julius Caesar.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107670495 20180226
Green Library

11. Carmina Burana [2018]

Book
2 volumes (xxix, 567; 794 pages) ; 21 cm.
  • volume I. Introduction ; Original collection, 1-102 ; Notes
  • volume II. Original collection, 103-228 ; Additional pieces, 1-26 ; Notes.
"Carmina Burana, literally 'Songs from Beuern,' is named after the village where the manuscript was found. The songbook consists of nearly 250 poems, on subjects ranging from sex and gambling to crusades and corruption. Compiled in the thirteenth century in South Tyrol, a German-speaking region of Italy, it is the largest surviving collection of secular Medieval Latin verse and provides insights into the vibrant social, spiritual, and intellectual life of the Middle Ages. The multilingual codex includes works by leading Latin poets such as the Archpoet, Walter of Châtillon, and the canonist Peter of Blois, as well as stanzas by German lyric poets. More than half these poems are preserved nowhere else. A selection from Carmina Burana first appeared in Victorian England in 1884 under the provocative title Wine, Women and Song. The title Carmina Burana remains fixed in the popular imagination today, conjured vividly by Carl Orff's famous cantata -- no Medieval Latin lyrics are better known throughout the world. This new presentation of the medieval classic in its entirety makes the anthology accessible in two volumes to Latin lovers and English readers alike."-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
liv, 480 pages ; 24 cm
  • Scholarship
  • Historical background
  • The corpus of the Agrarian speeches
  • Text and translation
  • Commentary.
The Agrarian Speeches (Orationes de lege agraria) were delivered in January 63 BCE, just after Cicero had entered office as consul; they are his inaugural orations and therefore the first element of his consular activity. They not only provide valuable testimony for approaches to agrarian legislation in the late Republic, but also show how the new consul presented himself before the Senate and the People at the beginning of his consular year, a significant political event for which very few extensive sources remain. These speeches are also significant in demonstrating Cicero's rhetorical virtuosity and the sophistication of his political tactics in arguing against a proposal for a grand scheme of buying, selling, and allocating land put forward by the Tribune of the People, P. Servilius Rullus. Delivered in the same year as his arguably more famous orations against Catiline, they have nevertheless found less attention in modern scholarship. This edition offers a comprehensive introduction, a revised Latin text alongside a new English translation, and the first detailed commentary on the corpus, which, besides addressing numerous linguistic and textual issues, also explains the complex legal and historical situation and illustrates Cicero's sophisticated argumentative techniques. Drawing on the contemporary resurgence of academic interest in political oratory, it aims to bring these neglected speeches to a wider audience and will be particularly suitable for both scholars and students interested in Cicero, oratory, Roman law, or the history of the Roman Republic.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198715405 20180416
Law Library (Crown)
Book
liv, 480 pages ; 24 cm
  • INTRODUCTION-- TEXT AND TRANSLATION-- COMMENTARY-- ENDMATTER.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198715405 20180416
The Agrarian Speeches (Orationes de lege agraria) were delivered in January 63 BCE, just after Cicero had entered office as consul; they are his inaugural orations and therefore the first element of his consular activity. They not only provide valuable testimony for approaches to agrarian legislation in the late Republic, but also show how the new consul presented himself before the Senate and the People at the beginning of his consular year, a significant political event for which very few extensive sources remain. These speeches are also significant in demonstrating Cicero's rhetorical virtuosity and the sophistication of his political tactics in arguing against a proposal for a grand scheme of buying, selling, and allocating land put forward by the Tribune of the People, P. Servilius Rullus. Delivered in the same year as his arguably more famous orations against Catiline, they have nevertheless found less attention in modern scholarship. This edition offers a comprehensive introduction, a revised Latin text alongside a new English translation, and the first detailed commentary on the corpus, which, besides addressing numerous linguistic and textual issues, also explains the complex legal and historical situation and illustrates Cicero's sophisticated argumentative techniques. Drawing on the contemporary resurgence of academic interest in political oratory, it aims to bring these neglected speeches to a wider audience and will be particularly suitable for both scholars and students interested in Cicero, oratory, Roman law, or the history of the Roman Republic.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198715405 20180416
Green Library
Book
261 pages ; 23 cm.
"Diese Arbeit hat es sich zum Ziel gesetzt, für die nach mehr als einem Jahrhundert intensiver philologischer Debatte immer noch ungeklärte "Cirisfrage" eine plausible Lösung anzubieten. Nach so langer Zeit kann als (fast) allgemein akzeptiert nämlich lediglich gelten, dass das schon in der Suetonvita Vergil zugeschriebene neoterische Epyllion über die leidenschaftliche, letztlich verhängnisvolle Liebe der Scylla zum Landesfeind Minos nicht von diesem Dichter stammt. Die bislang für das Werk vorgeschlagenen Datierungen reichen von der Mitte des ersten vorchristlichen bis ins dritte nachchristliche Jahrhundert, ein Befund, der eine neuerliche, gründliche Behandlung dieses Problems herausfordert. Die alleinige Grundlage chronologischer Aussagen können auch in dieser Arbeit nur die zahlreichen Textparallelen zwischen der Ciris und einer großen Zahl anderer Autoren bilden. Im Vergleich mit den vorliegenden Cirisstudien werden hier aber zusätzlich bislang unbeachtete Cirisparallelen bei Vergil und Ovid sowie auch Vergleichsstellen bei Horaz, Tibull und Properz, in Catalepton 9 und im Panegyricus Messalae zeitlich ausgewertet. Prioritätsentscheidungen werden nicht nur nach den traditionellen Kriterien getroffen, sondern auch und vor allem anhand einer Reihe vorwiegend formaler Phänomene, die der Verfasser bei der jahrelangen Analyse von Similienpaaren mit von Haus aus sicherer Dependenz als auffallend häufige Erscheinungen just an Sekundärstellen ermittelt und in der Folge auch schon zur Klärung fraglicher Prioritätslagen herangezogen hat. Die Erweiterung des untersuchten Referenzmaterials und dessen Bewertung auch mithilfe dieser neuen, objektiven Kriterien sollte dem erzielten Ergebnis hinlängliche Sicherheit verleihen: Die Ciris ist zweifellos ein Produkt der augusteischen Epoche, dessen Autor niemand Geringerer als Asinius Pollio sein dürfte."-- Publisher's website.
"This study aims at solving a problem that has been puzzling generations of philologists up to the present day. After nearly a century of emotional debate one of its protagonists could not but declare "the Cirisfrage ... still of course wide open" (R.O.A.M. Lyne 1978). The dates suggested for the neoteric epyllion about Scylla's fatal passion for Minos range from the mid-first century B.C. to the third century A.D., scholars agreeing nowadays almost (!) universally only that this part of the Appendix Vergiliana is not by Virgil. Under these circumstances, a fresh effort to overcome the present deadlock by mustering up more texts of reference and applying new standards of evaluation may not seem inappropriate. Dating the Ciris correctly solely depends on a correct interpretation of the countless striking parallels in the epyllion with works of nearly all the prominent Latin poets, above all of the Augustan era. In order to achieve utmost impartiality of judgement the author employs not only traditional criteria of chronological priority, but also newly established ones: he makes use of a number of phenomena that he recognised as being typical of quotations in pairs of similia whose chronological relationship is uncontested. Moreover, textual similarities to the Ciris that were hitherto overlooked (or deliberately neglected) are analysed and exploited. Thus, the results of this study seem to be well-grounded: the Ciris was written in the year 26 B.C., probably by Asinius Pollio."-- Publisher's website.
Green Library

15. Classics [2018]

Book
v, 143 pages : illustration ; 20 cm.
Green Library

16. Claudian the poet [2018]

Book
xii, 242 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction-- 1. In Rufinum: heroes, monsters, and the universe in the balance-- 2. The universe ready to be destabilized (IV Cons., Stil., Rapt., Epith.)-- 3. Monsters ready to destabilize the universe (c.m.53, Gig.Gr., Rapt., Eut., VI Cons., Get.)-- 4. The hero keeping the universe stable and restoring the Golden Age (Stil., c.m.27, Get.)-- 5. Not quite the hero (IV Cons., Fesc., Epith.)-- 6. The deceitful poet (Rapt., Epith., Get., VI Cons., Eut.)-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107058347 20180604
This comprehensive reassessment of the carmina maiora of the fourth-century poet Claudian contributes to the growing trend to recognize that Late Antique poets should be approached as just that: poets. Its methodology is developed from that of Michael Roberts' seminal The Jeweled Style. It analyzes Claudian's poetics and use of story telling to argue that the creation of a story world in which Stilicho, his patron, becomes an epic hero, and the barbarians are giants threatening both the borders of Rome and the order of the very universe is designed to convince his audience of a world-view in which it is only the Roman general who stands between them and cosmic chaos. The book also argues that Claudian uses the same techniques to promote the message that Honorius, young hero though he may seem, is not yet fit to rule, and that Stilicho's rightful position remains as his regent.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107058347 20180604
Green Library
Book
xvi, 314 pages ; 21 cm.
  • L'auteur du Commentaire sur les Vers d'or des Pythagoriciens -- L'époque de Hiéroclès -- Aperçu du contenu du Commentaire sur les Vers d'or et du Traité sur la Providence -- Les Vers d'or : nature et interprétation -- Datation et authenticité -- L'auteur -- Nature et rôle -- Exégèse des Vers d'or -- Principes recteurs -- Techniques et procédés -- La doctrine philosophique de Hiéroclès -- Le système de la réalité -- Ordre, Loi, Serment, rang -- Genres et classes, uni-multiplicité : la théologie scientifique -- La relation entre Démiurge et Monde, garante de la cohérence du système -- Le problème du Hiéroclès "chrétien" -- Genres supérieurs et place de l'âme -- La triade des genres supérieurs -- L'essence de l'âme : entre faiblesse et droite raison -- La double destination de l'âme -- Pratique et contemplation -- La "télestiqde" -- Préceptes éthiques -- Providence et liberté humaine -- Le hasard -- Destin et providence -- Collaboration de l'action humaine et du dessein divin -- Les vers d'or pythagoriciens -- Commentaire sur les vers d'or des pythagoriciens -- Traité sur la providence -- Codex 214 -- Codex 251 -- Notes -- Les Vers d'Or pythagoriciens -- Commentaire sur les Vers d'Or des Pythagoriciens -- Traité sur la Providence -- Index nominum et rerum.
"Le Commentaire sur les Vers d'or et le Traité sur la Providence sont deux exemples dignes d'intérêt des écrits des anciens néoplatoniciens. Le premier relève de la littérature exégétique et protreptique et donne l'explication, souvent ingénieuse, d'un court poème issu d'un milieu pythagoricien : il en fait un outil pour le progrès aussi bien moral qu'intellectuel de l'auditeur, en y identifiant des parties spéculatives sur les dieux, les démons et le destin de l'âme ainsi que des préceptes éthiques sur l'amitié, le respect des parents, l'usage de la nourriture etc. destinés à accoutumer l'âme à la pureté et à l'assimiler aux dieux. Le second, connu uniquement par un résumé et des fragments, avait la forme d'une monographie indépendante en sept livres : l'auteur cherchait à y démontrer l'existence de la providence ou théodicée, son rapport au dogme de la réincarnation et sa coopération avec l'action humaine, mais aussi contre toute attente l'accord sur le sujet entre les textes sacrés d'Orphée et des Chaldéens, ainsi qu'entre Platon, Aristote et leur tradition philosophique authentique, par opposition tant aux "renégats" issus de l'Académie et du Péripatos, qu'aux philosophes ouvertement athées tels que les Épicuriens."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
98 pages ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xviii, 425 pages ; 24 cm
  • Part I: A short history of Roman scholarship. The face of learning
  • The origins of Roman grammar
  • Word and world: Varro and his contemporaries
  • Past and present: from Caecilius Epirota to Valerius Probus
  • Finding the right word
  • Dictionaries, glossaries, encyclopedias
  • Commentary and exegesis
  • Grammar and grammarians
  • Author, audience, text
  • Part II: A bibliographical guide. Dictionaries and encyclopedias
  • Commentaries
  • Grammars and other forms of erudition
  • Early medieval grammars.
Critics, Compilers, and Commentators is the first comprehensive introduction to Roman philology-the study of Latin language and Latin texts. It explains its history and forms as they were transformed by changing intellectual and social contexts, and provides description and bibliography of hundreds of surviving dictionaries, commentaries, and grammars.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195380521 20180618
Green Library
Book
x, 397 pages : chiefly color illustrations ; 24 cm.
The protagonists of the ancient novels wandered or were carried off to distant lands, from Italy in the west to Persia in the east and Ethiopia in the south; the authors themselves came, or pretended to come, from remote places such as Aphrodisia and Phoenicia; and the novelistic form had antecedents in a host of classical genres. These intersections are explored in this volume. Papers in the first section discuss "mapping the world in the novels." The second part looks at the dialogical imagination, and the conversation between fiction and history in the novels. Section 3 looks at the way ancient fiction has been transmitted and received. Space, as the locus of cultural interaction and exchange, is the topic of the fourth part. The fifth and final section is devoted to character and emotion, and how these are perceived or constructed in ancient fiction. Overall, a rich picture is offered of the many spatial and cultural dimensions in a variety of ancient fictional genres.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781501511950 20180423
Green Library