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Book
xxxiii, 398 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • 1. Linguistic Anthropology. 2. Language and Culture. 3. The Sounds of Language. 4. Words and Sentences. 5. Sign Language and Nonverbal Communication. 6. Language in Action. 7. Writing and Literacy. 8. How and When is Language Possible? 9. Change and Choice. 10. Doing Linguistic Anthropology.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781337571005 20180319
Learn the methodology, skills, techniques, tools and applications of Linguistic Anthropology with THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF LANGUAGE: AN INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY. This highly readable introductory text emphasizes the kinds of intriguing questions that anthropologists ask about language. The fourth edition brings together the key areas of linguistic anthropology, addressing issues of power, race, gender and class throughout. "In the Field" vignettes draw you into the chapter material and are culled from authors Ottenheimer and Pine's own experiences, among others. Other features--"Doing Linguistic Anthropology" and "Cross-Language Miscommunication"--describe some of the real-life applications of concepts discussed in the text, helping you cement your understanding of the concepts and their relevance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781337571005 20180319
Green Library
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
357 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
xii, 216 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgments ix Introduction. Sublime Abjection 1 1. Other Desires: Ana Mendieta's Abject Imaginings 25 2. Phantom Assholes: Asco's Affective Vortex 57 3. Of Betties Decorous and Abject: Ugly Betty's America la fea and Nao Bustamante's America la bella 89 4. Arriving at Apostasy: Performative Testimonies of Ambivalent Belonging 131 Conclusion. Abject Embodiment 161 Notes 167 Bibliography 193 Index 209.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822370789 20180530
In Abject Performances Leticia Alvarado draws out the irreverent, disruptive aesthetic strategies used by Latino artists and cultural producers who shun standards of respectability that are typically used to conjure concrete minority identities. In place of works imbued with pride, redemption, or celebration, artists such as Ana Mendieta, Nao Bustamante, and the Chicano art collective known as Asco employ negative affects-shame, disgust, and unbelonging-to capture experiences that lie at the edge of the mainstream, inspirational Latino-centered social justice struggles. Drawing from a diverse expressive archive that ranges from performance art to performative testimonies of personal faith-based subjection, Alvarado illuminates modes of community formation and social critique defined by a refusal of identitarian coherence that nonetheless coalesce into Latino affiliation and possibility.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822370789 20180530
Green Library
Book
xv, 255 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Chapter 1. Introduction.- Section I. Social and Advertising Media.- Chapter 2. Functions of urban and Youth language in the new media: The Case of Sheng in Kenya-- Fridah Kanana Erastus and Hildah Kebeya.- Chapter 3. View on the Updating of Nouchi Lexicon and Expressions-- Akissi Beatrice Boutin and Jean-Claude Dodo.- Chapter 4. Social media as an extension of, and negotiation space for, a community of practice: a comparison of Nouchi and Tsotsitaal-- Roland Raoul Kouassi and Ellen Hurst.- Chapter 5. The Use of Addressing Terms in Social Media: The Case of Cameroonian Youth Practices-- Augustin E. Ebongue.- Chapter 6. The Impact of Youth Language on Linguistic Landscapes in Kenya and Tanzania-- Leonard Muaka.- Chapter 7. Creative Use of Urban Youth Language in Advertisements: A Case of Mixing Codes-- Edinah Gesare Mose and Orpha Bonareri Ombati.- Section 2. Music, Performance Poetry and Video.- Chapter 8. Plurality, translingual splinters and music-modality in Nigerian youth languages-- Lasisi Adeiza Isiaka.- Chapter 9. Contestant Hybridities African urban youth language in Nigerian music and social media-- Taiwo Oloruntoba-Oju.- Chapter 10. Linguistic (and non-linguistic) Influences on Urban Performance Poetry in South African Contemporary Youth Culture-- Unathi Nopece.- Chapter 11. Slangs in Yoruba Home Videos: A Morpho-Pragmatic Analysis-- Asiru Hameed Tunde.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319645612 20180508
This book showcases current research on language in new media, the performing arts and music in Africa, emphasising the role that youth play in language change and development. The authors demonstrate how the efforts of young people to throw off old colonial languages and create new local ones has become a site of language creativity. Analysing the language of `new media', including social media, print media and new media technologies, and of creative arts such as performance poetry, hip-hop and rap, they use empirical research from such diverse countries as Cameroon, Nigeria, Kenya, the Ivory Coast and South Africa. This original edited collection will appeal to students and scholars of African sociolinguistics, particularly in the light of the rapidly changing globalized context in which we live.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319645612 20180508
Green Library
Book
x, 176 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • List of Figures Acknowledgments Introduction: Togetherness and Time Chapter 1: Media temporalities: An introduction to the media philosophical approach Chapter 2: Media Aesthetics Chapter 3: Post-Historical Scenes Chapter 4: The Radical Cutting of Experimental Television Chapter 5: Time and Contemporary Television Conclusion Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474293099 20180618
In Against Transmission Barker rethinks the history of audio-visual media as a history of analytical instruments. Rather than viewing media history as the commonly told story of synthetic media (media that make a new whole from connecting separate parts), by focusing on the analytical function of mediation Against Transmission is able to focus on the way that media that have historically been used to count, measure and analyse experience still continue to provide the condition for contemporary life. By studying the engineering of transmission, transduction and storage through the prism of process philosophy, the book interrogates how the understanding of media-as-machine may offer new ways to describe a particular phenomenological relationship to the world, asking: what can the hardware of machines that segment information into very small elements tell us about experiences of time, memory and history? This book offers both a detailed and radical investigation of the technical architecture of media such as television, computers, cameras, and cinematography. It achieves this through in-depth archive research into the history of the development of media technology, combined with innovative readings of key concepts from philosophers of media such as Harold A. Innis, Marshall McLuhan, Friedrich Kittler, Siegfried Zielinski and Wolfgang Ernst. Teaming philosophical inquiry with thorough technical and historical analysis, in a broad range of international case studies, from early experimental cinema and television to contemporary media art and innovative hardware developments, Barker shows how the technical discoveries made in these contexts have engineered the experiences of time in contemporary media culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474293099 20180618
Green Library
Book
xi, 286 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
vi, 313 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
The use of corpora has conventionally been envisioned as being either corpus-based or corpus-driven. While the formal definition of the latter term has been widely accepted since it was established by Tognini-Bonelli (2001), it is often applied to studies that do not, in fact, fullfil the fundamental requirement of a theory-neutral starting point. This volume proposes the term pattern-driven as a more precise alternative. The chapters illustrate a variety of methods that fall under this broad methodology, such as the extraction of lexical bundles, POS-grams and semantic frames, and demonstrate how these approaches can uncover new understandings of both synchronic and diachronic linguistic phenomena.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789027264565 20180508
Green Library
Book
xiii, 211 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
xvi, 207 pages : illustrations, map ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgements List of Tables, Figures, Pictures and Maps Preface Chapter 1 Language, Identity and Conflictã 1. Introductionã 1.1 Identity and identitiesã 1.1.1 Conflicting identities: Palestinian-Jewish relationships inside Israelã 1.2 Language and social identityã 1.2.1 The Arabic language and social identityã 1.2.2 Language and identity in Israelã 1.3 The vitality of Arabic in Israelã 1.4 Language and conflictã 1.4.1 The role of language in the Arab-Israeli conflictã 1.5 Conclusion Chapter 2 Internal and External Challenges of the Arabic Languageã 2. Introductionã 2.1 Internal challengesã 2.1.1 Diglossia: Old and new challengesã 2.1.2 Modernization and the Arabic languageã 2.2 External challengesã 2.2.1 Colonialism, globalization and the Arabic languageã 2.3 Policy towards Arabic in the Arab world: Encountering challenges ã 2.4 Conclusion Chapter 3 Internal and Regional Contexts and the Arabic Language in Israelã 3. Introduction ã 3.1 Internal contextsã 3.2 Regional contextsã 3.3 Conclusion Chapter 4 The Status of the Arabic Language in Israelã 4.1 The linguistic situation in Israel 4.2 The status of Arabic in Israelã 4.3 Conclusion Chapter 5 Features of the Arabic Language in Israel5.1 Introductionã 5.2 Arabic in Israel5.2.1 Is there a unique variety of Arabic in Israel?ã 5.2.2 Influences from other Arabic varieties 5.3 Conclusion Chapter 6 Arabic in the Shadow of Hebraizationã 6.1 Hebrew is the dominant language in Israelã 6.1.1 Building the new Jewish-Israeli identityã 6.1.2 Putting Hebrew on the national agendaã 6.1.3 Teaching Hebrewã 6.1.4 Hebraization consequencesã 6.2 Ideologized Hebrew and its teaching to Palestinian pupils in Israelã 6.2.1 Attitudes towards teaching Hebrew to Palestinian Arabsã 6.2.2 The Policy of teaching Hebrew: Goals and curriculaã 6.2.3 A new curriculumã 6.2.4 Textbooks and contentsã 6.2.5 Consequences of Hebraization for teachingã 6.3 The Penetration of Hebrew into the `heart of Arabic': Borrowingã 6.3.1 Introductionã 6.3.2 Cultural contact and its linguistic reflectionsã 6.3.3 The importance of the study of Hebrewã 6.3.4 The knowledge and use of Hebrewã 6.3.5 Borrowing lexical items from Hebrew: Integration and diffusionã 6.3.6 Borrowing and its linguistic characteristicsã 6.3.7 The consequences of Hebraization on borrowing Chapter 7 English in the Palestinian Linguistic Repertoire in Israelã 7.1 Introductionã 7.2 English teaching in the Palestinian schools in Israelã 7.2.1 The current English curriculumã 7.2.2 Textbooksã 7.2.3 Achievementsã 7.3 Borrowing from Englishã 7.4 Globalization and Englishã 7.5 Writing with Latin and Hebrew lettersã 7.6 Conclusion Chapter 8 Hebraization of Arabic Place Namesã 8.1 Introductionã 8.2 Hebraizing names: The translation of ideological orientation and political thinkingã 8.3 Conclusion Chapter 9 The Current Linguistic Landscape in the Palestinian Arab Localities in Israelã 9.1 Linguistic landscape- A brief backgroundã 9.1.1 Studies on linguistic landscape in Israelã 9.2 The Palestinian Arab linguistic landscape in Israelã 9.2.1 Hebrew and Hebraizationã 9.2.2 Palestinian Arab uniquenessã 9.2.3 Conclusionã 9.3 The linguistic landscape from a different perspective: Umm-el-Fahm as a case studyã 9.3.1 Umm-el-Fahm: Backgroundã 9.3.2 The linguistic landscape in the cityã 9.3.3 Conclusions Chapter 10 The Arabic Language in the Palestinian Arab Education Systemã 10.1 Introductionã 10.2 The effect of the Arabic curricula on the Palestinian Arab identityã 10.3 The hurdles blocking the achievement of high competence in Standard Arabicã 10.4 What is the role of the Arabic language in the Palestinian Arab education system?ã 10.5 Conclusion Chapter 11 Teaching Arabic in Jewish Schools: Language of the Neighbour or the Enemy?ã 11.1 Introductionã 11.2 Teaching the Arabic languageã 11.3 Jewish attitudes towards the Arabic languageã 11.4 Goals of teaching Arabicã 11.5 Bilingual schools: Hand-in-Hand schoolsã 11.6 Conclusion Chapter 12 Language Ideology and Attitudes: Arabic Language Academies and Future Vision Documentsã 12.1 Language ideology and attitudes towards Arabicã 12.1.1 The Communist Party and the Democratic Frontã 12.1.2 Balad Partyã 12.1.3 The Islamic Movementã 12.1.4 Civil organizationsã 12.2 Surveyã 12.3 Conclusionã 12.4 Arabic language academies in the Israeli context: Between the research role and nationalist aspirationsã 12.4.1Arabic language academiesã 12.4.1.1 A brief backgroundã 12.4.1.2 The Cairo Academy as an exampleã 12.4.1.3 The Cairo Academy: Goals, committees and achievementsã 12.4.2 Arabic Language Academies in Israelã 12.4.2.1 The formation of the Arabic Language Academy in Israel ã 12.4.2.2 The official Arabic language academyã 12.4.2.3 The Al-Qasemi Arabic Language Academyã 12.4.3 Conclusionã 12.5 The role of Arabic according to future vision documentsã 12.5.1 Introductionã 12.5.2 Arabic in the future vision documentsã 12.5.3 Conclusion Chapter 13 Epilogue - Facing the Challenges ã 13.1 Challenges of the Arabic languageã 13.2 Facing the challenges ã 13.2.1 Arabic as a strategic choice for building an Arab knowledge society ã 13.2.2 Meeting the challenges: Building a frameworkã 13.3 Practical proposalsã 13.4 Conclusion Referencesã Indexã .
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138063556 20171204
In Arabic in Israel, Muhammad Amara analyses the status of Arabic following the creation of the State of Israel and documents its impact on the individual and collective identity of Israel's Palestinian Arab citizens. The interplay of language and identity in conflict situations is also examined. This work represents the culmination of many years of research on Arabic linguistic repertoire and educational policy regarding the language of the Palestinian citizens of Israel. It draws all of these factors together while linking them to local, regional and global developments. Its perspective is interdisciplinary and, as such, examines the topic from a number of angles including linguistic, social, cultural and political.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138063556 20171204
Green Library
Book
viii, 266 pages ; 23 cm
  • Contents and AbstractsIntroduction: The Colonial History of Comparative Method chapter abstractThis chapter reconsiders Edward Said's call for a return to philology, the consequence of his career-long engagement with Erich Auerbach's work. It argues that Said and Auerbach privileged the new philology because they ignored its colonial matrix. On one hand, the new philology annulled the dream of recovering the divine language spoken before destruction of the Tower of Babel and preserved this dream in a higher form. The new philology was the science that would make sense of everything human, turning linguistic confusion into total knowledge-hence its attraction to Said, Auerbach, and countless other comparatists. But the new philology's original utility lay in its capacity to reconstruct South Asia's otherwise incommensurable legal and literary traditions and to make them legitimize colonial rule. This chapter places colonial philology at the origins of comparatism and "World Literature": both their materials and their need to be understood as colonial legacies. 1First Stratum: The Literary. The Persian Imperium and Hafiz, 1771 A.D. - 1390 A.D. chapter abstractThis chapter excavates the colonial roots of comparative (or historical) grammar. East India Company scholars used this nascent discipline to reconstruct the languages and literatures they encountered in South Asia. Historical grammar helped produce the Romantic definition of literature to which we still cling: an aesthetic practice attuned to language's performative (or "literary") power. In fact, only after the advent of colonial rule-as European scholars began to re-interpret non-European verbal art according to this standard-could such a definition of literature appear universally valid. Our concept of literature must be understood, therefore, as the product of colonization. It has globalized new philological values while effacing the antithetical practices that helped constitute precolonial traditions. This chapter focuses on Sir William Jones's A Grammar of the Persian of Language and "A Persian Song of Hafiz, " a translation of Hafiz's ghazal "The Shirazi Turk." 2Second Stratum: The Immanent. Sharia and the Muallaqat, 1782 A.D. - 550 A.D. chapter abstractThis chapter studies the origins of colonial law, which sought to define the immanent traditions of the East India Company's Muslim and Hindu subjects. Its premise was that such traditions could be found only in their canonical texts. The identification of a culture's canonical texts and its immanent principles eventually became as fundamental to the methods of literary history as it was to those of colonial rule. But the identification of authoritative texts and immanent traditions has only served to obscure-indeed turn inside out-their actual relationship. To the extent that sharia had been an immanent tradition, it turned not on the production of authoritative texts but rather on practices that defended communities from the dangers of textual authority. Focusing on William Jones's codification of sharia and his translation of the Muallaqat, this chapter returns to the discursive practices colonial and postcolonial ideologies of the text have eclipsed. 3Third Stratum: The Originary. The Dharma and Sakuntala, 1794 A.D. - 1400 B.C. chapter abstractWilliam Jones's Indo-European hypothesis triggered a feverish quest throughout the nineteenth century to reconstruct every language's root words and hence map human development in its historical totality. The humanities are still shaped by the relationship Jones posited between the roots and evolution of languages on one hand and the origins and development of culture on the other. This chapter calls this model into question by studying its colonial history and logic. European philosophers, poets, and philologists identified the dharma texts Jones translated, The Laws of Manu and Sakuntala, with humanity's original (non-violent or ecological) consciousness. An archaeological approach reveals that these texts were in fact deeply implicated in Indo-European violence: i.e., the burning of the forests, the dispossession and displacement of its inhabitants, and the erasure of their way of life. Ecological sensitivity can belong only to those forms of life that textual culture attempted to destroy. Conclusion: Genealogies of Emergency chapter abstractThis chapter argues that states of emergency, which define global politics now, were prefigured in colonial law and philology. In fact, the rule of law in colonial India devolved almost immediately into emergencies, which the East India Company imposed on native populations at its frontiers. The historical function of colonial law and philology was to circumscribe legal authority within the state. The transfer of such authority from the people to the executive is the very definition of emergency. But far from understanding the disturbing relationship between philology (the methodological foundation of the humanities) and the emergency (the global subversion of democracy taking place all around us today), leading theorists instead consider new philological concepts of language the very antithesis of extralegal sovereignty. To move beyond this methodological impasse, this chapter studies Benjamin's "On the Concept of History, " which opposed historical method and emergency powers at the same time.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503604025 20180508
For more than three decades, preeminent scholars in comparative literature and postcolonial studies have called for a return to philology as the indispensable basis of critical method in the humanities. Against such calls, this book argues that the privilege philology has always enjoyed within the modern humanities silently reinforces a colonial hierarchy. In fact, each of philology's foundational innovations originally served British rule in India. Tracing an unacknowledged history that extends from British Orientalist Sir William Jones to Palestinian American intellectual Edward Said and beyond, Archaeology of Babel excavates the epistemic transformation that was engendered on a global scale by the colonial reconstruction of native languages, literatures, and law. In the process, it reveals the extent to which even postcolonial studies and European philosophy-not to mention discourses as disparate as Islamic fundamentalism, Hindu nationalism, and global environmentalism-are the progeny of colonial rule. Going further, it unearths the alternate concepts of language and literature that were lost along the way and issues its own call for humanists to reckon with the politics of the philological practices to which they now return.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503604025 20180508
Green Library
Book
vi, 418 pages ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction. Part I: Phrasal and Clausal Architecture. 2. Functional categories and agreement. 3. Proxy categories in phrase structure theory (with Lea Nash). 4. Bod in the present tense and in other tenses. Part II: Clitics and Phrase Structure. 5. Clitic placement and the Wackernagel position in European Portuguese. 6. Cliticization as Unselective Attract (with Lea Nash). Part III: The Architecture of Derivations. 7. VP ellipsis, phases and the syntax of morphology. 8. Hallmarks of Portuguese syntax. 9. Computational and semantic aspects of resumption. Part IV. The Architecture of Grammar. 10. Intervention or phasal locality? Two ways of being local in French causative constructions. 11. The expletive puzzle and the EPP.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138082472 20180319
This volume collects eleven papers written between 1991 and 2016, some of them unpublished, which explore various aspects of the architecture of grammar in a minimalist perspective. The phenomena that are brought to bear on the architectural issue come from a range of languages, among them French, European Portuguese, Welsh, German and English, and include clitic placement, expletive pronouns, resumption, causative structures, copulative and existential constructions, VP ellipsis, as well as the distinction between the SVO, VSO and V2 linguistic types. This book sheds a new light on the division of labor between components and paves the way for further research on grammatical architecture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138082472 20180319
Green Library
Book
x, 206 pages : illustration ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xii, 265 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
Why can't a Quechua speaker wear pants? Anna M. Babel uses this question to open an analysis of language and social structure at the border of eastern and western, highland and lowland Bolivia. Through an exploration of categories such as political affiliation, ethnic identity, styles of dress, and histories of migration, she describes the ways that people understand themselves and others as Quechua speakers, Spanish speakers, or something in between. Between the Andes and the Amazon is ethnography in storytelling form, a rigorous yet sensitive exploration of how people understand themselves and others as members of social groups through the words and languages they use. Drawing on fifteen years of ethnographic research, Babel offers a close examination of how people produce oppositions, even as they might position themselves "in between" those categories. These oppositions form the raw material of the social system that people accept as "normal" or "the way things are." Meaning-making happens through language use and language play, Babel explains, and the practice of using Spanish versus Quechua is a claim to an identity or a social position. Babel gives personal perspectives on what it is like to live in this community, focusing on her own experiences and those of her key consultants. Between the Andes and the Amazon opens new ways of thinking about what it means to be a speaker of an Indigenous or colonial language-or a mix of both.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780816537266 20180514
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (1 volume) : illustrations
Book
vi, 403 pages : color illustrations ; 25 cm.
This collection brings together leading names in the field of bilingualism research to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Studies in Bilingualism series. Over the last 25 years the study of bilingualism has received a tremendous amount of attention from linguists, psychologists, cognitive scientists, and neuroscientists. The breadth of coverage in this volume is a testament to the many different aspects of bilingualism that continue to generate phenomenal interest in the scholarly community. The bilingual experience is captured through a multifaceted prism that includes aspects of language and literacy development in child bilinguals with and without developmental language disorders, language processing and mental representations in adult bilinguals across the lifespan, and the cognitive and neurological basis of bilingualism. Different theoretical approaches - from generative UG-based models to constructivist usage-based models - are brought to bear on the nature of bilingual linguistic knowledge. The end result is a compendium of the state-of-the-art of a field that is in constant evolution and that is on an upward trajectory of discovery.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789027200150 20180416
Green Library
Book
xiii, 322 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction 2. Minimalism (with Cedric Boeckx) 3. Minimalizing Language Evolution: The Minimalist Program and the Evolutionary Sharping of Language (with Victor M. Longa & Guillermo Lorenzo) 4. Clarifying the Notion "Parameter" 5. Regarding the Third Factor: Arguments for a CLASH Model 6. A Geneticist's Dream, a Linguist's Nightmare: The Case of FOXP2 (with Massimo Pittelli-Palmarini) 7. The Archaeological Record Speaks: Bridging Anthropology and Linguistics (with Sergio Balari, Antonio Benitez-Burraco, Marta Camps, Victor M. Longa, & Guillermo Lorenzo) 8. A Framework for the Comparative Study of Language (with James A. Reggia & Gerald S. Wilkinson) 9. The Immune Syntax Revisited: Opening New Windows on Language Evolution (with Antonio Benitez-Burraco) 10. Epilogue, Prologue - or What?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138082458 20180717
This volume collects some of Juan Uriagereka's previously published pieces and presentations on biolinguistics in recent years in one comprehensive volume. The book's introduction lays the foundation for the field of biolinguistics, which looks to integrate concepts from the natural sciences in the analysis of natural language, situating the discussion within the minimalist framework. The volume then highlights eight of the author's key papers from the literature, some co-authored, representative of both the architectural and evolutionary considerations to be taken into account within biolinguistic research. The book culminates in a final chapter showcasing the body of work being done on biolinguistics within the research program at the University of Maryland and their implications for interdisciplinary research and future directions for the field. This volume is essential reading for students and scholars interested in the interface between language and the natural sciences, including linguistics, syntax, biology, archaeology, and anthropology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138082458 20180717
Green Library
Book
4 volumes : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Volume 1. Foundations, Language Design, Human-Animal studies, Unification
  • volume 2. Language Development, Acquisition, Impairments
  • volume 3. Language Variation, Parameters, Evolution
  • volume 4. Complexity, Grammar, Human/Animal Divide, Brain Studies.
Biolinguistics, the study of the relation between humans' biology and the properties of the Language Faculty, is an emergent and lively field, and is central to linguistics. It gives rise to lively debates on the origin of language, and the specificity of human language in the animal kingdom as well as the biological basis of the human language capacities. This new four volume collection will assemble important contributions to the field, exploring the foundations of the subject and language development, variation in languages and biology, and complexities in language and biology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138859159 20180122
Green Library
Book
ix, 84 pages ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
vi, 199 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Building the corpus. Data collection and profile of the speakers in our corpus
  • Transcription of the data
  • Code-switching vs. borrowing: New implications arising from our data
  • Using the corpus. The grammar of code-switching
  • Code-switching and independent variables
  • Change in Welsh grammar
  • Additional research using Siarad
  • Conclusion and future directions.
This book is a research monograph divided into two parts. The first part describes the methods used to build the first sizeable corpus of informal conversational data collected from bilingual speakers of Welsh and English: Siarad. The second part describes the linguistic analysis of data from this corpus (available at bangortalk.org.uk). The information in Part One will be useful as a `how to' manual on building a bilingual spoken corpus, including methods of data collection, transcription, glossing and analysis. The findings reported in Part Two throw new light on the debate regarding code-switching vs. borrowing, the application of the Matrix Language Framework (MLF) to the grammar of Welsh-English code-switching, the extralinguistic factors influencing variation in quantity of code-switching, and the extent to which the grammar of Welsh is changing in contact with English. Additional findings by other researchers using the corpus are also reported, and possible future directions are discussed.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789027264589 20180702
Green Library