Book
332 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
The American Dream: From Pop to present presents an overview of the development of American printmaking since 1960, paying particular attention to key figures such as Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg and Andy Warhol. The 1960s was a period of change in the production, marketing and consumption of prints and the medium attracted a new generation of artists whose attitude towards making art had been conditioned by the monumentality and bold, eye-catching nature of popular imagery in postwar America, from advertising billboards to drive-in movies. Artists used to working on large canvases and huge sculptures created prints of an unprecedented ambition, scale and boldness in state-of-the-art workshops newly established on both the East and West coasts. Prints also became a means for expressing opinions on the great social issues of the day, from civil rights to the overt and covert role of government. This has continued, with feminism, gender, the body, race and identity, all topics represented in prints in a variety of stylistic approaches across the decades. The changing nature of American society provides a core element of the narrative, with prints offering a fascinating insight into contemporary thinking and attitudes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780500239605 20170530
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xiv, 354 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 27 cm
Garo Z. Antreasian (b. 1922) belongs to the great generation of innovators in mid-twentieth-century American art. While influenced by a variety of European artists in his early years, it was his involvement with Tamarind Lithography Workshop starting in 1960 that transformed his work. As Tamarind's founding technical director, he revolutionized the medium of lithography. He discovered how to manipulate the spontaneous possibilities of lithography in the manner of the Abstract Expressionist painters. In addition to reflecting on his work, he writes movingly about his Armenian heritage and its importance in his art, his teaching, and his love affair with all sorts of artistic media. Illustrating his drawings, paintings, and prints, this book reveals Antreasian as a major American artist. This book was made possible in part by generous contributions from the Frederick Hammersley Foundation and Gerald Peters Gallery.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826355416 20160619
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xv, 256 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm
  • "Under the wave off Kanagawa"
  • International nationalism
  • America's Japan
  • Lifestyle branding
  • Placemaking.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
197 pages : illustrations, some color ; 30 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
182 pages : color illustrations ; 32 cm
Polychrome prints, or ukiyo-e, first appeared in Japan in the late 18th century. Delicately hued and intricate, they depicted landscapes, scenes and figures that epitomised the country's idea of "the floating world": a place whose denizens lived for the moment and appreciated the pleasures of the natural world. This volume surveys the prominent Barbara S. Bowman collection of prints notable for a number of reasons: an excellently preserved print of Lucky Dream for the New Year: Mt. Fuji, Falcon and Eggplants by Suzuki Harunobu; a number of surmono, or privately published prints that were created with unusually luxurious materials; and numerous works by Hiroshige and Hokusai, who are considered the masters of the art form. Each of the one hundred prints in this book is reproduced in large color plates that highlight their subtle beauty and charm and are accompanied by extensive captions that describe the pieces' remarkable qualities. This book also includes a comprehensive introduction to the collection by LACMA curator Hollis Goodall, who discusses the significance of the Bowman collection and the many ways it enhances the museum's extensive holdings of Japanese art. Published in association with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783791354729 20160619
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xxxi, 270 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm.
  • The Fashion Print
  • Contextualizing the Fashion Print
  • The Fashion Print as a Historical Resource.
Between 1678 and 1710, Parisian presses printed hundreds of images of elegantly attired men and women dressed in the latest mode, and posed to display every detail of their clothing and accessories. Long used to illustrate dress of the period, these fashion prints have been taken at face value and used uncritically. Drawing on perspectives from art history, costume history, French literature, museum conservation and theatrical costuming, the essays in this volume explore what the prints represent and what they reveal about fashion and culture in the seventeenth century. With more than one hundred illustrations, Fashion Prints in the Age of Louis XIV constitutes not only an innovative analysis of fashion engravings, but also one of the most comprehensive collections of seventeenth-century fashion images available in print.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780896728578 20160617
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
109 pages : chiefly illustrations (some color) ; 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
90 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 112 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 31 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
152 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
This is a wonderfully revealing collection of letters written by M.C. Escher to his son George, touching on everything from Escher's art to his friends and family. Maurits Cornelis Escher (1898-1972) is one of the world's most popular and admired modern artists, his engravings and lithographs are immediately recognizable for their architectural explorations of infinity. From 1958 until his death in 1972, the Dutch artist wrote letters to his son George who had moved to Canada. The correspondence reproduced here - originally in Dutch and translated into English - discusses Escher's work, including current projects, collaborative books on his art, the sale of his prints, and the production of various films on his life. The letters also make reference to the artist's health, his family and friends, his personal reading, current events and the celebrities, political officials and academics who came into contact with Escher over the course of his career notably F.D. Roosevelt, Stanley Kubrick and Dr. Arthur L. Loeb. Accompanying the letters are an introduction by George Escher, a selection of family photographs, and several full page colour plates of Escher's work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780888849182 20160612
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 214 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
The iconic bicep-flexing poster image of "Rosie the Riveter" has long conveyed the impression that women were welcomed into the World War II work force and admired for helping "free a man to fight." Donna Knaff, however, shows that "Rosie" only revealed part of the reality and that women depicted in other World War II visual art--both in the private sector and the military--reflected decidedly mixed feelings about the status of women within American society. "Beyond Rosie the Riveter" takes readers back to a time before television's dominance, to the golden age of print art and its singular power over public opinion. Focusing specifically on instances of "female masculinity" when women entered previously all-male fields, Knaff places these images within the context of popular discussions of gender roles and examines their historical, cultural, and textual contexts. As Knaff reveals, visual messages received by women through war posters, magazine cartoons, comic strips, and ads may have acknowledged their importance to the war effort but also cautioned them against taking too many liberties or losing their femininity. Her study examines the subtle and not-so subtle cultural battles that played out in these popular images, opening a new window on American women's experience. Some images implicitly argued that women should maintain their femininity despite adopting masculinity for the war effort; others dealt with society's deep-seated fear that masculinized women might feminize men; and many reflected the dilemma that a woman was both encouraged to express and suppress her sexuality so that she might be perceived as neither promiscuous nor lesbian. From these cases, Knaff draws a common theme: while being outwardly empowered or celebrated for their wartime contributions, women were kept in check by being held responsible for everything from distracting male co-workers to compromising machinery with their long hair and jewelry. Knaff also notes the subtle distinctions among the images: government war posters targeted blue-collar women, New Yorker content was aimed at socialites, Collier's addressed middle-class women, and Wonder Woman was geared to young girls. Especially through its focus on visual arts, Knaff's book gives us a new look at American society decades before the modern women's rights movement, torn between wartime needs and antiquated gender roles. It provides much-needed nuance to a glossed-over chapter in our history, charting the difficult negotiations that granted--and ultimately took back--American women's wartime freedoms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780700618507 20160614
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
vii, 122 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 x 29 cm.
  • Introduction : Frank Lloyd Wright, American Secessionist
  • Catalogue of the Secessionist prints in the Frank Lloyd Wright Collection.
These Secessionist art prints, acquired by Frank Lloyd Wright and his lover Mamah Borthwick Cheney during their infamous flight to Europe in 1909-1910, reveal a new dimension of the architect's taste and aesthetic preferences. This previously unknown and newly discovered group of prints from his personal art collection shows that around the turn of the twentieth century Wright had a surprising interest in European artists pursuing their own versions of modernism. Identified from careful archival research, the prints demonstrate how richly diffuse and multifaceted modernism was before the codification of a modernist canon. Wright, a revolutionary architect, preferred the work of Secessionists to that of the avant-garde of expressionism, cubism, and futurism. To Wright, the artists he selected were modern, and they appealed deeply to his interest in landscapes and graphic techniques of reproduction. In Frank Lloyd Wright, Art Collector, Anthony Alofsin presents the first catalogue raisonne of the thirty-two prints and one original drawing that constitute Wright's Secessionist collection. Alofsin explores Wright's encounters with German and Austrian art before his travels to Europe; the fluid definition of modern art around 1909; and the complex context for Wright's acquiring this collection while in Europe. This book, with its original research, puts into a new light a range of artists--some famous, others unknown--who sought to express, like Wright, their own rebellion against academic traditions. A unique contribution to the history of modern art, Frank Lloyd Wright, Art Collector offers stunningly original insights into the master's artistic taste, as well as to a group of progressive artists whose work has been undeservedly overlooked in conventional histories of modernism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292737211 20160608
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xiv, 466 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 29 cm.
Artist, scholar, writer, and educator, Clinton Adams (1918-2002) was recognized as one of the most important influences on the development of fine-art printmaking in America. He was one of the founders of the renowned Tamarind Institute, instrumental in reviving the art of lithography. Adams was also a prolific printmaker himself. His work was characterized by a mix of traditional representation and modernist abstraction, rendered, as the title of this catalogue suggests, with his incomparably meticulous serenity.Adams had more than thirty solo exhibitions, and his works are in the collections of major museums all over the country. This catalogue raisonn accounts for all of his work and traces the varieties of techniques and collaborations that make lithography a particularly complex medium to keep track of. It also includes numerous comments from the artist about the genesis of the work, the technical challenges he and his printers faced, and his own assessments of quality and significance. A lively biographical essay recalls Adams's extra-artistic skills as well, reminding us that he was a great administrator and teacher, and a formidable poker player.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826347725 20160609
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xxii, 295 p. : col. ill., map ; 27 cm.
  • The first fifty years of commercial lithography in Philadelphia : an overview of the trade, 1828-1878 / Erika Piola and Jennifer Ambrose
  • Putting Philadelphia on stone : an introduction to the techniques used / Michael Twyman
  • James Queen : chronicler of Philadelphia / Sara W. Duke
  • Peter S. Duval, Philadelphia's leading lithographer / Sarah J. Weatherwax
  • Lithographed plates for books and periodicals : a mainstay of Philadelphia lithographers / Christopher W. Lane
  • Commercial architecture in Philadelphia lithographs / Dell Upton
  • Drawn on the spot : Philadelphia sensational news-event lithographs / Erika Piola
  • Philadelphia lithography and American landscape / Donald H. Cresswell.
"A collection of essays examining the history of nineteenth-century commercial lithography in Philadelphia. Analyzes the social, economic, and technological changes in the local trade from 1828 to 1878"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
191 p. : ill., map ; 23 x 28 cm.
  • The Whistler legacy in Venice
  • Ernest David Roth
  • John Taylor Arms
  • Fabio Mauroner
  • Printmakers in Venice, 1900-1945: other masters.
In the 1880s, James McNeil Whistler revolutionized the way artists represented the city of Venice by producing images that moved away from the major tourist monuments to depict the squares, back alleys, and isolated canals that only residents knew. His novel approach inspired generations of printmakers who worked in Venice, and this book celebrates their work. Ernest David Roth (1879-1964) was one of the most significant American etchers of the first half of the 20th century, and his most important achievements are the views he did of Venice between 1905 and 1941. Roth and his friends John Taylor Arms and Louis Rosenberg formed the nucleus of a circle of American etchers that created a timeless vision of European and American cityscapes and landscapes in the 1920s and 1930s, and their Venetian views are at the centre of their accomplishment. Eric Denker is a senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780982615645 20160609
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
463 pages: illustrations; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
304 p. : col. ill. ; 31 cm
American sculptor, designer, print artist Harry Bertoia (1915-1978) made thousands of monoprints on rice paper to record his shape ideas. Many ultimately became the basis of sculptures during his forty-year career. Here over 1500 of his fascinating monoprints are presented with their identifying numbers and dimensions. The importance of these artworks to Bertoia's career is acknowledged. Contributions to the text from Bertoia's children present their feelings when they see these astounding images and recall the years of enthusiastic discussions with their father. The book adds an important volume to references about Harry Bertoia's work, which includes sculpture as commissions for institutions throughout America.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780764338502 20160612
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
291 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
172 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
[36] p. : ill. (some col.), ports. ; 22 x 24 cm.
Green Library