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Book
145 pages : map ; 22 cm
  • Sigles employés -- Présentation de l'UAM -- Un parcours inattendu -- Les fondamentaux de la gouvernance -- Gouvernance des ressources -- Gouvernance académique -- Gouvernance de la recherche -- Gouvernance de la vie universitaire.
"Habibou Abarchi a parcouru à la fois les cursus professionnel, universitaire et administratif de l'Université de Niamey. Ayant une expérience complète (étudiant, enseignant, conseiller du ministre, doyen, recteur), il nous livre ses réflexions sur son expérience de direction : comment s'efforcer, concrètement, de pratiquer la bonne gouvernance universitaire ? Au Niger, tous les responsables (chefs de département, doyen, recteur) de l'université sont élus pour trois ans, renouvelables une seule fois. Cette autonomie relative (car elle n'est pas vraiment financière) entraîne en contrepartie un plus grand nombre d'obligations pour le recteur : aussi bien envers le ministère de tutelle qu'à l'égard des enseignants-chercheurs, du personnel administratif et des étudiants. Après une présentation synthétique de l'Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, l'auteur dresse un bilan critique de ce qu'il a pu réaliser en matière de gouvernance : il passe au crible les ressources, le fonctionnement académique, le développement de la recherche et la vie universitaire. L'étude met en relief aussi bien les aspects positifs que les points de blocage et les difficultés à surmonter. Un bilan fort utile, le premier du genre, qui peut servir aux autres universités du Niger et d'Afrique."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
60, 52 pages ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
376 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
455 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
East Asia Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • Contents and AbstractsIntroduction chapter abstractThis chapter introduces the question of Saudi "religious expansion" - that is, the various processes by which Saudi actors are said to have exerted increasing religious influence beyond the kingdom's borders in the course of the twentieth century - and it situates the Islamic University of Medina as a key institution in relation to such dynamics. It establishes the contours of the Salafi and Wahhabi traditions, before setting out the historiographical framework employed throughout the remainder of the book. The latter is grounded in a particular conception of a transnational religious economy, comprising flows - both within and across borders - of material capital, spiritual capital, religious migrants and social technologies. The chapter ends with a brief overview of the historical narrative and arguments that run through the book. 1Transformations in the Late Ottoman Hijaz chapter abstractThis chapter develops an account of education in mosques, madrasas and Sufi lodges in the Hijaz in the Ottoman period which hosted scholars and students from across the Islamic world. It shows that education in these settings was supported by a variety of cross-border flows of material capital, that methods of instruction were largely personalized and informal, and that these arrangements fostered a religious economy marked by considerable diversity. However, from the end of the nineteenth century, new social technologies brought by religious migrants and imperial officials contributed to the spread of increasingly rationalized, bureaucratized modes of pedagogy. The chapter argues that these new practices paved the way for private and particularly state actors to exercise more sustained control over the distribution, exchange and translation of material and spiritual capital in religious educational settings. 2Wahhabi Expansion in Saudi-Occupied Mecca chapter abstractThis chapter explores the use of education as a tool for expanding Wahhabi influence in the Hijaz, in the period immediately following its occupation by the Saudis in the 1920s. This project was fraught with tensions, occurring as it did in the context of a process of state-building within an occupied territory with its own religious traditions quite different from those of the Wahhabi heartlands of Najd. The chapter argues that this period saw the consolidation of numerous strategies - including not only material investment but also cultural appropriation, hegemonic modification of religious discourse, and the recruitment of migrants from across the Middle East to lend legitimacy to Wahhabi proselytizing - which would later become central to the role of education in expanding Saudi religious influence beyond the Peninsula. These arguments are illustrated with reference to the content and styles of teaching that developed in the Saudi Scholastic Institute in Mecca. 3National Politics and Global Mission chapter abstractThis chapter traces the genesis and institutional evolution of the Islamic University of Medina from the time of its founding in 1961 and over the decades that followed. It maps the history of this key Wahhabi missionary project onto Cold War geopolitics, maneuvering between the Saudi royals and the Wahhabi establishment, efforts to bolster narratives of dynastic and national legitimacy, and shifts in the international oil economy. In doing so, it emphasizes the extent to which the transactions in material and spiritual capital which would occur on the IUM campus were influenced by Saudi politics and integrated with the kingdom's own political economy. 4Migration and the Forging of a Scholarly Community chapter abstractThis chapter explores the role of large numbers of non-Saudi staff members at the Islamic University of Medina (IUM) from the early 1960s to the 1980s, and considers the part that they played in the remaking of Wahhabi religious authority. It argues that until the mid-twentieth century, the relatively parochial and insular nature of the Wahhabi scholarly milieu meant that Wahhabi scholars lacked the kinds of symbolic resources that would be required to launch such an ambitious missionary project. It then traces the trajectories that brought migrants from across the Middle East, Africa, South Asia and beyond to work at the IUM. It argues that, by bringing diversified reserves of spiritual capital - including qualifications acquired in venerable centers of learning like al-Azhar - these migrants lent legitimacy to the new effort to extend the Wahhabi mission to broad audiences beyond the kingdom's borders. 5Rethinking Religious Instruction chapter abstractThis chapter considers the styles of pedagogy which took shape at the Islamic University of Medina from the time of its founding. It argues that the university was viewed by many of those involved as a response to imperial intrusions in the cultural sphere in the colonized parts of the Islamic world in which a large proportion of them had been born and raised. At the same time, rather than engaging in an effort to shore up what had come to be seen as traditional modes of religious schooling, they instead sought to actively appropriate social technologies of education whose own genealogies traced back to European metropoles and to rework them in the name of what was understood to consist in a project of cultural resistance. 6A Wahhabi Corpus in Motion chapter abstractThis chapter considers the content of teaching at the Islamic University of Medina, from the time of its founding and over the decades that followed. While IUM syllabuses were from the start strongly influenced by Wahhabi norms, the bodies of knowledge that were to be transmitted to its students underwent certain subtle shifts over time. These shifts in many ways map onto, and no doubt in part reflect, the broader evolution of the Wahhabi tradition in the second half of the twentieth century. However, the chapter highlights evidence that they also related to the university's status as a node within a transnational religious economy and its engagement in far-reaching struggles to steer the course of the Islamic tradition. 7Leaving Medina chapter abstractThis chapter explores the role of the Islamic University of Medina's non-Saudi students, as religious migrants, bearers of spiritual capital accumulated on its campus and mediators of its Wahhabi-influenced message. It considers their experiences in Medina and their trajectories after graduation. It argues that agency exercised by these students, as well as efforts by an array of religious authorities and lay actors around the world to contest their authority to speak in the name of Islam, have contributed to determining the ways in which the impact of the IUM project has played out in diverse locations. This suggests that, while Saudi religious and political elites may be able to exert religious influence abroad through the IUM, that influence does not necessarily constitute control. Conclusion chapter abstractThis chapter revisits the arguments that run throughout the book and considers their broader implications in regard to debates about Saudi "religious expansion", the evolution of the Wahhabi tradition within the kingdom's borders, and the rise of Salafism in locations around the world in the last decades of the twentieth century.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804798358 20170907
The Islamic University of Medina was established by the Saudi state in 1961 to provide religious instruction primarily to foreign students. Students would come to Medina for religious education and were then expected to act as missionaries, promoting an understanding of Islam in line with the core tenets of Wahhabism. By the early 2000s, more than 11,000 young men from across the globe had graduated from the Islamic University. Circuits of Faith offers the first examination of the Islamic University and considers the efforts undertaken by Saudi actors and institutions to exert religious influence far beyond the kingdom's borders. Michael Farquhar draws on Arabic sources, including biographical materials, memoirs, syllabi, and back issues of the Islamic University journal, as well as interviews with former staff and students, to explore the institution's history and faculty, the content and style of instruction, and the trajectories and experiences of its students. Countering typical assumptions, Farquhar argues that the project undertaken through the Islamic University amounts to something more complex than just the one-way "export" of Wahhabism. Through transnational networks of students and faculty, this Saudi state-funded religious mission also relies upon, and has in turn been influenced by, far-reaching circulations of persons and ideas.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804798358 20170907
Book
vii, 150 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction 1. What is Educational Leadership for Transformation and Social Justice? 2. Jonathan Jansen: The Soft Revolution: Embracing the Better Versions of Ourselves 3. M.G. Sechaba Mahlomaholo: The Question of Fairness: Creating Opportunities to Succeed 4. B.R. Rudi Buys: Something Much Bigger: Doing What is Good and What is Right 5. Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela: Repairing the Brokenness of the Past: Working Through the Unfinished Business of Trauma 6. Andre Keet: There is Nobody Innocent Here: Shared Complicity and the Sharp Edge of Social Justice 7. Lis Lange: Transformation as an Intellectual and Ethical Project: Changing Inherited Patterns of Thought and Social Practice 8. John Samuel: A New Hope: Believing in a Fairer, More Decent, and More Humane Society 9. A Bigger Dream: Visions of Educational Leadership for Transformation and Social Justice in South Africa.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138923539 20170313
Educational Leadership for Transformation and Social Justice examines the relationship between the lived experiences of educational leaders at the University of the Free State in South Africa and how they think about and practice leadership for transformation and social justice. Based on biographical information, public speeches, published writings, and in-depth semi-structured face-to-face interviews, the book presents and analyses seven chapter-length narratives of these leaders. This book explores how some leaders at the University of the Free State - from the vantage point of various racialized and gendered identities, and generational experiences - conceptualize and enact leadership for transformation and social justice. Ambrosio argues that there are certain values, beliefs, concepts, principles, and ways of thinking that cut across their experiences and demographic differences. The narratives are presented in the leaders' own words, and describe how their lived experiences shaped their values and identities, and inform how they think about and practice leadership for transformation and social justice. One convergence that emerged among these leaders is that their leadership is an extension of who they are, of their core values, identities and ethical commitments. Another is that they are motivated by visions of change that go beyond the University; by bigger dreams that infuse their work with meaning and purpose. With its in-depth analysis of the narratives, this book will provide educational leaders who have an orientation towards transformation and social justice with insights that enable them to think differently about how to make the policies, programs, and institutional culture of their own universities more equitable and just. It will appeal to academics, researchers and postgraduate students in the fields of education, educational justice, higher education, educational leadership and change, social justice and racial justice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138923539 20170313
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
ix, 134 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 21 x 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
180, 4 pages ; 19 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
151 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm
East Asia Library
Book
443 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 334 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 187 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
East Asia Library

13. Hong lou jiu ying [2017]

Book
271 pages ; 22 cm
East Asia Library
Book
364 p. ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 792 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
338 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
ix, 286 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm.
  • The hardship years, 1862-1878
  • The learning years, 1878-1891
  • Grahamstown Public School, 1891-1894
  • St Andrew's College, 1894-1904
  • Rhodes University College, academic chemist: 1904-1922
  • Cory in England, 1922
  • Writing history, 1892-1935
  • The legacy of George Edward Cory
  • Genealogical record of the Cory family.
"Cory's unpublished recollections provide a strong foundation which Dr Shell has managed to supplement with substantial additional primary sources in private hands and elsewhere. Much f the interest of the book derives from the human drama of his struggle against adversity from a very early age. Unlike Kipling, however, he seems never to have doubted the values of an Empire which ultimately rewarded him quite richly for his diligence and pluck. Nevertheless, he made a substantial contribution to South African historiography, more especially in the fields of oral history, public history and professional association as Dr Shell records. She never attempts to downplay Cory's racial attitudes or political shortcomings, but rather places them in the correct context which illuminates not only Cory but the context itself. - Professor Jeff Peires."--Back cover.
"George Edward Cory, one of South Africa's pioneer historian was a man of paradoxes. Though abandoned and neglected throughout his childhood, with chutzpah and unceasing hard work he secured a decent schooling for himself and eventually reached his scholarly goal: a place in Cambridge University. His chosen field was science, primarily chemistry. With his degree secured, he sought a position, finding an unexpected opportunity to teach in a school in far-off Grahamstown, South Africa. Assuming the Chair of Chemistry in the newly founded Rhodes University College, he laid the foundations for the study of chemistry, but devoted his spare time to an exploration of the history of his adopted country. This hobby became a consuming passion resulting in his multi-volume The Rise of South Africa. He envisaged the professionalisation of the historian's profession, was a pioneer of oral history and promoted the rôle of the public historian. Gathering documents to preserve them for the use of future scholars, he moved, as retirement loomed, into the role of archivist at national level. Cambridge awarded him a doctorate in 1921 and he was knighted in 1922. This biography follows Cory's paradoxical life, exploring what drove him, what he achieved, the tensions between chemistry and history, his contribution to South African historiography and his enduring legacy, culminating in the founding of the Cory Library for Humanities Research at Rhodes University, Grahamstown. This engrossing story delivers a strong message of the importance of self-belief and self-determination. This protean man trod a path less trodden, as this biography demonstrates in vivid detail. - Professor Christopher Saunders."--Back cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
32 pages in various pagings ; 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
470 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
East Asia Library
Book
391 pages : illustrations (some color), color map ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)