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Book
ix, 295 pages ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The socio-political context of imprisonment in New South Wales
  • Theorising sentencing
  • Experiencing sentencing
  • Managerialism, discipline and the "responsible prisoner"
  • Relational aspects of imprisonment
  • Rehabilitation
  • Conclusion.
This book examines the lives of the sentenced to argue that 'sentencing' should be re-conceived to consider the human perspective. It combines a range of modern criminological and legal theories together with interviews with prisoners in New South Wales, to examine their lives during and beyond completing the terms of imprisonment, for a more continuous and coherent perspective on the process of 'sentencing'. This book makes a strong argument for the practical advantages of listening to the voices of the sentenced and it is therefore a useful tool for the correctional community engaged in providing services and programmes to reduce recidivism. A methodological and well-researched text, this book will be of particular interest to scholars of criminal justice and the penal system, as well as policy makers and practitioners.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319450377 20170731
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvi, 319 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 24 cm
  • Verdict
  • Early years
  • Juries, oaths and witnesses
  • Magistrates, bushrangers and the lash
  • Church and state
  • Sanctuary
  • The big bushwhack
  • Day's diligence
  • Dangar's dilemma
  • Trial
  • An offer refused
  • Retrial
  • Consequences
  • Leave, London and the end of transportation
  • Public education, Sisters of Charity and the incident of the Bible
  • Dichotomous and deathly debates
  • Self-government and a slow decline
  • Legacies
  • A different chalice.
One of the most shocking murder trials in Australia's legal history, and the tribulations of the man who conducted it. In 1838, eleven convicts and former convicts were put on trial for the brutal murder of 28 Aboriginal men, women and children at Myall Creek in New South Wales. The trial created an enormous amount of controversy because it was almost unknown for Europeans to be charged with the murder of Aborigines. It would become the most serious trial of mass murder in Australia's history. The trial's prosecutor was the Attorney General of New South Wales, John Hubert Plunkett. It proved to be Plunkett's greatest test, as it pitted his forensic brilliance and his belief in equality before the law against the combined forces of the free settlers, the squatters, the military, the emancipists, the newspapers, and even the convict population. From the bestselling author of Kidnapped and Eugenia, Murder at Myall Creek follows the journey of the man who arguably achieved more for modern-day civil rights in Australia than anyone else before or since.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvii, 317 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
  • Foreword by the Honourable Keith Mason, AC, QC Acknowledgements List of Illustrations "Dramatis Personae" 1. An "Erratic and Wandering Race" 2. "The Largest Business of Any Man at the Bar" 3. "Active Politics Always Bored Him" 4. Some Lawyers' Laws and Law Reforms 5. Defence - "The Dawn of Australia as a Nation" 6. Taking Silk: Taking Leave: and Taking Stock 7. (Sir) Julian Salomons: the Phantom Chief Justice 8. "A Great Public Duty" 9. "I Never Aspired to the Bench" 10. Industrial Law - or Politics? 11. Crown Land Legislation - "an unitelligible chaos" 12. Diametrical Opposites 13. Representing the Queen 14. "The Return of the Native" Abbreviations Notes Index Table of Cases Schedule of Parliamentary Bills Table of Statutes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781760020569 20170117
J M Bennett's Sir Frederick Darley, the new biography in his acclaimed Lives of the Australian Chief Justices series, describes in fascinating detail one of the most extraordinary episodes in Australian judicial history. In November 1886, the circumstances being unprecedented, New South Wales had three successive Chief Justices. On 4 November Sir James Martin died in office. Attorney-General Want, pressing a false claim to the vacancy, nevertheless declined it. The salary was too low. The great orator W B Dalley, QC, also rejected the position. His health was failing. F M Darley, QC, was immediately approached, but having a large family to support, he also declined. The government turned to Julian Salomons, QC, who accepted and was gazetted. Almost immediately, without taking his seat, he resigned for the extraordinary reasons disclosed in Dr Bennett's fascinating chapter on the "Phantom Chief Justice". A perplexed government urged Darley's reconsideration. He did so reluctantly, serving from 29 November at great financial sacrifice. As the Hon Keith Mason, AC, QC, notes in his insightful foreword, Darley's reluctance to serve was ultimately "matched only by his reluctance to relinquish the role over 20 years later". Richly detailed chapters trace Darley's progression from birth and education in Ireland to Bar practice there at a time when too many lawyers competed for too little work. Darley migrated to Sydney, succeeding beyond his wildest hopes to build a preeminent practice, command a fortune and become a Legislative Councillor. Always regarding Australia as his "adopted country", he retained his "Irishness" to the end. With characteristic care and precision, the author reviews Darley's judicial career, his distinguished presidency over the Supreme Court in difficult years, and his work administering the colony on many occasions as Lieutenant-Governor. Darley might well have retired in 1902 when he accepted a place on the English Royal Commission inquiring into the poor military performance in the Boer War. But despite illness, and resistance to social and industrial change, he persevered on the bench until his death in 1910. The product of meticulous research, Sir Frederick Darley paints an illuminating portrait of the life and times of this important man, whose judicial accomplishments and dedication to duty and service won great acclaim and respect. "As with his earlier lives of Chief Justices, John Bennett has provided us with insights into life and customs as well as fascinating snippets of Darley the husband and paterfamilias. A proud Irishman, he is said to have 'embodied the Victorian era and its values'."The Hon Keith Mason, AC, QC (from the foreword) The NSW State Set of Lives of Australian Chief Justices, which includes, Sir Francis Forbes, Sir James Dowling, Sir Alfred Stephen, Sir James Martin and Sir Frederick Darley is available for $210.00 - to order the NSW State Set, click here.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781760020569 20170117
Law Library (Crown)

4. Weight of evidence [2013]

Book
1 online resource (288 pages) : illustrations
Book
x, 194 p. : ill., ports. ; 22 cm
  • Journal of a voyage
  • Letters from the voyage to Madeira
  • Sketch of the Island of Madeira
  • Letters from Madeira
  • Journal from Madeira to Porto Praya
  • Sketch of Porto Praya in the Island St. Jago
  • Journal : Porto Praya to Rio de Janeiro
  • Journal at Rio
  • Account of the city of St. Sebatian's and the harbour of Rio de Janeiro
  • Letters from Rio
  • Journal from Rio to the cape
  • Letters from the Cape of Good Hope
  • Letters from Sydney.
Front cover image: King Parrot (Alisterus Scapularis), Go-mah (Murry), part of John Hunter, Birds and Flowers of New South Wales drawn on the spot.1788-1790, Rex Nan Kivell CollectionReproduced with permission of National Library of Australia, pic_an 3149631. Ellis Bent was the son of a London merchant trading to the West Indies. He was appointed Judge Advocate to the colony of New South Wales in 1809 and travelled with Governor Macquarie and the 73rd Regiment on board the Dromedary troop ship to the colony. On board ship he kept a journal, wrote sketches of Porto Praya, Madeira and Rio de Janeiro, and was careful to copy all letters he sent to his family. He also wrote from the Cape of Good Hope and from New South Wales until 1811. Ellis Bent has a merchant's eye for detail and these documents give us a remarkable insight into the manners, customs and power play of the early nineteenth century including the customs of sea faring ships.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781876861100 20160612
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 148 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Personal information
  • Access to and amendment of personal information
  • Personal information of third parties
  • Public officials.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xliv, 895 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 92 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Institutional models
  • Factors affecting the relationship between the Offices of Information and Privacy Commissioners
  • A model for NSW
  • Consequential amendments
  • A separated model.
Law Library (Crown)

9. Privacy principles [2009]

Book
xxxiv, 302 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • UPP 1 : anonymity and pseudoanonimity
  • UPP 2 : collection
  • UPP 3 : notification
  • UPP 4 : openness
  • UPP 5 : use and disclosure
  • UPP 6 : direct marketing
  • UPP 7 : data quality
  • UPP 8 : data security
  • UPP 9 : access and correction
  • UPP 10 : identifiers
  • UPP 11 : cross-border data flows.
Law Library (Crown)

10. Workplace deaths [2009]

Book
x, 82 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Workplace death offences in OHS law and general criminal law
  • The development of a workplace deaths offence
  • Part 2A of the OHS Act
  • Prosecution under criminal law
  • Appendix: The law in other jurisdictions.
Law Library (Crown)

11. Invasion of privacy [2007]

Book
xii, 238 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 74 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxvi, 304 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 222 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
lxxxii, 1035 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 120 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 80 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxvi, 226 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 32 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 265 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)