Book
73 pages ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
vi, 62 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 120 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 246 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Prospects and pitfalls of participation
  • Ugandan history and the constitution-making process
  • Changing attitudes
  • Creating informed distrusting democrats
  • Constructing constitutional support
  • Participation, constitution making, and democracy.
Does participation lead citizens of new democracies to invest or disinvest in democracy? How does mass participation affect political culture in countries undergoing political transition? "Distrusting Democrats" examines the consequences of citizen involvement in Uganda, one of a growing number of countries employing the participatory model of constitutional reform. Contrary to predictions, author Devra Moehler finds that participation contributes to the creation of "distrusting democrats": citizens who are democratic in their attitudes, but suspicious of their governmental institutions in practice. Moehler argues that participation in developing democracies gives citizens new tools with which to evaluate their imperfectly-performing institutions. Participation raises democratic expectations and alerts citizens to existing democratic deficits. The general implications for constitution-building countries are clear: short-term risks of disillusionment and instability; and long-term advantages from a more sophisticated citizenry capable of monitoring leaders and promoting political development. Moehler's analysis is based on in-depth interviews, archival research, and a national random-sample survey of 820 Ugandan citizens.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472099931 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 246 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Prospects and pitfalls of participation
  • Ugandan history and the constitution-making process
  • Changing attitudes
  • Creating informed distrusting democrats
  • Constructing constitutional support
  • Participation, constitution making, and democracy.
Does participation lead citizens of new democracies to invest or disinvest in democracy? How does mass participation affect political culture in countries undergoing political transition? "Distrusting Democrats" examines the consequences of citizen involvement in Uganda, one of a growing number of countries employing the participatory model of constitutional reform. Contrary to predictions, author Devra Moehler finds that participation contributes to the creation of "distrusting democrats": citizens who are democratic in their attitudes, but suspicious of their governmental institutions in practice. Moehler argues that participation in developing democracies gives citizens new tools with which to evaluate their imperfectly-performing institutions. Participation raises democratic expectations and alerts citizens to existing democratic deficits. The general implications for constitution-building countries are clear: short-term risks of disillusionment and instability; and long-term advantages from a more sophisticated citizenry capable of monitoring leaders and promoting political development. Moehler's analysis is based on in-depth interviews, archival research, and a national random-sample survey of 820 Ugandan citizens.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472099931 20160528
Green Library
Book
262 p.
Green Library
Book
58 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
96 p. ; 29 cm.
Green Library
Book
iii, 929 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
iv, 226 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
v. <1> ; 27 cm.
Green Library
Book
71 p. ; 14 cm.
Green Library
Book
vi, 132 p. ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
vii, 44 p. ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
viii, 42 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xx, 300 p. ; 15 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
90 p. ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
p. 15-41 ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
lix, 210 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 25 cm.
Green Library