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Book
xvi, 234 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • From genocide to Gacaca
  • Learning "to be Kinyarwanda"
  • Gacaca mechanics
  • The weight of the state
  • Navigating the social
  • A thousand hills, a thousand Gacacas
  • Shades of heart.
After the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, victims, perpetrators, and the country as a whole struggled to deal with the legacy of the mass violence. The government responded by creating a new version of a traditional grassroots justice system called gacaca. Bert Ingelaere, based on his observation of two thousand gacaca trials, offers a comprehensive assessment of what these courts set out to do, how they worked, what they achieved, what they did not achieve, and how they affected Rwandan society. Weaving together vivid firsthand recollections, interviews, and trial testimony with systematic analysis, Ingelaere documents how the gacaca shifted over time from confession to accusation, from restoration to retribution. He precisely articulates the importance of popular conceptions of what is true and just. Marked by methodological sophistication, extraordinary evidence, and deep knowledge of Rwanda, this is an authoritative, nuanced, and bittersweet account of one of the most important experiments in transitional justice after mass violence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780299309701 20170313
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvi, 234 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • From genocide to Gacaca
  • Learning "to be kinyarwanda"
  • Gacaca mechanics
  • Experiencing Gacaca
  • The weight of the state
  • Navigating the social
  • A thousand hills, a thousand Gacacas
  • Shades of heart.
After the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, victims, perpetrators, and the country as a whole struggled to deal with the legacy of the mass violence. The government responded by creating a new version of a traditional grassroots justice system called gacaca. Bert Ingelaere, based on his observation of two thousand gacaca trials, offers a comprehensive assessment of what these courts set out to do, how they worked, what they achieved, what they did not achieve, and how they affected Rwandan society. Weaving together vivid firsthand recollections, interviews, and trial testimony with systematic analysis, Ingelaere documents how the gacaca shifted over time from confession to accusation, from restoration to retribution. He precisely articulates the importance of popular conceptions of what is true and just. Marked by methodological sophistication, extraordinary evidence, and deep knowledge of Rwanda, this is an authoritative, nuanced, and bittersweet account of one of the most important experiments in transitional justice after mass violence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780299309701 20170123
Green Library
Book
xvi, 367 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • A history of clientelism in Rwanda
  • The RPF : an unrivaled patron
  • The mental map : shared expectations of rule
  • The gacaca court : deciding innocence and guilt
  • Confessions : surrendering the right to rule
  • Denunciations : local space and local control
  • Judges : political co-optation at the grassroots.
This book shows how Rwanda's transitional courts that tried genocide crimes - the gacaca - produced social complicity and cemented authoritarian rule. It is unique for its in-depth investigation of the courts' legal operations: confessions, denunciation, and lay judging, and shows how targeted incentives such as grants of clemency, opportunities for private gain, and career advancement drew the masses into the orbit of the ethnic minority-dominated regime. Using previously untapped data, it illustrates how a decade of mass trials constructed a tacit patronage-driven relationship in which the interests of the citizenry became tied to the authoritarian elite that had discretionary power to grant or withdraw those benefits at will. The operation of law in individual behavior and authoritarian control presented in this volume will be of use to students and scholars in the social sciences, and practitioners interested in criminal law and transitional justice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107084087 20160619
Law Library (Crown)
Book
283 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Harmony legal models and the architecture of social repair
  • Silencing the past : producing history and the politics of memory
  • Escaping dichotomies : grassroots law in historical and global context
  • Gacaca days and genocide citizenship
  • Comite y'Abrunzi : politics and poetics for the ordinary
  • The legal aid clinic : mediation as thick description
  • Improvising authority : lay judges as intermediaries
  • Conclusion: Legal architectures of social repair.
Kristin Conner Doughty examines how Rwandans navigated the combination of harmony and punishment in grassroots courts purportedly designed to rebuild the social fabric in the wake of the 1994 genocide. Postgenocide Rwandan officials developed new local courts ostensibly modeled on traditional practices of dispute resolution as part of a broader national policy of unity and reconciliation. The three legal forums at the heart of Remediation in Rwanda-genocide courts called inkiko gacaca, mediation committees called comite y'abunzi, and a legal aid clinic-all emphasized mediation based on principles of compromise and unity, brokered by third parties with the authority to administer punishment. Doughty demonstrates how exhortations to unity in legal forums served as a form of cultural control, even as people rebuilt moral community and conceived alternative futures through debates there. Investigating a broad range of disputes, she connects the grave disputes about genocide to the ordinary frictions people endured living in its aftermath. Remediation in Rwanda is therefore about not only national reconstruction but also a broader narrative of how the embrace of law, particularly in postconflict contexts, influences people's lives. Though law-based mediation is framed as benign-and is often justified as a purer form of culturally rooted dispute resolution, both by national governments such as Rwanda's, and in the transitional justice movement more broadly-its implementation, as Doughty reveals, involves coercion and accompanying resistance. Yet in grassroots legal forums that are deeply contextualized, law-based mediation can open up spaces in which people negotiate the micropolitics of reconciliation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812247831 20161128
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 224 pages ; 25 cm
  • The Rwandan social context
  • Inside the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
  • Inside the Rwandan national courts
  • Inside the Gacaca courts
  • Legitimating transitional justice in Rwanda.
The rise of international criminal trials has been accompanied by a call for domestic responses to extraordinary violence. Yet there is remarkably limited research on the interactions among local, national, and international transitional justice institutions. Rwanda offers an early example of multi-level courts operating in concert, through the concurrent practice of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), the national Rwandan courts, and the gacaca community courts. Courts in Conflict makes a crucial and timely contribution to the examination of these pluralist responses to atrocity at a juncture when holistic approaches are rapidly becoming the policy norm. Although Rwanda's post-genocide criminal courts are compatible in law, an interpretive cultural analysis shows how and why they have often conflicted in practice. The author's research is derived from 182 interviews with judges, lawyers, and a group of witnesses and suspects within all three of the post-genocide courts. This rich empirical material shows that the judges and lawyers inside each of the courts offer notably different interpretations of Rwanda's transitional justice processes, illuminating divergent legal cultures that help explain the constraints on the courts' effective cooperation and evidence gathering. The potential for similar competition between domestic and international justice processes is apparent in the current practice of the International Criminal Court (ICC). However, this competition can be mitigated through increased communication among the different sites of justice, fostering legal cultures of complementarity that can more effectively respond to the needs of affected populations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199398195 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 224 pages : illustration ; 25 cm
  • Introduction. Toward an interpretive approach to transitional justice
  • Interpretation, empirical research, and the role of theory
  • Limitations on the research
  • The Rwandan social context
  • Inside the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
  • Inside the Rwandan national courts
  • Inside the Gacaca courts
  • Legitimating transitional justice in Rwanda
  • Conclusion.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 224 pages : map ; 25 cm
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- MAP OF RWANDA -- INTRODUCTION -- ABBREVIATIONS -- CHAPTER 1 - The Rwandan Social Context -- CHAPTER 2 - Inside the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda -- CHAPTER 3 - Inside the Rwandan National Courts -- CHAPTER 4 - Inside the Gacaca Courts -- CHAPTER 5 - Legitimating Transitional Justice in Rwanda -- CHAPTER 6 - Conclusion -- APPENDIX -- GLOSSARY -- BIBLIOGRAPHY -- TABLE OF CASES -- TABLE OF STATUTES -- INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199398195 20160618
The rise of international criminal trials has been accompanied by a call for domestic responses to extraordinary violence. Yet there is remarkably limited research on the interactions among local, national, and international transitional justice institutions. Rwanda offers an early example of multi-level courts operating in concert, through the concurrent practice of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), the national Rwandan courts, and the gacaca community courts. Courts in Conflict makes a crucial and timely contribution to the examination of these pluralist responses to atrocity at a juncture when holistic approaches are rapidly becoming the policy norm. Although Rwanda's post-genocide criminal courts are compatible in law, an interpretive cultural analysis shows how and why they have often conflicted in practice. The author's research is derived from 182 interviews with judges, lawyers, and a group of witnesses and suspects within all three of the post-genocide courts. This rich empirical material shows that the judges and lawyers inside each of the courts offer notably different interpretations of Rwanda's transitional justice processes, illuminating divergent legal cultures that help explain the constraints on the courts' effective cooperation and evidence gathering. The potential for similar competition between domestic and international justice processes is apparent in the current practice of the International Criminal Court (ICC). However, this competition can be mitigated through increased communication among the different sites of justice, fostering legal cultures of complementarity that can more effectively respond to the needs of affected populations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199398195 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-5033-01
Book
175 p. ; 24 cm
  • Introduction 1. History of the crisis 2. The ignorant bystander? 3. The indifferent bystander? 4. The bystander who did too little, too late? 5. The responsible bystander? Selected bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780719095238 20160618
The ignorant bystander: Britain and the Rwandan genocide uses a case study of Britain's response to the genocide to explore what factors motivate humanitarian intervention in overseas crises. The Rwandan genocide was one of the bloodiest events in the late twentieth century and the international community's response has stimulated a great deal of interest and debate ever since. In this study, Dean White provides the most thorough review of Britain's response to the crisis written to date. The research draws on previously unseen documents and interviews with ministers and senior diplomats, and examines issues such as how the decision to intervene was made by the British Government, how media coverage led to a significant misunderstanding of the crisis, and how Britain shaped debate at the UN Security Council. The book concludes by comparing the response to Rwanda, to Britain's response to the recent crises in Syria and Libya.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780719095238 20160618
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (390 pages) : digital, PDF file(s).
  • Introduction-- Part I. Clientelist and Authoritarian Legacies: 1. A history of clientelism in Rwanda-- 2. The RPF: an unrivaled patron-- Part II. Formal and Informal Rules of the Game: 3. The mental map: shared expectations of rule-- 4. The gacaca court: deciding innocence and guilt-- Part III. Consolidating Authoritarianism: 5. Confessions: surrendering the right to rule-- 6. Denunciations: local space and local control-- 7. Judges: political cooptation at the grassroots-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107084087 20160619
This book shows how Rwanda's transitional courts that tried genocide crimes - the gacaca - produced social complicity and cemented authoritarian rule. It is unique for its in-depth investigation of the courts' legal operations: confessions, denunciation, and lay judging, and shows how targeted incentives such as grants of clemency, opportunities for private gain, and career advancement drew the masses into the orbit of the ethnic minority-dominated regime. Using previously untapped data, it illustrates how a decade of mass trials constructed a tacit patronage-driven relationship in which the interests of the citizenry became tied to the authoritarian elite that had discretionary power to grant or withdraw those benefits at will. The operation of law in individual behavior and authoritarian control presented in this volume will be of use to students and scholars in the social sciences, and practitioners interested in criminal law and transitional justice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107084087 20160619
Book
x, 153 : 1 map ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxiv, 115 pages ; 24 cm
"The Rwandan justice system know as Gacaca, originally preserved by word of mouth was revived, documented, tested and used successfully to handle millions of legal cases in the aftermath of the Rwandan genocide against the Tutsi. This monograph begins by depicting the general picture of customary law and ponders on the practical challenges in the production of the modern Gacaca law in three versions: Kinyarwanda, French and English. The author demonstrates that translation involves language use and transfer, as well as communication within a cultural setting. The book amply demonstrates that linguistic, textual, contextual and cultural cues in translation should not be downplayed. It also shows that the cultural turn in translation has transformed and re-conceptualised the translation theory to integrate non-western thought about translation discipline since time immemorial. A major theme within the book is that translation as a mediating form between cultures and contexts should not overlook cultural differences because language is a marker of identity"--Back cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
135 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Chapter 1 The management of public finances in rwanda -- Rwanda Legal framework of public finances -- Constitution -- Organic budget law -- Annual budget laws -- Institutional framework of public finances -- The Ministry of finance -- The Parliament -- Office of Auditor General of State Finances -- Budget planning, execution and control in Rwanda -- Compliance with budgetary principles -- Budget planning and preparation -- Budget execution -- Government oversight arrangements -- Government banking arrangements -- Chapter two: the rwandan tax law -- Historical background of taxation in Rwanda -- Main principles governing tax in Rwanda -- Constitutional principles -- The principle of legality of tax -- The principle of equality before tax -- The principle of liberty -- Non-constitutional principles -- The principle of non-retroactivity -- The principle of territoriality -- Rwandan tax structure -- Centralized taxes -- Value Added Tax (VAT) -- Historical background -- VAT Registration -- VAT taxable activities -- VAT standard rate and time for payment -- Zero rate VAT and exonerations -- Direct taxes on income -- Personal income tax -- Business profits -- Investment income -- Corporate Income Tax -- Withholding taxes -- Pay as You Earn (PAYE) tax -- Withholding Tax on Imports and public Tenders -- Withholding Tax on other payments -- Property tax: 4th base: boats -- Registration fees for vehicles -- Consumption taxes (Excise Taxes) -- Import Duties -- Decentralized taxes -- Property tax -- 1st base: Registered occupied houses -- 2nd base: Area of unbuilt plots -- 6th base: Mineral concessions -- Tax on rental revenues -- Trading Licence Tax -- Tax incentives under Rwandan law -- Profit tax discount -- Investment allowance -- Research and development tax incentives -- Tax holidays -- Tax incentives in Special Economic Zones -- Tax procedure and tax litigation in Rwanda -- The taxpayers' duties -- Filing tax returns -- Rectification -- Audit and investigations -- Entrance to premises without notice -- Estimated assessment procedure -- Extending the deadline for filing tax returns -- Paying the due tax -- Possibility of paying taxes in instalments -- Waive of tax liability, interest and penalties -- Prescription -- Other duties of taxpayer -- Duty to register -- Duty to register for VAT -- Duty to use prescribed VAT invoice -- Fiscal litigation: Settlement of fiscal disputes -- The procedure for centralised taxes -- Administrative appeal -- Judicial appeal -- The procedure for decentralised taxes -- Administrative appeal -- Judicial appeal -- Evidences in tax law -- The burden of proof -- Types of evidences -- Ordinary evidences -- Signs and indications of prosperity -- Affidavits -- Fiscal sanctions -- Sanctions applicable to centralised taxes -- Sanctions imposed by tax administration -- Sanctions imposed by the courts -- Sanctions applicable to decentralised taxes -- Forced recovery -- The procedure for centralised taxes -- Warning
  • Seizure and auction of taxpayer's property -- Notification to third parties -- The procedure for descentralised taxes -- Warning -- Seizure and auction of taxpayer's property -- Notification to third parties -- International aspects of Rwanda tax system -- Permanent establishment under Rwandan law -- Taxation of electronic commerce in Rwanda -- EAC regional integration and impact on taxes.
"Tax law and public finance in Rwanda presents the state of play of public finances and tax laws in Rwanda. It sumarises the regulation of public ressources and public expednitures before presenting an overview of tax regulation in Rwanda, as one of the major source of income for the States worldwide. This book therefore provides the basic information relating to law governing the two connected domains of law in Rwanda.

"Me Pie Habimana, holds a Master's degree (LL.M) in Business Law and a Post-Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice. He is currently enrolled in PhD program researching on International Tax Law and Foreign Direct Investment in Rwanda. Me Pie Habimana is a lecturer of law at University of Rwanda, College of Arts and Social Sciences, School of Law and teaches Tax Law, Law of Public Finance and Law of Enterprise. He is also a visiting lecturer of Tax Law at Kigali Independent University and a Tramer of Commercial Transactions at lnstitute of Legal Practice and Development - Postgraduate program. As member of Rwanda Bar Association, M'' Pie Hobimana is currently a Managing Partner of Amicus Law Chambers, a seasoned law firm situated in Kigali. His research interest focuses on tax law, business transactions and legal practices."--P. [4] of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
298 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Historical background to the internecine conflict in Rwanda
  • The legacy of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
  • Prosecution of genocide in national courts
  • The traditional Gacaca court system
  • A critical analysis of the relationship between the ICTR, national courts and Gacaca courts.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 271 p. ; 24 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION 1.1 Introduction 1.2 The Research Problem and Research Questions 1.3 Research Objectives and the Study Method 1.4 Research Originality 1.5 Definition of Key Terms 1.5.1 Genocide 1.5.2 Genocidal Gender and Sexual Violence 1.5.3 Crimes Against Humanity 1.5.4 Serious Violations of Article 3 Common to the Geneva Conventions and of Additional Protocol II 2 FRAMEWORK AND OVERVIEW 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Historical Overview 2.2.1 Ethnicity Debates on Rwanda 2.2.2 Rwandan History 2.2.2.1 An Overview 2.2.2.2 Hutu-Tutsi: the Social Class Narrative 2.2.2.3 Colonisation: the Invention of Ethnicity 2.2.2.4 Ethnicity in the First and Second Republics 2.2.2.5 Ethnicity in Rwandan Laws 2.2.2.6 Concluding Remarks 2.3 Introduction to Theory 2.3.1 Overview of Applicable Feminist Theory 2.3.2 Introducing Feminist Debates on Genocidal Rape 2.4 Introduction to Post-Genocide Legal Responses 2.4.1 The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda 2.4.1.1 The Establishment of the ICTR 2.4.1.2 The Structure of the Tribunal 2.4.1.3 The Jurisdiction of the ICTR 2.4.1.4 ICTR Rules of Procedure and Evidence Relating to Gender and Sexual Violence 2.4.2 Rwanda's Ordinary Courts 2.4.2.1 The Quest for a Judicial Response 2.4.2.2 The Normative Framework 2.4.2.3 Structure and Functioning of Specialised Chambers 2.4.2.4 Categorisation 2.4.2.5 Confession and Guilty Plea 2.4.3 Gacaca Courts 2.4.3.1 The Establishment of Gacaca Courts 2.4.3.2 Objectives of Gacaca Courts 2.4.3.3 Structure and Jurisdiction 3 THE RWANDAN EXPERIENCE: A COMPLEX REALITY 3.1 Gendered Genocidal Discourse: A Precursor to Genocide 3.2 The Scope and Nature of Gender and Sexual Violence 3.3 The Complex Reality as Seen from the Training 3.3.1 Introduction, Context and Method of the Training 3.3.2 Sharing Genocidal Experiences of Victims 3.3.3 The Dilemmas: Reflections and Impressions 3.3.3.1 The Complex Reality and Challenges on the Legal Platform 3.3.3.2 Theoretical Challenges 4 FEMINIST THEORY 4.1 General Overview of Feminist Theories 4.1.1 Liberal Feminists 4.1.2 Radical Feminists 4.1.3 Cultural Feminists 4.2 A Feminist's General View on Gender and Sexual Violence 4.3 Overview of African Feminism 4.4 African Feminism and Gender and Sexual Violence 4.5 Gender and Sexual Violence in War and Genocide: A Feminist Debate 4.6 Concluding Remarks 5 THE LEGACY OF THE ICTR 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Prosecutor v. Jean Paul Akayesu 5.2.1 Background 5.2.2 The Amended Indictment 5.2.3 The Akayesu Trial and Judgment 5.2.3.1 Findings on Rape and Sexual Violence 5.2.3.2 Discussion and Ruling on Genocidal Gender and Sexual Violence 5.2.3.3 Ruling on Rape and Sexual Violence as Crimes against Humanity 5.2.4 Analysis of the Akayesu Case 5.3 The Prosecutor v. Muhimana 5.3.1 Background 5.3.2 The Muhimana Indictment 5.3.3 Factual and Legal Findings 5.3.4 Muhimana Case Analysis and Comment 5.3.5 Muhimana Concluding Remarks 5.4 The Prosecutor v. Nyiramasuhuko et al. 5.4.1 Background 5.4.2 The Amended Indictment and the Alleged Facts 5.4.3 Factual and Legal findings 5.4.4 The Court's Opinion on Rape as Genocide 5.4.5 Analysis of the Nyiramasuhuko Case 5.4.5.1 Defective Indictment for Genocidal Gender Rape and Sexual Violence 5.4.5.2 Female Perpetrators 5.4.5.3 Gender Discourse in Nyiramasuhuko's Defence 5.4.5.4 Complexity of Testifying: Witness TA's Experience 5.4.6 Final and Concluding Remarks 5.4.6.1 Legacy on Gender and Sexual Violence against Tutsi Men and Boys 5.4.6.2 Remarks on the Defect in not Charging Genocidal Gender and Sexual Violence 5.4.6.3 Final Concluding Remarks for Chapter 5 6 THE LEGACY OF THE ORDINARY COURTS IN RWANDA 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Gender and Sexual Violence in the Legislative Narrative 6.2.1 Rape in the Government's Draft Organic Law 6.2.2 Parliamentary Discourse: Rape vs. Sexual Torture 6.3 Prosecuting Rape and Sexual Torture 1996-2008 6.3.1 Introductory Remarks 6.3.2 The Legacy of the Ordinary Courts 6.4 Guilty Pleas and their Impact on Rape and Sexual Torture 6.5 Conclusion 7 THE LEGACY OF THE GACACA COURTS 7.1 Gacaca Justice and Gender and Sexual Violence Crimes 2001-2007 7.1.1 Introduction 7.2 The Functioning of the Gacaca Courts: Their Impact on Victims of Gender Violence 7.2.1 Information Gathering 7.2.2 Confessions and a Guilty Plea 7.3 Gacaca Trials 7.3.1 Why the Gacaca Courts Became Competent to Try Rape and Sexual Torture 7.3.2 Introduction to Amendment 13/2008 7.3.3 Parliamentary Discussions on Amendment 13/2008 7.3.4 Organic Law No. 13/2008 and Regulation No. 16/2008 7.3.5 The Gacaca Courts' Adjudication of Rape and Sexual Trials 7.3.6 Conclusion 8 SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS 8.1 Summary 8.2 Recommendations Samenvatting (Summary in Dutch) Bibliography Table of Cases Curriculum Vitae.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780682105 20160613
Genocidal Gender and Sexual Violence tackles an important and highly topical issue. The author examines how the experiences of victims of genocidal gender and sexual violence have been addressed on a theoretical and practical level. This study investigates the contribution of feminist legal theories in naming and addressing gender and sexual violence. It questions the legacy of the ICTR and Rwanda's domestic judicial initiatives from the perspective of the complex realities of victims' experiences. The research central focus is the question whether the genocidal character of gender and sexual violence in the case of Rwanda has been theorised and judged as such. The author's training for Inyangamugayo - gacaca judges - contributes to a wider understanding of the complexity of victims' experiences. This complex reality is further elaborated on and explored practically through an analysis of the legacy of post-genocide judicial mechanisms for Rwanda in naming and condemning genocidal gender and sexual violence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780682105 20160613
Green Library
Book
xiii, 271 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Framework and overview
  • The Rwandan experience : a complex reality
  • Feminist theory
  • The legacy of the ICTR
  • The legacy of the ordinary courts in Rwanda
  • The legacy of the gacaca courts
  • Summary and recommendations.
Genocidal Gender and Sexual Violence tackles an important and highly topical issue. The author examines how the experiences of victims of genocidal gender and sexual violence have been addressed on a theoretical and practical level. This study investigates the contribution of feminist legal theories in naming and addressing gender and sexual violence. It questions the legacy of the ICTR and Rwanda's domestic judicial initiatives from the perspective of the complex realities of victims' experiences. The research central focus is the question whether the genocidal character of gender and sexual violence in the case of Rwanda has been theorised and judged as such. The author's training for Inyangamugayo - gacaca judges - contributes to a wider understanding of the complexity of victims' experiences. This complex reality is further elaborated on and explored practically through an analysis of the legacy of post-genocide judicial mechanisms for Rwanda in naming and condemning genocidal gender and sexual violence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780682105 20160613
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 146 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1: An Introduction-- Chapter 2: Global Elite Bystanders, Genocide Complicity-- Chapter 3: Reading the Histories of Rwanda-- Chapter 4: The Specter of Genocide in Rwanda and its Aftermath: Internal and External Responsibility for Genocide-- Chapter 5: The French 'Resolution'-- Chapter 6: Britain, Uganda and the RPF-- Chapter 7: How Britain responded-- Chapter 8: A conclusion-- Notes-- References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415619608 20160610
Britain's Hidden Role in the Rwandan Genocide examines the role of the United Kingdom as a global elite bystander to the crime of genocide, and its complicity, in violation of international criminal laws during the Rwandan genocide of 1994. As prevailing accounts confine themselves to the role and actions of the United States and the United Nations, the full picture of Rwanda's genocide has yet to be revealed. Hazel Cameron demonstrates that it is the unravelling of the criminal role and actions of the British that illuminates a more detailed answer to the question of 'why' the genocide in Rwanda occurred. In this book, she provides a systematic and detailed analysis of the policies of the British Government towards civil unrest in Rwanda throughout the 1990s that culminated in genocide. Utilising documentary evidence obtained as a result of Freedom of Information requests to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, as well as material obtained through extensive interviews - with British government cabinet members, diplomats, Ambassadors to the United Nations Security Council, prisoners in Rwanda convicted of being leaders and organisers of genocide, and victims and survivors of genocide in Rwanda - the author finds that the actions of the British and French governments, both before and during the Rwandan genocide of 1994, were disassociated from human rights norms. It is suggested herein that the decision-making of the Major government during the period of 1990 - 1994 was for the advancement of the interrelated goals of maintaining power status and ensuring economic interests in key areas of Africa. This account of the legal culpability of the powerful within the corridors of government, in both London and Paris, shows that these behaviours cannot be conceptualised under existing notions of state crime. This book serves to illuminate the inadequacies and limitations of a concept of state crime in international law as it currently stands, and will be of considerable interest to anyone concerned with the misuse of state power.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415619608 20160610
Green Library
Book
146 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1: An Introduction-- Chapter 2: Global Elite Bystanders, Genocide Complicity-- Chapter 3: Reading the Histories of Rwanda-- Chapter 4: The Specter of Genocide in Rwanda and its Aftermath: Internal and External Responsibility for Genocide-- Chapter 5: The French 'Resolution'-- Chapter 6: Britain, Uganda and the RPF-- Chapter 7: How Britain responded-- Chapter 8: A conclusion-- Notes-- References.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415619608 20160610
Britain's Hidden Role in the Rwandan Genocide examines the role of the United Kingdom as a global elite bystander to the crime of genocide, and its complicity, in violation of international criminal laws during the Rwandan genocide of 1994. As prevailing accounts confine themselves to the role and actions of the United States and the United Nations, the full picture of Rwanda's genocide has yet to be revealed. Hazel Cameron demonstrates that it is the unravelling of the criminal role and actions of the British that illuminates a more detailed answer to the question of 'why' the genocide in Rwanda occurred. In this book, she provides a systematic and detailed analysis of the policies of the British Government towards civil unrest in Rwanda throughout the 1990s that culminated in genocide. Utilising documentary evidence obtained as a result of Freedom of Information requests to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, as well as material obtained through extensive interviews - with British government cabinet members, diplomats, Ambassadors to the United Nations Security Council, prisoners in Rwanda convicted of being leaders and organisers of genocide, and victims and survivors of genocide in Rwanda - the author finds that the actions of the British and French governments, both before and during the Rwandan genocide of 1994, were disassociated from human rights norms. It is suggested herein that the decision-making of the Major government during the period of 1990 - 1994 was for the advancement of the interrelated goals of maintaining power status and ensuring economic interests in key areas of Africa. This account of the legal culpability of the powerful within the corridors of government, in both London and Paris, shows that these behaviours cannot be conceptualised under existing notions of state crime. This book serves to illuminate the inadequacies and limitations of a concept of state crime in international law as it currently stands, and will be of considerable interest to anyone concerned with the misuse of state power.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415619608 20160610
Law Library (Crown)
Book
27 pages : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Green Library
Book
xi, 95 pages ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
154 pages
SAL3 (off-campus storage)