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Book
367 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
530 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
639 pages ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
385 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 279 pages ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Extraordinary tribunals in modern Egypt : a genealogy
  • Whitewashing a coup
  • The revolution's court
  • Who was responsible for the 1948 debacle?
  • Rhetoric and historical polemics
  • The advent of the people's court
  • Officers-brothers relations : what went wrong?
  • The trial of the Murshid
  • Trapped between two revolutions
  • Appendix I: Decree on the crime of treason : law no. 344 of 1952
  • Appendix II: Decree on the establishment of the revolution's court
  • Appendix III: Decree on the establishment of the people's court.
Revolutionary Justice narrates the power struggle between the Free Officers and their adversaries in the aftermath of Egypt's July Revolution of 1952 by studying trials held at the Revolution's Court and the People's Court. The establishment of these tribunals coincided with the most serious political crisis between the new regime and the opposition-primarily the Muslim Brothers and the Wafd party, but also senior officials in the previous government. By this point, the initial euphoria and the unbridled adoration for the Free Officers had worn off, and the focus of the public debate shifted to the legitimacy of the army's continued rule. Yoram Meital charts the crucial events of Egyptian Revolution both within and outside the courtroom. The tribunals' transcripts, which constitute the prime source of his study, offer a rare glimpse of the dialogue between parties that held conflicting views. While "show trials" against political dissidents are generally considered of little historical value, Revolutionary Justice lucidly shows that the rhetoric generated by Egypt's special courts played a crucial role in the denouement of political struggles, the creation of new historical trends, and the shaping of both the regime and the opposition's public image. The deliberations at the courtroom reinforced the prevailing emergency atmosphere, helping the junta advance its plans for a new dispensation. On the other hand, the responses of defendants and witnesses during the trial exposed weaknesses in the official hegemonic narrative. Paradoxically, oppositional views that the regime tirelessly endeavored to silence were tolerated and recorded in the courtroom.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190600839 20161228
Law Library (Crown)
Book
337 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Initial interest and previous mentions of the case
  • Reorientation
  • Law and sharia in contemporary Egypt
  • Contextualization
  • Media and mediatization
  • (Inter-)discourse theory
  • Synopsis and sources
  • Prologue
  • Special discourse-the legal story of Hind and Ahṃad
  • Draft complaint
  • Theoretical perspectives on Egyptian law
  • The historical emergence of a special discursive formation
  • The apparatuses and special discourses of Egyptian law
  • The black letter part of the special discourse of law
  • The reflective part of the special discourse of law
  • The relation of qānūn and fiqh in personal status law
  • A digression on shariatic references-
  • The concept of marriage
  • The marital regime
  • The documentation of marriage
  • The concept of lineage
  • Legal questions
  • The classification of sexual relations
  • The rules of evidence
  • The verdict
  • Interdiscourse-the public story of Ahṃad and Hind
  • Theory
  • A contradistinction of source types
  • Jürgen Link's model of interdiscourse
  • Narrative patterns
  • Drama
  • Act : Truth
  • Act : the discussions
  • Act : the contestation
  • Act : the campaign
  • Scandal
  • Scandals and mediatization
  • A mediated scandal in Egypt
  • Phase 1. latency
  • Cause
  • Phase 2. ascent
  • -Sequential problems-
  • Phase 2. ascent (continued)
  • Phase 3. consolidation
  • Climax
  • Phase 4. Fall
  • Phase 5. rehabilitation
  • Comments on dramatic presentation and the analysis as a scandal
  • Mediated scandals and interdiscourse
  • Discourse Analysis-perspectives on legal change and development
  • The case of zayna and Ahṃad 'Izz (Egypt, 2015)
  • Discursive events
  • Legal development and the special discourses of modern law and fiqh
  • Legislative changes
  • The law no. 1 of the year 2000
  • The law proposals of 2006
  • Interpretational development
  • Official fatwas
  • Judicial precedent
  • Judicial discretion
  • Expert debates and discussions
  • Legal development and interdiscourse
  • The scandal as an interdiscursive event
  • General mechanisms of interdiscursive depiction
  • Accuracy and inaccuracy
  • Inclusiveness
  • Repetition and emphasis
  • Inconsistencies and conflations
  • Discourse positions and collective symbols
  • Debate structures in Egypt
  • The interdiscursive event
  • Standpoints and stances on lineage and genetic testing
  • The religious conservative standpoint
  • The liberal progressive standpoint
  • Continued : the religious conservative standpoint
  • The hegemonial standpoint
  • Shifting discourse positions
  • Conclusion
  • An interdiscursive model of of legal development
  • Additional event types and the Arab Spring
  • Additional event types and elementary discourse
  • The dynamics of legal development
  • The relevance of interdiscursive events for legal development
  • The relevance of the scandal
  • The general relevance of interdiscursive events
  • Summary
  • Bibliography
  • Laws and legal texts
  • Newspaper articles and other journalistic sources
  • Other publications.
Green Library
Book
324 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 222 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Essential background
  • Privacy and confidentiality in Egyptian arbitration : law and practice
  • Privacy and confidentiality in the judicial system
  • Confidentiality and privacy in the Egyptian legal system.
This book addresses the issue of privacy and confidentiality in the broader context of the Egyptian legal system. The volume opens with an overview of the major approaches to confidentiality adopted in various jurisdictions. It goes on to examine the duties of confidentiality and privacy in arbitration law and practice on the basis of interviews with 30 law professors and practitioners who often act as arbitrators or counsel for parties in arbitral disputes together with the relevant Egyptian arbitration law provisions. The book takes into account the relevant provisions in the arbitration laws of Syria, Saudia Arabia and Yemen. It moves on to explore the relation between arbitration and the judicial system, and the extent to which the former should borrow its rules from the latter with regard to publicity and the rule of public trial. Finally, this book looks at the right to privacy as (a) a constitutional right, as a potential basis for a legal duty of confidentiality in arbitration, and the duties stemming from this constitutional right in the various laws of Egypt, as well as (b) the constraints imposed on the right to privacy, in particular those stemming from the constitutional principles of freedom of speech and freedom of the press. The main conclusion is that confidentiality does indeed exist in arbitration. However, its legal basis is not the law on arbitration or the arbitration agreement. It is in fact a corollary of the fundamental right to privacy granted in the Egyptian legal system to both natural and legal persons.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319391212 20170117
Law Library (Crown)
Book
136 pages ; 20 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 325 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • SECTION I: ORIGINS OF ISLAMIC LEGAL REVIVALISM-- SECTION II: EUROPEAN LAW AND IMPERIALIST CAMPAIGNS FOR ISLAMIC LEGAL REFORM-- SECTION III: TRANSFORMATIONS IN EDUCATION AND SCHOLARSHIP-- SECTION IV: NEW FORMS OF ISLAMIC LEGAL THOUGHT.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198786016 20161213
In this meticulously researched volume, Leonard Wood presents his ground breaking history of Islamic revivalist thought in Islamic law. Islamic Legal Revival: Reception of European Law and Transformations in Islamic Legal Thought in Egypt, 1879-1952 brings to life the tumultuous history of colonial interventions in Islamic legal consciousness during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It tells the story of the rapid displacement of local Egyptian and Islamic law by transplanted European codes and details the evolution of resultant movements to revive Islamic law. Islamic legal revivalist movements strove to develop a modern version of Islamic law that could be codified and would replace newly imposed European laws. Wood explains in unparalleled depth and with nuance how cutting-edge trends in European legal scholarship inspired influential revivalists and informed their methods in legal thought. Timely and provocative, Islamic Legal Revival tells of the rich achievements of legal experts in Egypt who disrupted tradition in Islamic jurisprudence and created new approaches to Islamic law that were distinctively responsive to demands of the contemporary world. The story told bears important implications for understandings of Egyptian history, Islamic legal history, comparative law, and deeply contested and highly transformative interactions between European and Islamic thought.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198786016 20161213
Green Library
Book
xvi, 325 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The reception of European law in political and social context
  • Early Islamic legal revivalism and national complacency
  • The Sharia bar association journal and the Islamic turn
  • Foreign interventions in Islamic law
  • The long arms of legal thought from Algeria, France, and Germany
  • The comparativist program for Islamic legal reform
  • Education and scholarship in Franco-Egyptian and French law before 1923
  • Education and scholarship in Islamic law, 1868-1923
  • The flourishing of advanced studies after 1923
  • The origins of "general theory" in Islamic legal thought
  • Epilogue
  • Conclusion.
In this meticulously researched volume, Leonard Wood presents his ground breaking history of Islamic revivalist thought in Islamic law. Islamic Legal Revival: Reception of European Law and Transformations in Islamic Legal Thought in Egypt, 1879-1952 brings to life the tumultuous history of colonial interventions in Islamic legal consciousness during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It tells the story of the rapid displacement of local Egyptian and Islamic law by transplanted European codes and details the evolution of resultant movements to revive Islamic law. Islamic legal revivalist movements strove to develop a modern version of Islamic law that could be codified and would replace newly imposed European laws. Wood explains in unparalleled depth and with nuance how cutting-edge trends in European legal scholarship inspired influential revivalists and informed their methods in legal thought. Timely and provocative, Islamic Legal Revival tells of the rich achievements of legal experts in Egypt who disrupted tradition in Islamic jurisprudence and created new approaches to Islamic law that were distinctively responsive to demands of the contemporary world. The story told bears important implications for understandings of Egyptian history, Islamic legal history, comparative law, and deeply contested and highly transformative interactions between European and Islamic thought.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198786016 20161213
Law Library (Crown)
Book
148 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource
Revolutionary Justice narrates the power struggle between the Free Officers and their adversaries in the aftermath of Egypt's July Revolution of 1952 by studying trials held at the Revolution's Court and the People's Court. The establishment of these tribunals coincided with the most serious political crisis between the new regime and the opposition-primarily the Muslim Brothers and the Wafd party, but also senior officials in the previous government. By this point, the initial euphoria and the unbridled adoration for the Free Officers had worn off, and the focus of the public debate shifted to the legitimacy of the army's continued rule. Yoram Meital charts the crucial events of Egyptian Revolution both within and outside the courtroom. The tribunals' transcripts, which constitute the prime source of his study, offer a rare glimpse of the dialogue between parties that held conflicting views. While "show trials" against political dissidents are generally considered of little historical value, Revolutionary Justice lucidly shows that the rhetoric generated by Egypt's special courts played a crucial role in the denouement of political struggles, the creation of new historical trends, and the shaping of both the regime and the opposition's public image. The deliberations at the courtroom reinforced the prevailing emergency atmosphere, helping the junta advance its plans for a new dispensation. On the other hand, the responses of defendants and witnesses during the trial exposed weaknesses in the official hegemonic narrative. Paradoxically, oppositional views that the regime tirelessly endeavored to silence were tolerated and recorded in the courtroom.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190600839 20170206
Book
795 pages ; 24 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 312 pages ; 23 cm
  • A political analysis of the Egyptian judges' revolt / Mohamed Sayed Said
  • The development of relations between the mixed courts and the executive authority in Egypt (1875-1904) / Isabelle Lendrevie-Tournan
  • The law on judicial authority and judicial independence / Mahmud al-Khuayri
  • The general prosecutor between the judicial and executive authorities / Abdallah Khalil
  • The political role of the Egyptian judiciary / Nabil Abdel Fattah
  • The political role of the Supreme Constitutional Court : between principles and practice / Tamir Moustafa
  • The role of the Judges' Club in enhancing the independence of the judiciary and spurring political reform / Atef Shahat Said
  • Reining in the executive : what can the judiciary do? / Nathan J. Brown
  • Judges and elections : the politicization of the judges' discourse / Sherif Younes
  • Exceptional courts and the natural judge / Hafez Abu Seada
  • Judges and acts of sovereignty / Mohamed Maher Abouelenen
  • The government's non-execution of judicial decisions / Negad Mohamed El-Borai
  • Egyptian parties and syndicates vis-à-vis judicial decisions / Ahmed Abd El-Hafeez
  • The judicial authority and civil society / Mustapha Kamel al-Sayyed
  • The relationship between judges and human rights organizations during the 2005 elections and the referendum / Nathalie Bernard-Maugiron
  • The independence of the judiciary as a democratic construct / Hesham El-Bastawissy
  • Appendix: Draft Constituent Declaration of the Union of Arab Judges.
If justice in the Arab world is often marked by a lack of autonomy of the judiciary toward the executive power, one of the characteristic features of the Egyptian judiciary lies in its strength and activism in the defense of democratic values. Judges have been struggling for years to enhance their independence from the executive power and exercise full supervision of the electoral process to achieve transparent elections. Recent years have seen growing tensions in Egypt between the judiciary and the executive authority. In order to gain concessions, judges went as far as to threaten to boycott the supervision of the presidential and legislative elections in the fall of 2005 and to organize sit-ins in the streets. The struggle between the two powers was in full swing in the spring of 2006, when a conference convened in Cairo in early April on the theme of the role of judges in the process of political reform in Egypt and the Arab world. The conference was organized by the Cairo Institute for Human Rights Studies (CIHRS) in cooperation with the Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD). This book is a collection of papers from the conference dealing with Egypt. They allow a better understanding of the role judges are playing in the process of democratic reform in Egypt as well as the limits of their struggle.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789774167010 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
488 pages ; 23 cm.
Parliamentary practice; Egypt; politics and government; history.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
152 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
291 pages ; 20 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
382 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
160 p. ; 20 cm.
Constitutional law; Islamic law; history.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)