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Book
v, 282 pages ; 24 cm.
  • The social contract, democracy, law and order in Africa
  • The concept of law in an indigenous African (Yoruba) society
  • The rule of law, leadership and development
  • Aspects of legal education and sociopolitical order in indigenous Yoruba society
  • Parallel epistemologies, parallel justice systems
  • Human rights and law in indigenous and contemporary Africa
  • Traditional religion, constituted authority, law and order
  • Social ethics, law and development
  • Law, order, Èşù and liminality in the Yoruba legal system
  • Culture, property rights and risk management in African development.
This book, The Rule of Law and Governance in Indigenous Yoruba Society, has two main goals. The first is to provide an exploration of aspects of indigenous Yoruba philosophy of law. The second is to relate this philosophy of law to the Yoruba indigenous traditions of governance, with a view to appreciating the relevance of the Yoruba traditions of law and governance to contemporary African experiments with imported Western democracy in the 21st century. This book is devoted to what can be described as a juridical forensic investigation of Nigeria's predicament of developmental deficit, leading to gross and unconscionable impoverishment of large segments of the population, in the midst of so much natural resources and abundant human capital, using Yoruba indigenous legal traditions as reflective template. The view urged in this book is that Africa has to take seriously the necessity of obedience, observance, enforcement and operation of law as no respecter of persons, groups, affiliations and pedigrees as was in the case in the societies founded by our ancestors, rather than the present scenario whereby the highest bidder procures semblances of justice from a crooked system of common law which was never designed to be fair, equitable and just to the disadvantaged in society. It is concluded that while Africa has much to offer humanity by way of its originary contribution to human civilization, the current situation where in most African countries, the burden of statehood, law enforcement and observance of the laws remain mainly that of poor, minorities or vulnerable segments of society cannot conduce to the renaissance which Africa seeks in the 21st Century or beyond. And it does not assist in the process to argue that since Rome was not built in a day, there is time enough in the future to enable the African people to realize the human dreams of happiness, protection of life and property and, even more significantly, human dignity to live a tolerable existence in an environment of so much wealth and resources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498518376 20161018
Law Library (Crown)
Book
v, 282 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction Chapter 1 The Social Contract - the Foundation of Yoruba Society Chapter 2 The Concept of Law in Yoruba Society Chapter 3 The Rule of Law in Yoruba Society Chapter 4 Aspects of Legal Education in Yoruba Society Chapter 5 Parallel Epistemologies, Parallel Justice Systems in Yorubaland Chapter 6 Human Rights in Yoruba Society Chapter 7 Religion, Authority, Law and Order in Yoruba Society Chapter 8 Social Ethics and Value in Africa Chapter 9 Law, Order, Esu and Liminality in Yoruba Society Chapter 10 Culture, Property Rights and Risk Management in Africa Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498518376 20161018
This book, The Rule of Law and Governance in Indigenous Yoruba Society, has two main goals. The first is to provide an exploration of aspects of indigenous Yoruba philosophy of law. The second is to relate this philosophy of law to the Yoruba indigenous traditions of governance, with a view to appreciating the relevance of the Yoruba traditions of law and governance to contemporary African experiments with imported Western democracy in the 21st century. This book is devoted to what can be described as a juridical forensic investigation of Nigeria's predicament of developmental deficit, leading to gross and unconscionable impoverishment of large segments of the population, in the midst of so much natural resources and abundant human capital, using Yoruba indigenous legal traditions as reflective template. The view urged in this book is that Africa has to take seriously the necessity of obedience, observance, enforcement and operation of law as no respecter of persons, groups, affiliations and pedigrees as was in the case in the societies founded by our ancestors, rather than the present scenario whereby the highest bidder procures semblances of justice from a crooked system of common law which was never designed to be fair, equitable and just to the disadvantaged in society. It is concluded that while Africa has much to offer humanity by way of its originary contribution to human civilization, the current situation where in most African countries, the burden of statehood, law enforcement and observance of the laws remain mainly that of poor, minorities or vulnerable segments of society cannot conduce to the renaissance which Africa seeks in the 21st Century or beyond. And it does not assist in the process to argue that since Rome was not built in a day, there is time enough in the future to enable the African people to realize the human dreams of happiness, protection of life and property and, even more significantly, human dignity to live a tolerable existence in an environment of so much wealth and resources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498518376 20161018
Green Library

3. La Charte du Manden [2015 - ]

Book
<2> volumes : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 21 cm.
  • t. 1. Du serment des chasseurs à l'abolition de l'esclavage (1212-1222)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

4. Strathmore law journal [2015 - ]

Journal/Periodical
1 online resource (volumes)
Peer reviewed journal that publishes scholarly contributions on topical aspects of African law and the law in Africa.
Book
xxix, 802 pages
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 74 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 24 pages ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxviii, 609 p.
Book
1 online resource (xxii, 393 p.) : maps.
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
Book
xii, 339 pages : color illustrations, map ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
57 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
443 p. ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
335 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Pt. I. Conceptualising indigenous land rights in an African context: I. The term "indigenous" - an evolving concept ; II. Relevance and applicability of the concept "indigenous" in an African context ; III. The lands of indigenous peoples: importance and justification ; IV. Indigenous peoples' land dispossession: causes and reactions
  • Pt. II. The judiciary and indigenous peoples' land rights: V. Indigenous peoples land claims in Kenya ; VI. Indigenous peoples' land claims in Tanzania ; VII. Indigenous peoples land claims in Southern Africa
  • Pt. III. Indigenous peoples' land rights in an international and African perspective: VIII. Characteristics and foundation of indigenous peoples' land rights ; IX. Constitutional recognition and states' practice regarding indigenous peoples' rights ; X. Main U.N. instruments and mechanisms relevant for indigenous land rights ; XI. Other relevant global and regional instruments ; XII. General conclusions and recommendations.
Green Library
Book
xvi, 229 p., [6] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), map ; 24 cm.
  • Introducing the Bisha'h Ceremony-- The Mubasha's Family, Khams & Family Traditions-- A Review of Trials by Ordeal Throughout History-- Introduction to the Case Histories-- Theft, Drugs & Property Damage Cases-- Murder & Manslaughter Cases-- Illicit Sexual Relations & Rape Cases-- Marbut -- Inability of the Groom to Perform on His Wedding Night-- Charms, Witchcraft & Healing Ceremonies-- Concluding Remarks-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781845192693 20160528
Trials by ordeal, a judicial practice in which the guilt or innocence of the accused is determined by subjecting them to a painful task, have taken place from ancient Mesopotamia until the present day. This volume focuses on a special type of ordeal by fire called the bisha'h ceremony, which originated in Bedouin societies and continues to be practiced in Egypt today. In Bedouin and Arab rural societies, when somebody suspects another person of theft, property damage, murder, manslaughter, illicit sexual relations, rape, or witchcraft, and there are no witness to the crime, this individual can request the suspect or suspects to accompany him to the mubasha', a Bedouin notable who conducts the ordeal by fire. The bisha'h ceremony was previously performed in Jordan and in Saudi Arabia as well as in Egypt. In Jordan, the late King Hussein banned the ordeal by fire in 1976. In Saudi Arabia, the mubasha' died in the late 1980s, without leaving a successor.Today, in Egypt, near Ismaliyya, a mubasha' continues to practice the ceremonial ordeal in which the suspect licks a ladle that is heated to between 600-900 degrees Celsius. If the suspect's tongue blisters, they are deemed guilty. If the tongue is clear, they are declared innocent. The author observed 169 of such ordeals, many of which are documented and illustrated in this volume. People who take part in the bisha'h ceremony not only come from various regions in Egypt, but also from other North African countries, and from several Middle Eastern countries, including the Gulf States. Most of the cases involve rural peasants rather than Bedouin, but there are also instances where city dwellers take part in the ordeal.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781845192693 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 132 p. ; 22 cm
  • Pt. 1. Understanding the Igbo world and law subjects: Okafor's thesis in the book : Igbo philosophy of law
  • Okafor's contribution to Igbo African jurisprudence
  • Inspirations from Igbo cosmology and folklores
  • Towards an Igbo philosophy of law and right
  • Two basic rights
  • pt. 2. Covenant-based theory of Igbo philosophy of law: Individuals in the order of being
  • Igbo African environment : individualist and collectivist perspectives
  • Understanding covenant as an inter-subjective reality
  • Covenant and rights
  • Theoretical grounds for authority and leadership
  • The democratic bent of covenanted leadership
  • Pt. 3. Is-Ought problem in Igbo jurisprudence: Introducing the Is-Ought problem in Igbo jurisprudence
  • National law does not derive Ought from Is
  • It is valid to derive a legal Ought from a legal Is
  • The Romans had a theory of law : The natural law theory
  • Igbo jurisprudence : an exercise in legal coherentism.
Green Library
Book
148 p. ; 22 cm.
  • The universality of law and order
  • The Igbo in Aniocha North Local Government Area of Delta State
  • The root idea of justice in Igbo
  • The meaning of justice
  • The principles of Igbo law
  • Justice in the resolution of conflicts
  • Social-cultural associations and the administration of justice
  • Legal pluralism
  • The end of justice in Igbo community
  • Conclusion.
Green Library
Book
162 pages ; 21 cm
Green Library
Book
387 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
236 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
206 p. ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)