Book
65 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Recent regulatory development
  • Cases of insider trading in China
  • The judgment of Huang's case
  • Issues for the investors in China
  • Case on Qingdao Kingking and Guoyuan securities
  • Insider trading in the U.S.A.
  • The insider trading cases of Rajaratnam, Goffer and Gupta
  • Conclusion.
China should be considered a late starter in terms of its insider trading regulatory framework. As the Chinese equity market becomes one of the major stock markets in the Asia Pacific region, Chinese legal authorities have started to become aware of the importance of an insider trading regulatory framework in order to facilitate its equity market into a healthy investment environment for investors around the world. This work analyzes the Chinese insider trading regulatory environment, specific cases of Chinese insider trading, and compares these to the insider trading regulatory environment and specific cases of insider trading in the United States.
Green Library
Book
8, 286 p. ; 23 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
3, 1, 272 p. ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
xvii, 285 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Judicial procedures
  • Interrogation techniques
  • Intent and premeditated violence
  • Failure of "Confucian" family values
  • Control of politically marginal groups and individuals
  • Social mobility and crime
  • Imperial intervention.
The little-examined genre of legal case narratives is represented in this fascinating volume, the first collection translated into English of criminal cases - most involving homicide - from late imperial China. These true stories of crimes of passion, family conflict, neighborhood feuds, gang violence, and sedition are a treasure trove of information about social relations and legal procedure. Each narrative describes circumstances leading up to a crime and its discovery, the appearance of the crime scene and the body, the apparent cause of death, speculation about motives and premeditation, and whether self-defense was involved. Detailed testimony is included from the accused and from witnesses, family members, and neighbors, as well as summaries and opinions from local magistrates, their coroners, and other officials higher up the chain of judicial review. Officials explain which law in the Qing dynasty legal code was violated, which corresponding punishment was appropriate, and whether the sentence was eligible for reduction. These records began as reports from magistrates on homicide cases within their jurisdiction that were required by law to be tried first at the county level, then reviewed by judicial officials at the prefectural, provincial, and national levels, with each administrator adding his own observations to the file. Each case was decided finally in Beijing, in the name of the emperor if not by the monarch himself, before sentences could be carried out and the records permanently filed. All of the cases translated here are from the Qing imperial copies, most of which are now housed in the First Historical Archives, Beijing. Robert E. Hegel is Liselotte Dieckmann Professor of Comparative Literature and professor of Chinese, Washington University, St. Louis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295989075 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvii, 285 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Judicial procedures
  • Interrogation techniques
  • Intent and premeditated violence
  • The failure of "Confucian" family values
  • Control of politically marginal groups and individuals
  • Social mobility and crime
  • Imperial intervention.
The little-examined genre of legal case narratives is represented in this fascinating volume, the first collection translated into English of criminal cases - most involving homicide - from late imperial China. These true stories of crimes of passion, family conflict, neighborhood feuds, gang violence, and sedition are a treasure trove of information about social relations and legal procedure. Each narrative describes circumstances leading up to a crime and its discovery, the appearance of the crime scene and the body, the apparent cause of death, speculation about motives and premeditation, and whether self-defense was involved. Detailed testimony is included from the accused and from witnesses, family members, and neighbors, as well as summaries and opinions from local magistrates, their coroners, and other officials higher up the chain of judicial review. Officials explain which law in the Qing dynasty legal code was violated, which corresponding punishment was appropriate, and whether the sentence was eligible for reduction. These records began as reports from magistrates on homicide cases within their jurisdiction that were required by law to be tried first at the county level, then reviewed by judicial officials at the prefectural, provincial, and national levels, with each administrator adding his own observations to the file. Each case was decided finally in Beijing, in the name of the emperor if not by the monarch himself, before sentences could be carried out and the records permanently filed. All of the cases translated here are from the Qing imperial copies, most of which are now housed in the First Historical Archives, Beijing. Robert E. Hegel is Liselotte Dieckmann Professor of Comparative Literature and professor of Chinese, Washington University, St. Louis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295989075 20160528
Green Library
Book
xvii, 484 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The problems of legal reform of police administrative detention powers
  • The legal field and the process of legal reform since 1978
  • Historical antecedents : the 1950s and administrative detention
  • Social order, the "Hard Strike" and administrative detention powers
  • Revival of administrative detention in the reform era : prostitutes and drug addicts
  • Re-education through labour
  • Building a legal environment for police detention
  • Supervision of police conduct : legalisation and contest
  • Legal reform catches up with administrative detention
  • Conclusion: The field of law, the force of law and the powers that be.
Using a new conceptual framework, the author examines the processes of legal reform in post-socialist countries such as China. Drawing on Bourdieu's concept of the 'field', the increasingly complex and contested processes of legal reform are analysed in relation to police powers. The impact of China's post-1978 legal reforms on police powers is examined through a detailed analysis of three administrative detention powers: detention for education of prostitutes; coercive drug rehabilitation; and re-education through labour. The debate surrounding the abolition in 1996 of detention for investigation (also known as shelter and investigation) is also considered. Despite over 20 years of legal reform, police powers remain poorly defined by law and subject to minimal legal constraint. They continue to be seriously and systematically abused. However, there has been both systematic and occasionally dramatic reform of these powers. This book considers the processes which have made these legal changes possible.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521869409 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 343 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Contributors include Thomas Buoye, Pengsheng Chiu, Mariam Epstein, Yasuhio Karasawa, Paul R. Katz, Mark McNicholas, Jonathan Ocko, James St. Andre, Janet Theiss, and Daniel Youd.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295986913 20160528
Green Library
Book
2, 6, 4, 588 p., [1] p. of plates : col. ports. ; 25 cm.
East Asia Library
Software/Multimedia
2 CD-ROMs : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
v.1 Includes the basic economic laws and foreign economic laws and regulations that China has issued since 1999. It includes some laws and regulations that have been amended since China joined the WTO. Contents include administrative regulations, foreign investment laws, foreign investment regulations, departmental rules, industrial orientation for investment, regional orientation for investment, industrial provisions, etc. v.2 Includes laws and regulations dealing with business administration, taxation, insurance, financial management, customs, import/export, international treaties, etc.
East Asia Library
Book
582 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
491 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
4, 6, 319 p. ; 22 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
1, 3, 17, 1535 p. ; 22 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
92, 62 p. ; 26 cm.
East Asia Library
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 28 cm.
East Asia Library
Journal/Periodical
volumes ; 30 cm
Book
6, 764 p., 20 p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
xiv, 348 p. ; 24 cm.
In "The Limits of the Rule of Law in China" 12 authors from different academic disciplines reflect on questions that have troubled Chinese and Western scholars of jurisprudence since classical times. Using data from the early 19th century through the contemporary period, they analyze how tension between formal laws and discretionary judgment is discussed and manifested in the Chinese context. The contributions cover a wide range of topics, from interpreting the rationale for and legacy of Qing practices of collective punishment, confession at trial, and bureaucratic supervision to assessing the political and cultural forces that continue to limit the authority of formal legal institutions in the People's Republic of China.Karen Turner is associate professor of history at Holy Cross College, James V. Feinerman is president of the Committee on Scholarly Communication with China, and R. Kent Guy is associate professor of history at the University of Washington. Other contributors are William P. Alford, Alison W. Conner, Jack L. Dull, Tahirah V. Lee, Jonathan K. Ocko, Pitman B. Potter, Claudia Ross, Lester Ross, Yuanyuan Shen, Joanna Waley-Cohen, and Margaret Y. K. Woo.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295979076 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 191 p., [1] p. of plates : col. ill. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 21 cm
East Asia Library