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Book
9, 18, 421 pages ; 24 cm
"宋刑统"是宋代最重要的法典, 也是研究宋代法制和宋代社会的最基本的参考书 之一.目前通行的各版本"宋刑统", 虽然为我们认识宋代法制和宋代社会提供了有益 帮助, 但也存在各种缺点和不足."宋刑统校证"以目前所 知"宋刑统"最早版本明抄本为底本, 参稽群书, 对"宋刑统"进行了全面, 精细的校勘, 说明和复原, 相对于之前的各版本, 具有版本权威, 校证精详, 忠于原本等优点, 应会对宋代法制, 宋代社会及相关问题的研究起到一定推动作用.
East Asia Library
Book
iv, 680 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Fa lun si pian / Fan Han
  • Fa lü / Zhou Gengsheng
  • She hui fa lü xue / Zhang Zhiben
  • Fa lü xue fang fa lun / Li Zuyin
  • Fa zhi yu min zhi / Wu Zhichun
  • Xin bian fa xue tong lun / Meng Sen
  • Fa xue tong lun / Xia Qin
  • Fa xue tong lun / Qiu Hanping
  • Fa lü lun / Yang Zhongxie
  • Xin jiu yi ming dui zhao biao
  • Zhu ti suo yin.
  • 法论四篇 / 范罕
  • 法律 / 周鲠生
  • 社会法律学 / 张知本
  • 法律学方法论 / 李祖荫
  • 法治与民治 / 吴之椿
  • 新编法学通论 / 孟森
  • 法学通论 / 夏勤
  • 法学通论 / 丘汉平
  • 法律论 / 杨仲协
  • 新旧译名对照表
  • 主题索引.
East Asia Library
Book
2, 2, 10, 4, 4, 267 pages ; 23 cm.
本书从历史传统出发, 围绕清代各直省地方督抚两司等省级司法主体, 以命盗重案为脉络, 剖析督抚等员处理案件的态度与作为. 在地方行政和君臣关系的宏观视野下, 解释各省地方司法制度与司法实践.
East Asia Library
Book
xiv, 245 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Religion and Chinese legal cosmology
  • Early Ming legal cosmology : embodying heavenly principle and human sentiment
  • The Great Ming Code and the world of spirits : regulating rituals in communicating with deities
  • The Great Ming Code and the human realm : creating boundaries for the Ming empire
  • The Great Ming Code and officialdom : rectifying mediating representatives.
After overthrowing the Mongol Yuan dynasty, Zhu Yuanzhang, the founder of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644), proclaimed that he had obtained the Mandate of Heaven (Tianming), enabling establishment of a spiritual orientation and social agenda for China. Zhu, emperor during the Ming's Hongwu reign period, launched a series of social programs to rebuild the empire and define Chinese cultural identity. To promote its reform programs, the Ming imperial court issued a series of legal documents, culminating in The Great Ming Code (Da Ming lu), which supported China's legal system until the Ming was overthrown and also served as the basis of the legal code of the following dynasty, the Qing (1644-1911). This companion volume to Jiang Yonglin's translation of The Great Ming Code (2005) analyzes the thought underlying the imperial legal code. Was the concept of the Mandate of Heaven merely a tool manipulated by the ruling elite to justify state power, or was it essential to their belief system and to the intellectual foundation of legal culture? What role did law play in the imperial effort to carry out the social reform programs? Jiang addresses these questions by examining the transformative role of the Code in educating the people about the Mandate of Heaven. The Code served as a cosmic instrument and moral textbook to ensure "all under Heaven" were aligned with the cosmic order. By promoting, regulating, and prohibiting categories of ritual behavior, the intent of the Code was to provide spiritual guidance to Chinese subjects, as well as to acquire political legitimacy. The Code also obligated officials to obey the supreme authority of the emperor, to observe filial behavior toward parents, to care for the welfare of the masses, and to maintain harmonious relationships with deities. This set of regulations made officials the representatives of the Son of Heaven in mediating between the spiritual and mundane worlds and in governing the human realm. This study challenges the conventional assumption that law in premodern China was used merely as an arm of the state to maintain social control and as a secular tool to exercise naked power. Based on a holistic approach, Jiang argues that the Ming ruling elite envisioned the cosmos as an integrated unit; they saw law, religion, and political power as intertwined, remarkably different from the "modern" compartmentalized worldview. In serving as a cosmic instrument to manifest the Mandate of Heaven, The Great Ming Code represented a powerful religious effort to educate the masses and transform society. Jiang Yonglin is visiting associate professor of East Asian studies at Bryn Mawr College. He is the translator of The Great Ming Code (Da Ming lu).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295990651 20160603
Green Library
Book
vii, 3, 419 p. ; 23 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
iv, iv, 342 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
v, xi, 434 p. ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
1 online resource (civ, 319 pages).
  • AcknowledgmentsNote on the TranslationMing Units of Measure and MoneyIntroduction: The Making of The Great Ming Code The Great Ming CodeThe Imperial Preface to The Great Ming CodeDiagrams 1. Laws on Punishments and General Principles2. Laws on Personnel3. Laws on Revenue4. Laws on Rituals5. Laws on Military Affairs6. Laws on Penal Affairs7. Laws on Public Works GlossaryBibliographyGeneral Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295984490 20180521
Imperial China's dynastic legal codes provide a wealth of information for historians, social scientists, and scholars of comparative law and of literary, cultural, and legal history. Until now, only the Tang (618-907 C.E.) and Qing (1644-1911 C.E.) codes have been available in English translation. The present book is the first English translation of The Great Ming Code (Da Ming lu), which reached its final form in 1397. The translation is preceded by an introductory essay that places the Code in historical context, explores its codification process, and examines its structure and contents. A glossary of Chinese terms is also provided. One of the most important law codes in Chinese history, The Great Ming Code represents a break with the past, following the alien-ruled Yuan (Mongol) dynasty, and the flourishing of culture under the Ming, the last great Han-ruled dynasty. It was also a model for the Qing code, which followed it, and is a fundamental source for understanding Chinese society and culture. The Code regulated all the perceived major aspects of social affairs, aiming at the harmony of political, economic, military, familial, ritual, international, and legal relations in the empire and cosmic relations in the universe. The all-encompassing nature of the Code makes it an encyclopedic document, providing rich materials on Ming history. Because of the pervasiveness of legal proceedings in the culture generally, the Code has relevance far beyond the specialized realm of Chinese legal studies. The basic value system and social norms that the Code imposed became so thoroughly ingrained in Chinese society that the Manchus, who conquered China and established the Qing dynasty, chose to continue the Code in force with only minor changes. The Code made a considerable impact on the legal cultures of other East Asian countries: Yi dynasty Korea, Le dynasty Vietnam, and late Tokugawa and early Meiji Japan. Examining why and how some rules in the Code were adopted and others rejected in these countries will certainly enhance our understanding of the shared culture and indigenous identities in East Asia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295984490 20180521
Book
214 p. ; 23 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
11, 16, 476 p. ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
24, 498 p. ; 20 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
6, 4, 402 p. ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
2, 2, 3, 2, 213 p. ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
5, 317 p. : col. ill. ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
3 v. ; 26 cm.
  • [v. 1-2]. Bing ta meng hen lu
  • [v. 3]. Meng hen lu yu.
  • [v. 1-2]. 病榻夢痕錄
  • [v. 3]. 夢痕錄餘.
East Asia Library
Book
17, 671 p. ; 21 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
2, 2, 2, 5, 9, 956 p. ; 27 cm.
East Asia Library

18. Da Qing lü ji zhu [1746]

Book
3 v. ; 27 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
2, 2, 1145 p. ; 27 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
xii, 179 p. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)