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Book
365 p. ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 298 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Law, politics and religion in Syria : past and present
  • Mapping the plurality of jurisdictions : the laws of personal status
  • Debating and changing family law
  • Patriarchy, religion and legal rules
  • The versatility of personal status law : legal practices in a Sharʻiyya court
  • The Catholic court : guardian of order and sacraments
  • Conclusions.
The current Syrian crisis has its roots in the sectarian nature of the country's multi-religious society. Since Ottoman times, the different religious communities have enjoyed the right to regulate and administer their own family relations. Matters of personal status including marriage, divorce, child custody and inheritance continue to be managed by a variety of religious laws and courts operating simultaneously within the legal system of the state. However, this complex system of competing jurisdictions has also affected inter-communal relations and has been used to deepen communal divides. Esther van Eijk discusses socio-legal practices in Syria by focusing on three courts: a shar'iyya, a Catholic court and a Greek-Orthodox court. While the plurality of Syrian family law is clear, she shows how - irrespective of religious affiliation - it is nevertheless characterised by the prevalence of shared cultural or patriarchal views and norms on marital relations, family and gender. Based on extensive fieldwork, Family Law in Syria offers a detailed analysis of a country that has in recent years been inaccessible to researchers.The book is a vital contribution to the growing literature on personal status laws in the Middle East and sheds light on the historical, socio-political and religious complexities and fault-lines that mark contemporary Syria.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781784533342 20160823
Law Library (Crown)
Book
423 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
38 p. : col. map ; 27 cm.
  • Summary
  • Chronology of events
  • Summary and extrajudicial executions
  • Other unlawful killings of civilians
  • Burning and destruction of houses and other property
  • Arbitrary detention, torture, and enforced disappearances
  • Applicability of international humanitarian law
  • Recommendations.
As the United Nations special envoy Kofi Annan was negotiating with the Syrian government an end to the fighting in Syria in late March 2012, government forces launched a series of large-scale attacks against opposition-controlled towns in the northern part of Idlib governorate, near the Turkish border. Between March 22 and April 6, government forces killed at least 95 civilians in five towns, burned, destroyed and looted hundreds of houses and stores, and arbitrarily detained dozens of people, most of whom remain in detention to date. At least 35 of the killed civilians were executed when detained or otherwise under the control of government forces. This report is based on interviews with victims and witnesses conducted in five towns in Syria that came under attack during the two-week long military operation. It contains detailed descriptions of the attacks, including several incidents of mass executions.
Green Library
Book
78 p. : ill., map ; 27 cm.
  • Summary
  • Recommendations
  • To the UN Security Council
  • To All Countries
  • To the Arab League
  • To Russia and China
  • To the Syrian Government
  • Methodology
  • I. Arrest, Detention, and Torture in Syria
  • Arbitrary Arrests and Unlawful Detention
  • Conditions in Detention
  • Systematic Use of Torture and Deaths in Custody
  • Detention and Torture of Children, Women and Elderly
  • II. Syria's Detention Facilities
  • Department of Military Intelligence
  • Branch 291--Damascus--Branch 235 ("Palestine Branch")
  • Damascus--Branch 248--Damascus
  • Branch 227--Damascus
  • Branch 215--Damascus
  • Branch 245--Daraa
  • Aleppo Branch
  • Branch 271--Idlib
  • Homs Branch
  • Latakia Branch
  • Air Force Intelligence Directorate
  • Mezzeh Airport Branch-- Damascus
  • Bab Touma Branch--Damascus
  • Daraa Branch
  • Homs branch
  • Latakia Branch
  • Political Security Directorate
  • Mezzeh area--Damascus
  • Idlib Branch
  • Homs Branch
  • Latakia Branch
  • Daraa Branch
  • General Intelligence Directorate
  • Branch 285--Damascus
  • Al-Khattib Branch--Damascus
  • Latakia Branch
  • Aleppo Branch
  • Idlib Branch
  • Homs Branch
  • Ad Hoc and Joint Detention Facilities
  • Central Prison--Idlib
  • Acknowledgements.
"Since the beginning of anti-government protests in March 2011, Syrian authorities have subjected tens of thousands of people to arbitrary arrests, unlawful detentions, enforced disappearances, ill-treatment and torture using an extensive network of detention facilities, an archipelago of torture centers, scattered throughout Syria. Based on more than 200 interviews with former detainees, including women and children, and defectors from the Syrian military, intelligence and security agencies, Torture Archipelago: Arbitrary Arrests, Torture and Enforced Disappearances in Syria's Underground Prisons since March 2011 focuses on 28 of these detention facilities. For each facility, most of them with cells and torture chambers and one or several underground floors, we provide the location, identify the agencies responsible for operating them, document the type of ill-treatment and torture used, and name, to the extent possible, the individuals running them. The facilities included in this report are those for which multiple witnesses have indicated the same location and provided detailed descriptions about the use of torture. The actual number of such facilities is likely much higher. The systematic patterns of ill-treatment and torture documented in this report clearly point to a state policy of torture and ill-treatment and therefore constitute a crime against humanity. The United Nations Security Council should refer the situation in Syria to the International Criminal Court, adopt targeted sanctions on officials credibly implicated in abuses, and demand that Syria grant recognized international detention monitors access to all detention facilities, including those mentioned in this report."--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
54 p. : col. map ; 27 cm.
  • Summary
  • Note on Methodology
  • I. Timeline of Protest and Repression in Syria
  • II. Crimes against Humanity and Other Violations in Daraa
  • Systematic killings of protestors and bystanders
  • Killings during attack on al-Omari mosque and protests that followed, March 23-25, 2011
  • Killings during two protests on April 8, 2011
  • Killings during a protest and a funeral procession in Izraa, April 22-23, 2011
  • Killings during the siege of Daraa and neighboring villages and April 29 protest
  • Other incidents of killings in and around Daraa
  • Allegations of violence by protesters
  • Denial of medical assistance
  • Arbitrary arrests, "disappearances" and torture
  • Large-scale sweep operations
  • Torture and ill-treatment in detention
  • Targeted arrests and "disappearances"
  • Executions and mass graves
  • Effect of the siege
  • Information blockade
  • Recommendations
  • To the Syrian Government
  • To the UN Security Council
  • To the UN Human Rights Council
  • To United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
  • To the Arab League
  • Acknowledgments.
"Since the beginning of anti-government protests in March 2011, Syrian security forces have killed hundreds of protesters and arbitrarily arrested thousands, subjecting many of them to brutal torture in detention. The security forces routinely prevented the wounded from getting medical assistance, and imposed a siege on several towns, depriving the population of basic services. This report, based on more than 50 interviews with witnesses and victims, focuses on the abuses in Daraa governorate in southwestern Syria, where some of the worst violence took place. The nature and scale of abuses, which, as Human Rights Watch research indicates, were not only systematic but implemented as part of a state policy, strongly suggest these abuses qualify as crimes against humanity. Human Rights Watch calls on the Syrian government to immediately halt the use of lethal force against peaceful demonstrators and unconditionally release those arbitrarily arrested. It calls on the Security Council to push for investigation and prosecution of the grave systemic violations committed in Syria, and, failing the appropriate governmental steps to do so, refer the situation in Syria to the International Criminal Court."--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
744 p. ; 29 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
35 p. : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
"Ten years after succeeding his father as president of Syria, Bashar al-Asad has liberalized parts of his country's economy, but has not delivered on his promises to increase public freedoms or improve the government's human rights record. Ordinary Syrians continue to risk jail merely for criticizing their president, writing a blog, or protesting government policies. This report reviews Bashar al-Asad's human rights record in five key areas: repression of political and human rights activism; restrictions on freedom of expression; torture; treatment of Kurds; and addressing Syria's legacy of enforced disappearances. The assessment is bleak. Without reform in these five areas, al-Asad's rule merely extends that of his father: government by repression."--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
68, 255 p. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
68, 255 p. ; 28 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
233 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
i, 14 p. ; 28 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
144 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
7, 29 leaves ; 33 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
158 leaves.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

16. Faṭīr Ṣihyūn [1986]

Book
233 p. : col. ill., facsim. ; 28 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
1 v. (various pagings) ; 33 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
54 p. 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xx, 135 p. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
21 pages ; 26 cm
Hoover Library