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Book
257 pages : charts ; 22 cm.
  • Approches comparatives -- Remarques sur les Assises de Jérusalem -- La "légendarisation" de Godefroy de Bouillon. Étude d'un processus de mythification -- Le contrôle de la féodalité par le roi au XIIe siècle. Les cas hiérosolymitain et siculo-normand -- L'image de la féodalité dans l'Historia Orientalis de Jacques de Vitry -- Aux origines du péché originel quant à la mauvaise utilisation des Assises de Jérusalem. L'édition de Gaspard Thaumas de la Thaumassière (1690) -- Regards croisés -- La justice, le souverain, et le pouvoir dans le Livre au Roi. De l'arbre au rhizome -- Les Assises de la Cour des bourgeois de Jérusalem, la question de leurs sources -- Le règlement des conflits dans le Livre des Assises de Jean d'Ibelin -- The Assises de Jérusalem and Legal Practice. The Political Crisis in Cyprus in the Early Fourteenth Century -- L'instrumentalisation du mariage des vassales dans les Assises de Jérusalem -- La procédure criminelle dans les Assises de Jérusalem -- Les Lignages d'Outremer, un texte ou des textes ? -- Conclusions. La société, le droit et l'imaginaire dans l'Orient latin... et ailleurs.
"Plus d'un siècle après leur redécouverte, les Assises de Jérusalem sont quasiment tombées dans un oubli généralisé en France. Dès lors, l'organisation d'une rencontre devenait nécessaire afin de faire le point sur ce texte et s'interroger sur les raisons de cette indifférence. À l'aide des nouvelles approches scientifiques basées sur une démarche pluridisciplinaire reposant sur une nette inflexion vers le comparatisme, les contributions réunies ici ont permis de révéler la nature des Assises de Jérusalem, c'est-à-dire un corpus normatif, qui renvoie à la fois aux structures féodales occidentales et à la situation politique, sociale et juridique du royaume de Jérusalem."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
80 pages ; 20 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
347 pages ; 23 cm
  • Introduction to Oman's basic statue
  • Human rights protections and safeguards
  • Omani nationality and human rights
  • Democracy, shura, and public participation
  • Freedom of association.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
271 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 313 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Colonial transplants
  • Colonial copyright
  • The making of British colonial copyright
  • Legislating copyright in Palestine
  • Constructing culture and the image of the Hebrew author
  • Copyright law and social norms
  • Setting the law in motion
  • Copyright on the air
  • Telegraphic news
  • Arab copyright
  • At a crossroad.
When the British Empire enacted copyright law for its colonies and called it colonial, or Imperial, copyright, it had its own interests in mind. Deconstructing the imperial policy regarding copyright offers a startling glimpse into how this law was received in the colonies themselves. Offering the first in-depth study from the point of view of the colonized, this book suggests a general model of Colonial Copyright as it was understood as the intersection of legal transplants, colonial law, and the particular features of copyright, especially authorship. Taking as a case study the story of Mandate Palestine (1917-1948), the book details the untold history of the copyright law that became the basis of Israeli law, and still is the law in the Palestinian Authority. It queries the British motivation in enacting copyright law, traces their first, indifferent reaction, and continues with the gradual absorption into the local legal and cultural systems. In the modern era copyright law is at the forefront of globalization but this was no less true when colonial copyright first emerged. By shining a light on the introduction and reception of copyright law in Mandate Palestine, the book illuminates the broader themes of copyright law: the questions surrounding the concept of authorship; the relationship between copyright and the demands of progress; and the complications of globalization.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199661138 20160610
Law Library (Crown)
Book
8 v. : ill., maps (some col.) ; 26 cm. + 1 slip-case containing 20 sheets of folded maps.
  • Volume 1. Standard Reference Works, Part I-- Volume 2. Standard Reference Works, Part II-- Volume 3. Standard Reference Works, Part III-- Volume 4. Part I. Orders-in-Council-- Part II. Ordinances, Public Notices, Proclamations and Regulations-- Volume 5. Official Reports and Memoranda, Part I-- Volume 6. Official Reports and Memoranda, Part II-- Volume 7. Official Reports and Memoranda, Part III-- Volume 8. Official Reports and Memoranda, Part IV-- Maps 1-16.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781840972603 20160604
Embedded in the question of land is a rich diversity of economic, social, legal and political relationships. This collection of governmental efforts to understand and control the variety of rights that governed access and management of land should be of wide interest. Some of these reports (for example, those authored by Sir John Hope-Simpson, Lewis French, and C. F. Strickland) are frequently cited in the extant literature, but exist only in government archives. Other reports (for example, those of the chief land adviser to the Palestine government, Sir Ernest Dowson) are less well known than they ought to be, both for their significance to the inter-war history of Palestine and, as importantly, to the comparative study of colonial administrations in the twentieth century. Reproducing these reports here in their original draft form, and where possible including marginalia and copy edits, sheds useful light on the contentious inner workings of the policy-making process in a colonial context.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781840972603 20160604
Law Library (Crown)
Book
108 p. : ill., ports., facsims. ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
13, 420 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxiii, 264 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Entering a sociolegal arena
  • Historical settings
  • Family and court
  • Presenting claims
  • The court arena
  • Documenting the family
  • Negotiating versions
  • Gender and family
  • Attorneys and the justice of the qadi
  • Reshaping solutions
  • Family experiences
  • Conclusion: family, court, and modernity.
This book challenges prevailing assumptions about family, courts of law, and the nature of modernity in Muslim societies against the backdrop of Haifa and Jaffa during "the long nineteenth century". The popular image of the family and the court of law in Muslim societies is one of traditional, unchanging social frameworks. Iris Agmon suggests an entirely different view, grounded in a detailed study of nineteenth-century Ottoman court records from the flourishing Palestinian port cities of Haifa and Jaffa. She depicts the Sharia Muslim court of law as a dynamic institution, capable of adapting to rapid and profound social changes - indeed, of playing an active role in generating these changes. Court and family interact and transform themselves, each other, and the society of which they form part. Agmon's book is a significant contribution to scholarship on both family history and legal culture in the social history of the Middle East.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815630623 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 312 p. ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Structure, jurisdiction, and identity
  • Cultural images and the substance of law
  • Case law and the reflection of identity
  • Legislation and the representation of identity
  • Legal education and the formation of identity
  • Crafting law to fit identity
  • Limiting identity in law
  • Arab lawyers and French identity
  • Arif al-Arif and nomadic identity.
One of the major questions facing the world today is the role of law in shaping identity and in balancing tradition with modernity. In an arid corner of the Mediterranean region in the first decades of the twentieth century, Mandate Palestine was confronting these very issues. Assaf Likhovski examines the legal history of Palestine, showing how law and identity interacted in a complex colonial society in which British rulers and Jewish and Arab subjects lived together. Law in Mandate Palestine was not merely an instrument of power or a method of solving individual disputes, says Likhovski. It was also a way of answering the question, "Who are we?" British officials, Jewish lawyers, and Arab scholars all turned to the law in their search for their identities, and all used it to create and disseminate a hybrid culture in which Western and non-Western norms existed simultaneously. Uncovering a rich arsenal of legal distinctions, notions, and doctrines used by lawyers to mediate between different identities, Likhovski provides a comprehensive account of the relationship between law and identity. His analysis suggests a new approach to both the legal history of Mandate Palestine and colonial societies in general.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807830178 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 312 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
  • Structure, jurisdiction, and identity
  • Cultural images and the substance of law
  • Case law and the reflection of identity
  • Legislation and the representation of identity
  • Legal education and the formation of identity
  • Crafting law to fit identity
  • Limiting identity in law
  • Arab lawyers and French identity
  • ʻArif Al-ʻArif and nomadic identity.
One of the major questions facing the world today is the role of law in shaping identity and in balancing tradition with modernity. In an arid corner of the Mediterranean region in the first decades of the twentieth century, Mandate Palestine was confronting these very issues. Assaf Likhovski examines the legal history of Palestine, showing how law and identity interacted in a complex colonial society in which British rulers and Jewish and Arab subjects lived together. Law in Mandate Palestine was not merely an instrument of power or a method of solving individual disputes, says Likhovski. It was also a way of answering the question, "Who are we?" British officials, Jewish lawyers, and Arab scholars all turned to the law in their search for their identities, and all used it to create and disseminate a hybrid culture in which Western and non-Western norms existed simultaneously. Uncovering a rich arsenal of legal distinctions, notions, and doctrines used by lawyers to mediate between different identities, Likhovski provides a comprehensive account of the relationship between law and identity. His analysis suggests a new approach to both the legal history of Mandate Palestine and colonial societies in general.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780807830178 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 312 p. : ill.
  • Structure, jurisdiction, and identity
  • Cultural images and the substance of law
  • Case law and the reflection of identity
  • Legislation and the representation of identity
  • Legal education and the formation of identity
  • Crafting law to fit identity
  • Limiting identity in law
  • Arab lawyers and French identity
  • Arif al-Arif and nomadic identity.
Book
xii, 262 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 216 p. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Mandatory Palestine: the enigma of the missing colonial state-- 2. Whose tradition?: imageries of the past in Hebrew law-- 3. State law and communal justice-- 4. Celebrating authenticity and practising hybridity-- 5. Nationalism as a disciplinary regime-- 6. Lawyering the nation-- 7. Nation-building and the containment of legality-- 8. Dead law and statism: a suggested lesson.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521631839 20160528
Treating law as an essential cultural component in a nation-building project, this book offers a socio-historical analysis of a community-based system of justice under colonial rule. It traces the attempts of Jewish jurists-nationalists to establish a non-religious system of Hebrew Courts in British-ruled Palestine. This book analyzes the secular, national and anti-colonial ideology of the Hebrew Law of Peace and shows that Jewish religious groups, secular lawyers and leading Zionist institutions undermined the Hebrew Law project. The book develops the concept of 'dual colonialism' to analyze the complex relations between Jewish settlers and British colonizers, and explores the reluctance of leading Zionists to allow a process of nation-building from below that would have allowed communities, rather than organized quasi-state institutions, to define the trajectory of Jewish nationalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521631839 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 458 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
v, 304 leaves.
Law Library (Crown)

18. Ḳaṿ ha-haganah [1991]

Book
284 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
530 p. in various pagings ; 27 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
288 p. : port. ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)