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Book
ix, 572 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • Assigned residence
  • Border/barrier
  • Combatants
  • Deportations
  • Export of knowledge
  • Future-oriented measures
  • Geneva law
  • House demolitions
  • Investigations
  • Jewish settlements
  • Kinship
  • Lawfare
  • Military courts
  • Nomos
  • Outside/inside
  • Proportionality
  • Quality of life
  • Regularization law
  • Security prisoners
  • Temporary/indefinite
  • Usufruct
  • Violence
  • War crimes
  • X rays
  • Youth
  • Zone.
Israel's half-a-century long rule over the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and some of its surrounding legal issues, have been the subject of extensive academic literature. Yet, to date, there has been no comprehensive, theoretically-informed, and empirically-based academic study of the role of various legal mechanisms, norms, and concepts in shaping, legitimizing, and responding to the Israeli control regime. This book seeks to fill this gap, while shedding new light on the subject. Through the format of an A-Z legal lexicon, it critically reflects on, challenges, and redefines the language, knowledge, and practices surrounding the Israeli control regime. Taken together, the entries illuminate the relation between global and local forces - legal, political, and cultural - in Israel and Palestine. The study of the terms involved provides insights that are relevant to other situations elsewhere in the world, particularly with regard to belligerent occupation, the law's role in relation to state violence, and justice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107156524 20180625
Law Library (Crown)
Book
144 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
  • Contents and AbstractsPrologue chapter abstractThe reader joins Issa, a Palestinian construction worker from the West Bank who suddenly received word from his employer that his permit has been denied by the Israeli military, on the long and convoluted journey through the bureaucracy of the occupation, to try to recover his permit. He encounters many obstacles: police detention, attempts to find clandestine ways to work during closure, and mostly, long waiting times in offices and courtyards of the bureaucracy. Following his classification as a security threat by the secret service, he engages two lawyers in his struggle, one of them the author, who represent him in Israel's Supreme Court in the attempt to annul his classification as a security threat and secure his work permit. 1Dangerous Populations chapter abstractThis chapter provides a concise history of Israel's military rule over the Occupied West Bank, focusing on population monitoring and control. It outlines the development of the messy bureaucracy of the occupation and the establishment of the permit regime by an array of agencies, technologies, rules, and practices. Following the institutional changes brought about by the Oslo Accords, the chapter shows that while it is administratively inefficient, the population management system followed an effective institutional logic to achieve two major goals. First, it makes the Palestinian population dependent on the administrative system to construct, maintain, and widen the scope of monitoring and control, based on a racial separation through laws and enforcement. Second, it produces uncertainty, disorientation, and suspicion within Palestinian society through the prevention of mobility. 2Perpetual Emergency chapter abstractThis chapter analyzes the shift in the role of Israel's secret service, the Shin Bet, in the bureaucracy of the occupation, from an intelligence agency to the central organization that designed, strategized, and made administrative decisions regarding the population of the West Bank. Focusing on the expanding category of Palestinians classified as security threats that encompassed over a quarter of a million people after the Second Intifada, the chapter explores the contradictory profiling practices. It suggests that the permit regime became the major asset of the Shin Bet, increasing its capabilities to recruit thousands of low-grade informers in the West Bank. 3Labor of Uncertainty chapter abstractThe permit regime includes the Ministries of Economy, Interior, and Defense, which created a political economy that controlled the lives of Palestinian Laborers and their employers. The complex array of military and civil organizations that populated the expanding flow chart of regulations, forms, and offices created an economy of shortage, in which there were consistently fewer permit quotas than need by employers. This chapter traces how this administrative shortage, the product of the negotiation between the different fragmented institutions of the state, created the perfect conditions for a black market of permits sold, rented, and exchanged between employers and employees, ruled by middlemen, intermediaries, and semiofficials who ran networks of forgeries that were criminalized but not severely punished. 4Effective Inefficiency chapter abstractThis chapter outlines how institutional practices of the permit regime affected and shaped Palestinian daily life in the West Bank by disorientation, atomization, and routinization of emergency. Administrative flexibility and the wide discretion of clerks who actually made law during the permit process produced a different kind of bureaucracy, where contradictory decisions, overlapping policies, and secret information turned freedom of movement into an unknown variable in Palestinian life across Israel and the Occupied Territories. Attempts of international and human rights organizations to standardize practices helped develop the permit regime, while resistance to life in the emergency took various forms. People found ways to obtain permits, broke pathways into Israel and across the separation wall, and challenged the Shin Bet classifications in the High Court. Epilogue chapter abstractThe reader joins the author as she recounts her first contact with the bureaucracy of the occupation through the military courts of Judea and Samaria. She sets up a makeshift office on Saturday mornings at a restaurant in Area C, where Palestinians who are denied entry because they are classified as a security threat come to prepare documents and affidavits for their petition to the Supreme Court. She then realizes that legal attempts to retrieve permits and remove someone's classification as a security threat are futile. Understanding that legal representation of Palestinians provides legitimacy to an illegal colonial bureaucracy that constituted a security threat for both Israelis and Palestinians leads her to leave her practice.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503602823 20180409
In 1991, the Israeli government introduced emergency legislation canceling the general exit permit that allowed Palestinians to enter Israel. The directive, effective for one year, has been reissued annually ever since, turning the Occupied Territories into a closed military zone. Today, Israel's permit regime for Palestinians is one of the world's most extreme and complex apparatuses for population management. Yael Berda worked as a human rights lawyer in Jerusalem and represented more than two hundred Palestinian clients trying to obtain labor permits to enter Israel from the West Bank. With Living Emergency, she brings readers inside the permit regime, offering a first-hand account of how the Israeli secret service, government, and military civil administration control the Palestinian population. Through interviews with Palestinian laborers and their families, conversations with Israeli clerks and officials, and research into the archives and correspondence of governmental organizations, Berda reconstructs the institutional framework of the labyrinthine permit regime, illuminating both its overarching principles and its administrative practices. In an age where terrorism, crime, and immigration are perceived as intertwined security threats, she reveals how the Israeli example informs global homeland security and border control practices, creating a living emergency for targeted populations worldwide.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503602823 20180409
Law Library (Crown)
Book
108 p. : colored illustrations ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 509 pages : maps ; 25 cm
  • Preface
  • Introduction: The Zufin gate
  • The battleground
  • Deportation : raising the stakes
  • Settlements : banging one's head against the wall of the political
  • Against torture
  • The separation barrier
  • Unauthorized outposts
  • Security and the piccolo
  • Conclusion: Sand on the slope.
A farmer in the occupied West Bank, cut off from his olive groves by Israel's controversial separation wall, asked Israeli human rights lawyer Michael Sfard to petition the courts to allow a gate to be built in the wall. But while the gate would provide the farmer with relief, would it not also confer legitimacy on the wall itself? The defense of human rights is often marked by such dilemmas, which are especially acute in Israel, where lawyers must seek redress for the abuse of Palestinian rights from the country's High Court - that is, from the court of the abuser. In The Wall and the Gate, Michael Sfard chronicles this previously untold struggle, and examines the core ethics of legal work for human rights. Recounting key cases and issues - including deportations, confiscation of land, punitive home demolitions, torture, and targeted killings - he lays bare the reality of the occupation, and exposes the surreal legal structures that have been erected to put a stamp of lawfulness on clear violations of international law. Weighing the success of the legal effort, he reaches conclusions that are no less paradoxical than the fight itself. Written with emotional force, vivid storytelling, and penetrating analysis, The Wall and the Gate offers a radically new perspective on a much-covered conflict and a subtle, painful reckoning with the moral ambiguities inherent in the pursuit of justice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781250122704 20180326
Law Library (Crown)
Book
144 pages ; 20 cm
  • Contents and AbstractsPrologue chapter abstractThe reader joins Issa, a Palestinian construction worker from the West Bank who suddenly received word from his employer that his permit has been denied by the Israeli military, on the long and convoluted journey through the bureaucracy of the occupation, to try to recover his permit. He encounters many obstacles: police detention, attempts to find clandestine ways to work during closure, and mostly, long waiting times in offices and courtyards of the bureaucracy. Following his classification as a security threat by the secret service, he engages two lawyers in his struggle, one of them the author, who represent him in Israel's Supreme Court in the attempt to annul his classification as a security threat and secure his work permit. 1Dangerous Populations chapter abstractThis chapter provides a concise history of Israel's military rule over the Occupied West Bank, focusing on population monitoring and control. It outlines the development of the messy bureaucracy of the occupation and the establishment of the permit regime by an array of agencies, technologies, rules, and practices. Following the institutional changes brought about by the Oslo Accords, the chapter shows that while it is administratively inefficient, the population management system followed an effective institutional logic to achieve two major goals. First, it makes the Palestinian population dependent on the administrative system to construct, maintain, and widen the scope of monitoring and control, based on a racial separation through laws and enforcement. Second, it produces uncertainty, disorientation, and suspicion within Palestinian society through the prevention of mobility. 2Perpetual Emergency chapter abstractThis chapter analyzes the shift in the role of Israel's secret service, the Shin Bet, in the bureaucracy of the occupation, from an intelligence agency to the central organization that designed, strategized, and made administrative decisions regarding the population of the West Bank. Focusing on the expanding category of Palestinians classified as security threats that encompassed over a quarter of a million people after the Second Intifada, the chapter explores the contradictory profiling practices. It suggests that the permit regime became the major asset of the Shin Bet, increasing its capabilities to recruit thousands of low-grade informers in the West Bank. 3Labor of Uncertainty chapter abstractThe permit regime includes the Ministries of Economy, Interior, and Defense, which created a political economy that controlled the lives of Palestinian Laborers and their employers. The complex array of military and civil organizations that populated the expanding flow chart of regulations, forms, and offices created an economy of shortage, in which there were consistently fewer permit quotas than need by employers. This chapter traces how this administrative shortage, the product of the negotiation between the different fragmented institutions of the state, created the perfect conditions for a black market of permits sold, rented, and exchanged between employers and employees, ruled by middlemen, intermediaries, and semiofficials who ran networks of forgeries that were criminalized but not severely punished. 4Effective Inefficiency chapter abstractThis chapter outlines how institutional practices of the permit regime affected and shaped Palestinian daily life in the West Bank by disorientation, atomization, and routinization of emergency. Administrative flexibility and the wide discretion of clerks who actually made law during the permit process produced a different kind of bureaucracy, where contradictory decisions, overlapping policies, and secret information turned freedom of movement into an unknown variable in Palestinian life across Israel and the Occupied Territories. Attempts of international and human rights organizations to standardize practices helped develop the permit regime, while resistance to life in the emergency took various forms. People found ways to obtain permits, broke pathways into Israel and across the separation wall, and challenged the Shin Bet classifications in the High Court. Epilogue chapter abstractThe reader joins the author as she recounts her first contact with the bureaucracy of the occupation through the military courts of Judea and Samaria. She sets up a makeshift office on Saturday mornings at a restaurant in Area C, where Palestinians who are denied entry because they are classified as a security threat come to prepare documents and affidavits for their petition to the Supreme Court. She then realizes that legal attempts to retrieve permits and remove someone's classification as a security threat are futile. Understanding that legal representation of Palestinians provides legitimacy to an illegal colonial bureaucracy that constituted a security threat for both Israelis and Palestinians leads her to leave her practice.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503602823 20180409
In 1991, the Israeli government introduced emergency legislation canceling the general exit permit that allowed Palestinians to enter Israel. The directive, effective for one year, has been reissued annually ever since, turning the Occupied Territories into a closed military zone. Today, Israel's permit regime for Palestinians is one of the world's most extreme and complex apparatuses for population management. Yael Berda worked as a human rights lawyer in Jerusalem and represented more than two hundred Palestinian clients trying to obtain labor permits to enter Israel from the West Bank. With Living Emergency, she brings readers inside the permit regime, offering a first-hand account of how the Israeli secret service, government, and military civil administration control the Palestinian population. Through interviews with Palestinian laborers and their families, conversations with Israeli clerks and officials, and research into the archives and correspondence of governmental organizations, Berda reconstructs the institutional framework of the labyrinthine permit regime, illuminating both its overarching principles and its administrative practices. In an age where terrorism, crime, and immigration are perceived as intertwined security threats, she reveals how the Israeli example informs global homeland security and border control practices, creating a living emergency for targeted populations worldwide.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503602823 20180409
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (207 pages) : illustrations, tables
In the space of only a few years, the Jordanian legal system was transformed from an Ottoman-era regime which made few provisions for intellectual property rights to one which incorporated all the provisions of TRIPS. The TRIPS principles, designed to protect the interests of multinational media and technology companies, thereby became grafted onto the legal architecture of a developing country which lacked judicial expertise on intellectual property, and whose population was culturally averse to recognizing such rights. This book provides a detailed study of this transformation, and the ideological and financial pressures which brought it about. The book argues that the standards for IP protection have been elevated beyond the level at which Jordan is able to enforce compliance. This is damaging Jordan's legal institutions, generating ill-will towards international legal norms, and foreclosing possibilities of innovation via imitation that could bring economic benefits to Jordan, the Middle East, and to the global economy. This is the first detailed study of the impact of TRIPS on a Middle Eastern country, and will be of both academic and practical relevance to all who are interested in intellectual property rights, development, international law, globalization, and the Middle East.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781443851633 20180530
Book
263 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Bedouins; conflict management; palestine.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
78 p. : col. ill., col. maps ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
111 p. : col. map ; 28 cm.
  • Summary
  • Background
  • Abuses against Domestic Workers
  • Disempowerment
  • Residency Fines and Repatriation Cost
  • Forced Labor
  • Redress
  • Recommendations
  • To the Jordanian Ministry of Labor
  • To the Jordanian Ministry of Interior
  • To the Public Security Directorate
  • To the Jordanian Ministry of Justice
  • To the Jordanian Council of Ministers
  • To the Governments of Indonesia, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka
  • To the International Labour Organization, the International Organization for Migration, UN Women, International Donors, and Other States
  • Methodology
  • I. Background
  • Recruitment
  • Bilateral Relations
  • Employer Views
  • Jordanian Legal Reform
  • II. Abuses against Domestic Workers
  • Criminal Abuses
  • Physical, Sexual, and Verbal Abuse
  • Confinement
  • Food Deprivation
  • Denial of Medical Care
  • Labor Abuses
  • Nonpayment of Salaries
  • Excessive Work
  • Inadequate Quarters
  • III. Disempowerment
  • Recruitment and Arrival
  • Fees and Debt
  • Lack of Information, Deception
  • No Copy of Contract
  • Confiscation of Documents
  • Nowhere to Turn
  • Isolation and Lack of Information
  • Prohibition of Communication
  • Lack of Shelter
  • Recruitment Agencies
  • IV. Residency Fines and Repatriation Costs
  • Legal Residency and Visa "Overstayer" Fines
  • Cost of Repatriation
  • V. Forced Labor
  • Agencies' Forced Labor
  • Forced Labor Exacted by Employers
  • Forced Labor after End of Contract
  • Forced Work at another Employer
  • VI. Redress
  • Lack of Inspection
  • Lack of Legal Aid, Case Workers, Interpreters
  • Escape, Countercharges, and the Police
  • Passport Retrieval
  • Salary Disputes
  • Prosecution Failures
  • VII. Employer Grievances
  • Lack of Skills
  • Compensation for Recruitment Expenses
  • VIII. Jordanian Law and International Standards
  • Security of the Person
  • Freedom of Movement
  • Residency Status
  • Fair and Decent Work
  • Servitude, Forced Labor, and Trafficking
  • Contractual Rights
  • Judicial Redress
  • Acknowledgments.
"Despite significant legal reforms in recent years, the chances of a migrant domestic worker (MDW) having all her human rights respected and protected in Jordan are slim, if non-existent. Domestic Plight records systemic and systematic abuses, in some cases amounting to forced labor, experienced by some of the 70,000 Indonesian, Sri Lankan, and Filipina MDWs in Jordan. Abuses included beatings, forced confinement around the clock, passport confiscation, and forcing MDWs to work more than 16 hours a day, seven days a week, without full pay. MDWs who escaped or tried to complain about abuse found little shelter and agencies forcibly returned them to abusive employers. Jordanian officials provided little help, including prosecutors, who rarely applied Jordan's anti-trafficking law to MDWs. The report traces abuse to a recruitment system in which employers and recruitment agencies disempower workers through deceit, debt, and blocking information about rights and means of redress; and a work environment that isolates the worker and engenders dependency on employers and recruitment agencies under laws that penalize escape. Jordanian law contains provisions, such as allowing confinement and imposing fines for residency violations, which contribute to abuse. The Convention Concerning Decent Work for Domestic Workers, which the International Labour Organization adopted in June 2011 with Jordan's support, could change that. Human Rights Watch calls on Jordan to promptly ratify and implement the convention by changing laws and practices that restrict MDWs freedom of movement, such as clauses sanctioning their confinement in the house, and blocking them from returning home unless they pay fines. Labor inspectors should investigate and fine employers who violate Jordan's labor code and prosecutors should more forcefully pursue cases of forced labor for exploitation."--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
xvii, 222 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
  • 1. The Historical Legal and Political Context of the Right to Water 2. The Human Right to Water - Legal Status and Normative Content 3. Obligations Correlative to the Right to Water 4. The Right to Water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (West Bank) Part 1: International Legal Sources 5. The Right to Water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (West Bank) Part 6: Bilateral and Domestic Legal Sources 6. The Right to Water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (West Bank) Part 3: A Case Study in the Southern West Bank 7. Where do we go from here? Conclusions and Recommendations for developing the Right to Water.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415577861 20160605
The Human Right to Water and Its Application in the Occupied Palestinian Territories provides an overview and examination of the human right to water as determined under international human rights law. This is a highly topical issue, with the UN General Assembly having passed a resolution which declares access to clean water and sanitation a human right (New York, Jul 28 2010), the recent appointment of the UN Independent Expert on the issue of human rights obligations related to access to safe drinking water and sanitation, and movement within the NGO community for an international water treaty. Amanda Cahill Ripley analyses the current legal status, substantive content, and obligations correlative to the right, and examines the relationship between other economic, social and cultural rights related to the right to water. The book goes on to look more specifically at the application of the human right to water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Using innovative methodology, Cahill Ripley combines legal analysis with a qualitative social science empirical case study to explore the enjoyment of the right 'on the ground'. The wider implications of the case study findings are then considered, looking at what can be done to strengthen the right legally in terms of its status and codification, and what remedy can be found for violations of the right, both specifically in the Occupied Palestinian Territories and in a more general context. The book will be of interest to students, academics and practitioners within the fields of international human rights law and international humanitarian law, as well as those concerned with international relations and conflict resolution within Israel/Palestine and the wider Middle East region.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415577861 20160605
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvii, 222 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • 1. The Historical Legal and Political Context of the Right to Water 2. The Human Right to Water - Legal Status and Normative Content 3. Obligations Correlative to the Right to Water 4. The Right to Water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (West Bank) Part 1: International Legal Sources 5. The Right to Water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (West Bank) Part 6: Bilateral and Domestic Legal Sources 6. The Right to Water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (West Bank) Part 3: A Case Study in the Southern West Bank 7. Where do we go from here? Conclusions and Recommendations for developing the Right to Water.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415577861 20160605
The Human Right to Water and Its Application in the Occupied Palestinian Territories provides an overview and examination of the human right to water as determined under international human rights law. This is a highly topical issue, with the UN General Assembly having passed a resolution which declares access to clean water and sanitation a human right (New York, Jul 28 2010), the recent appointment of the UN Independent Expert on the issue of human rights obligations related to access to safe drinking water and sanitation, and movement within the NGO community for an international water treaty. Amanda Cahill Ripley analyses the current legal status, substantive content, and obligations correlative to the right, and examines the relationship between other economic, social and cultural rights related to the right to water. The book goes on to look more specifically at the application of the human right to water in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Using innovative methodology, Cahill Ripley combines legal analysis with a qualitative social science empirical case study to explore the enjoyment of the right 'on the ground'. The wider implications of the case study findings are then considered, looking at what can be done to strengthen the right legally in terms of its status and codification, and what remedy can be found for violations of the right, both specifically in the Occupied Palestinian Territories and in a more general context. The book will be of interest to students, academics and practitioners within the fields of international human rights law and international humanitarian law, as well as those concerned with international relations and conflict resolution within Israel/Palestine and the wider Middle East region.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415577861 20160605
Green Library
Book
111 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
47 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Petitions through Yesh Din against the non-enforcement of demolition orders and infiltrator eviction orders
  • Violation of interim orders
  • The State's conduct in petitions : foot dragging and retroactive legalization
  • Conclusion.
Illegal construction in the settlements and outposts in the West Bank has been compounded in recent years by a pattern of violating judicial orders issued by the Supreme Court to stop it. The orders were issued as part of petitions submitted by Palestinians following illegal construction on their land or on public land. Despite the gravity of the acts and the depth of the contempt they show for the law enforcement system, they are not met with an adequate enforcement response by the enforcement authorities. Besides ignoring judicial orders, the State repeatedly evades presenting its position on the petitions. These delays, along with the failure to enforce interim orders, are often exploited to establish new facts on the ground with the intention of preventing the requested remedy from being delivered in the petitions. Furthermore, the State does everything it can to avoid demolishing the buildings and tries to legalize the illegal construction retroactively by declaring it to be public land (state land) or by approving plans. This report outlines the broad trends in the State's conduct, based on the experience Yesh Din has gathered for more than three years in which it has assisted Palestinian civilians in petitioning the Israeli High Court of Justice to order the state authorities to enforce orders they themselves issued to stop the construction and evacuate buildings that settlers have built on land belonging to the petitioners.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xx, 367 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Overview of the crime and the criminal justice system
  • Administration of police
  • The Palestinian police model
  • The independence of the Public Prosecution Office and its powers
  • The Palestinian Public Prosecution Office: the Niyaba model
  • The Palestinian courts and the judicial process
  • Independence, impartiality and accountability of the judiciary
  • The administration of criminal courts
  • The dilemma of backlog
  • Sanctions
  • The corrections
  • Modern methods of out-of-court settlement
  • Informal justice in Palestine Sulh : the Sulh as a customary mechanism of restorative justice in post Oslo Palestine
  • Empirical research
  • Analysis of the judges' and public prosecutors' surveys
  • Analysis of the police's survey
  • Analysis of the corrections' officers' survey.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
351 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
165 p. ; 28 cm.
"Israel's settlements in the occupied West Bank, including East Jerusalem, are widely viewed as illegal under international humanitarian law, which prohibits the occupying power from transferring its civilian population into the territories it occupies. This report focuses on the less-discussed aspect of Israeli laws and policies in the West Bank that discriminate against the Palestinian population in favor of settlers. Based on case studies that compare Israeli settlements with next-door Palestinian communities in six areas of the West Bank, this report shows that Israel operates a two-tier system for the two populations in areas under its exclusive control--'Area C' and East Jerusalem; it provides preferential services, development and benefits for Jewish settlers, while imposing harsh conditions on Palestinians. The report highlights Israeli practices the only discernible purposes of which appear to be promoting life in the settlements while in many instances stifling growth in Palestinian communities and even forcibly displacing Palestinian residents. Israeli policies control many aspects of the day-to-day life of Palestinians who live in Area C and East Jerusalem. Those policies often have no conceivable security justification for the harms they cause--such as denying access to electricity, water and roads, rejecting building permit applications for houses, schools, clinics and infrastructure, and demolishing homes and even entire communities. By contrast, Israeli policies, such as substantial government financial incentives, promote Jewish settlements and encourage them to expand in 'Area C' of the West Bank and East Jerusalem, often using land and other resources that are effectively barred to Palestinians. In some cases, Israel's discriminatory policies have forcibly displaced Palestinians from the same areas where settlements have encroached. Such different treatment, on the basis of race, ethnicity and national origin and not narrowly tailored to meet genuine security or other legitimate goals, is not justifiable and therefore violates the fundamental prohibition against discrimination under human rights law. The report calls on Israel to cease its discriminatory practices immediately, quite apart from its independent legal obligation to cease its support for settlements and to remove settlers from the West Bank. The report also calls on other countries and businesses to avoid supporting Israeli settlement policies that are inherently discriminatory and violate international law."--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
60 p. ; 27 cm.
Green Library
Book
56 p. ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
viii, 205 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Part I The Pursuit of Legitimacy in Jordan: Introduction and description of the Jordanian system-- Theoretical approach of the study-- Dual legal systems.-- Part II Laws and Legal Changes: Criminal law-- nationality law-- Divorce-- Protected spaces: the parliamentary quota and women in the military.-- Part III Developing Institutions: Maintaining Legitimacy: The women's movement-- Government institutions and policy frameworksI Conclusions-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754675877 20160527
Through an examination of criminal law, nationality law, and administrative regulations and policies, "Law in the Service of Legitimacy" demonstrates how the state uses the legal system as a legitimation tool, incorporating traditional social practices in order to maintain the support of certain elements of society while at the same time taking measures that counter traditional practices and extend new rights and roles to women. Not only does this widen the regime's appeal to various audiences, but it allows the state to mobilize either rationale - protecting tradition or developing democracy - in support of its policy objectives. This is one of the key reasons for the stability of the Jordanian regime, as well as one of the chief factors explaining the character and pace of Jordanian democratization, or the lack thereof. Using gender and law in the political system of Jordan as a means of investigating broader issues of the relationship between culture and political legitimacy, author Catherine Warrick offers an in-depth treatment of laws that define, limit and expand women's rights, and links the study of women's rights to broad political questions while focusing on law as a full and functioning part of the political system. She argues that gender issues aren't simply a 'special topic' in politics, but an indicator and symbol of the character of the political system as a whole. Thus the significance of the politics of legitimacy as played out in issues of gender and law is not only about the content of policies and competition of interests, but about the power to determine the nature of the political system itself.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754675877 20160527
Green Library
Book
viii, 205 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Theoretical and conceptual issues
  • Dual legal systems and the basis of law in Jordan
  • Criminal law
  • Nationality law
  • Women's access to divorce : religious law as a basis for improved rights
  • Protected spaces : the presence of women in the institutions of state power
  • The women's movement
  • Government institutions and policy frameworks
  • Conclusions.
Through an examination of criminal law, nationality law, and administrative regulations and policies, "Law in the Service of Legitimacy" demonstrates how the state uses the legal system as a legitimation tool, incorporating traditional social practices in order to maintain the support of certain elements of society while at the same time taking measures that counter traditional practices and extend new rights and roles to women. Not only does this widen the regime's appeal to various audiences, but it allows the state to mobilize either rationale - protecting tradition or developing democracy - in support of its policy objectives. This is one of the key reasons for the stability of the Jordanian regime, as well as one of the chief factors explaining the character and pace of Jordanian democratization, or the lack thereof. Using gender and law in the political system of Jordan as a means of investigating broader issues of the relationship between culture and political legitimacy, author Catherine Warrick offers an in-depth treatment of laws that define, limit and expand women's rights, and links the study of women's rights to broad political questions while focusing on law as a full and functioning part of the political system. She argues that gender issues aren't simply a 'special topic' in politics, but an indicator and symbol of the character of the political system as a whole. Thus the significance of the politics of legitimacy as played out in issues of gender and law is not only about the content of policies and competition of interests, but about the power to determine the nature of the political system itself.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754675877 20160527
Law Library (Crown)