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Book
xiv, 225 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Shari'a courts in Palestine and Israel : a socio-historical review
  • Shari'a courts in Israel : the legal setting
  • Establishment of the Shari'a court in West Jerusalem
  • The site
  • The cast of characters
  • Organizational routines
  • Doing ethnography in the Shari'a court in West Jerusalem : some reflexive notes
  • Breaking Shari'a courts' monopoly in jurisdiction
  • Shari'a courts' response to competition
  • Forum shopping : where to file a maintenance suit
  • Shari'a courts in Jerusalem
  • Forum shopping between Shari'a courts
  • Israeli Shari'a courts as pluralistic organizations : a new institutional perspective
  • Empirical and theoretical implications.
This book provides an unprecedented portrayal of a lively shari'a court in contemporary West Jerusalem, which belongs to the Israeli legal system but serves Palestinian residents of the eastern part of the city. It draws a rich picture of an intriguing institution, operating in an environment marked by legal pluralism and by exceptional political and cultural tensions. The book suggests an organizational-institutional approach to legal pluralism, which examines not only the relations between bodies of law but also the relations between courts of law serving the same population.Based on participant observations in the studied court as well as on textual and legal analyses of court cases and rulings, the study combines history and ethnography, diachronic and synchronic perspectives, and examines broad, macro-political processes as well as micro-level interactions.The book offers fresh perspectives on the phenomenon of legal pluralism, on shari'a law in practice and on Palestinian-Israeli relations in the divided city of Jerusalem. The work is a valuable resource for academics and researchers working in the areas of Legal Pluralism, Islamic Law, and socio-legal history of the Middle East.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781409472513 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 225 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Contents: Introduction. Part I Historical and Formal Legal Context: Shariʽa courts in Palestine and Israel: a socio-historical review-- Shariʽa courts in Israel: the legal setting-- Establishment of the shariʽa court in West Jerusalem. Part II A Court in Motion: Ethnographic Portrait: The site-- The cast of characters-- Organizational routines-- Doing ethnography in the shariʽa court in West Jerusalem: some reflexive notes. Part III The West Jerusalem Shariʽa Court and the Family Court: Breaking shariʽa courts' monopoly in jurisdiction-- Shariʽa courts' response to competition-- Forum shopping: where to file a maintenance suit. Part IV A Tale of Three Courts and One City: Three shariʽa courts in Jerusalem-- Forum shopping between shariʽa courts. Part V Concluding Discussion: Israeli shariʽa courts as pluralistic organizations: a new institutional perspective-- Empirical and theoretical implications. Appendices-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781409472513 20160618
  • Contents: Introduction. Part I Historical and Formal Legal Context: Shari'a courts in Palestine and Israel: a socio-historical review-- Shari'a courts in Israel: the legal setting-- Establishment of the shari'a court in West Jerusalem. Part II A Court in Motion: Ethnographic Portrait: The site-- The cast of characters-- Organizational routines-- Doing ethnography in the shari'a court in West Jerusalem: some reflexive notes. Part III The West Jerusalem Shari'a Court and the Family Court: Breaking shari'a courts' monopoly in jurisdiction-- Shari'a courts' response to competition-- Forum shopping: where to file a maintenance suit. Part IV A Tale of Three Courts and One City: Three shari'a courts in Jerusalem-- Forum shopping between shari'a courts. Part V Concluding Discussion: Israeli shari'a courts as pluralistic organizations: a new institutional perspective-- Empirical and theoretical implications. Appendices-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781409410522 20160618
This book provides an unprecedented portrayal of a lively shari'a court in contemporary West Jerusalem, which belongs to the Israeli legal system but serves Palestinian residents of the eastern part of the city. It draws a rich picture of an intriguing institution, operating in an environment marked by legal pluralism and by exceptional political and cultural tensions. The book suggests an organizational-institutional approach to legal pluralism, which examines not only the relations between bodies of law but also the relations between courts of law serving the same population.Based on participant observations in the studied court as well as on textual and legal analyses of court cases and rulings, the study combines history and ethnography, diachronic and synchronic perspectives, and examines broad, macro-political processes as well as micro-level interactions.The book offers fresh perspectives on the phenomenon of legal pluralism, on shari'a law in practice and on Palestinian-Israeli relations in the divided city of Jerusalem. The work is a valuable resource for academics and researchers working in the areas of Legal Pluralism, Islamic Law, and socio-legal history of the Middle East.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781409472513 20160618
Green Library
Book
89 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
  • The Mamilla cemetery and the chronology of the dispute
  • The struggle over the symbolic landscape : zionization versus Palestinization and Islamization
  • The waqf in the national-religious struggle of the Arab-Muslim minority in Israel
  • The struggle over the jurisdiction of the sharia court
  • The sanctity of cemeteries in Islam : science, belief, and interpretation
  • The Palace Hotel and other precedents of construction over Muslim cemeteries
  • "what is abhorrent to you, do not do to your friend" : comparative legal perspective
  • "hidden from sight" : the High Court verdict
  • The role of judicial tribunals in resolving conflicts over holy places
  • Conclusion
  • Epilogue.
In 2006 a dispute broke out regarding an initiative by the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles (backed by Israeli authorities) to construct a Museum of Tolerance (MoT) in West Jerusalem. The museum was to be built on a plot of land that in the past had been part of the historic Muslim Mamilla Cemetery, which since the 1980s has served as a municipal parking lot. Debate centred on whether construction of a museum dedicated to human dignity on Muslim cemeterial land was justified. The Northern Islamic Movement and a group of 70 academics and eight Israeli civil society organizations (including rabbis) opposed the project, but their petition to Israels High Court of Justice failed. Yitzhak Reiter presents the public and legal dilemmas at the individual level (an act of insensitivity to the Muslim minority in Jerusalem); at the political level (the right of equal treatment by the state and the right to administer holy properties [waqf] according to religious law and rulings of sharia [Islamic law] courts); and at the universal level (can conflict over a holy place be addressed objectively from the ideological/political positions that the place symbolizes, and is a secular civil court competent/appropriate to adjudicate a religious conflict). Research for this book integrates a multi-disciplinary approach involving history, identity politics, and conflict resolution. Sources include documents obtained from the Sharia Court of Jerusalem and Israels High Court of Justice, as well as Islamic law and Israeli civil law literature, reports of experts submitted to the courts, and personal participation of the author, including discussions with key players and informants. The Mamilla dispute reflects a microcosm of conflicts over religious and national symbols of cultural heritage as well as Jewish majorityArab minority tensions within Israel.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781845196615 20160616
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (199 pages)
In 2006 a dispute broke out regarding an initiative by the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles (backed by Israeli authorities) to construct a Museum of Tolerance (MoT) in West Jerusalem. The museum was to be built on a plot of land that in the past had been part of the historic Muslim Mamilla Cemetery, which since the 1980s has served as a municipal parking lot. Debate centred on whether construction of a museum dedicated to human dignity on Muslim cemeterial land was justified. The Northern Islamic Movement and a group of 70 academics and eight Israeli civil society organizations (including rabbis) opposed the project, but their petition to Israels High Court of Justice failed. Yitzhak Reiter presents the public and legal dilemmas at the individual level (an act of insensitivity to the Muslim minority in Jerusalem); at the political level (the right of equal treatment by the state and the right to administer holy properties [waqf] according to religious law and rulings of sharia [Islamic law] courts); and at the universal level (can conflict over a holy place be addressed objectively from the ideological/political positions that the place symbolizes, and is a secular civil court competent/appropriate to adjudicate a religious conflict). Research for this book integrates a multi-disciplinary approach involving history, identity politics, and conflict resolution. Sources include documents obtained from the Sharia Court of Jerusalem and Israels High Court of Justice, as well as Islamic law and Israeli civil law literature, reports of experts submitted to the courts, and personal participation of the author, including discussions with key players and informants. The Mamilla dispute reflects a microcosm of conflicts over religious and national symbols of cultural heritage as well as Jewish majorityArab minority tensions within Israel.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781845196554 20180530
Book
440 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
461 p. : facsim., maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
41 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
854 p.
This work is a critical edition of the legal treatise by John of Ibelin, count of Jaffa and Ascalon (died 1266). His work describes in detail the procedures of the High Court of the kingdom of Jerusalem, and the law as administered there.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004131798 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
33 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
139 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
12 p.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
43 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 114 p. : map ; 25 cm.
  • The structure under Muslim and non-Muslim rule-- the judiciary - Shari'a courts-- pious endowments-- resources of Islamic activity - assets, budgets, services and employees-- economic development of waqf properties-- holy places. Figure 1: organizational structure - holy places and Islamic affairs council.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789041103826 20160528
This publication deals with Islamic activity and Islamic institutions in East Jerusalem under Jordanian and Israeli rule from 1948 until after the peace accords between Israel, the PLO and Jordan. After the Israeli takeover of East Jerusalem in 1967 Islamic institutions remained Jordanian organs. This study elaborates on the strategy adopted by the Palestinians of establishing a local Palestinian Supreme Muslim Authority serving as a political body to handle Palestinian religious and national debate for the future of Jerusalem. One of the features of this debate is the Jordanian - Palestinian - Israeli competence over the holy places in Jerusalem. The "waqf" (pious endowments) institution, which is in decline in many Muslim countries, has been revived under Israeli rule. The economic resources of the waqf have been mobilized for the political struggle and it serves as a means of preserving the Islamic character of East Jerusalem and of strengthening the Muslim Arab population's attachment to Islamic institutions. This study focuses on the role of the "Shari'a" (Islamic law) Courts in various mechanisms which were developed to facilitate the adaptation of the traditional Islamic institutions to modern conditions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789041103826 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
126 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
38 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xviii, 251 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
  • Part 1: the struggle over Waqf supervision - late Ottoman precedents-- the mandatory government and the Waqf. Part 2: founders and properties-- beneficiaries and the devolution of shares. Part 3: the appointment of Mutawallis-- current Waqf administration-- transactions and economic development. Part 4: supervision of Waqfs. Summary and conclusion-- bibliography-- map of Jerusalem at the end of the Mandatory Period.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714646701 20160527
The Waqf (pious endowment in Islam) fulfilled vital political, social and economic functions. Reiter presents a picture of the role of Islam in mandatory Je.0rusalem through the resources of the Waqf. The Waqfs, as owners of 80 per cent of the land in the old city of Jerusalem, and their socio-political influence, lie at the root of the present debate about the character and future of this Holy City. The prevalent image of institutionalized corruption within the Waqf system, involving beneficiaries, administrators and members of the elite is not completely supported by the findings ofthe present study.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714646701 20160527
Green Library
Book
v. ; 29 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
21 p. ; 21 cm.
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