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Book
217 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xviii, 1322 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Preface / Emmanuel Gaillard
  • Arbitration in its legislative context
  • Arab laws and practice of arbitration
  • Freedom of the parties
  • Autonomy of the international arbitrator
  • Safety within arbitration
  • Safety of international arbitration
  • Conclusion.
Arbitration and International Trade in the Arab Countries by Nathalie Najjar is masterful compendium of arbitration law in the Arab countries. A true study of comparative law in the purest sense of the term, the work puts into perspective the solutions retained in the various laws concerned and highlights both their convergences and divergences. Focusing on the laws of sixteen States, the author examines international trade arbitration in the MENA region and assesses the value of these solutions in a way that seeks to guide a practice which remains extraordinarily heterogeneous. The book provides an analysis of a large number of legal sources, court decisions as well as a presentation of the attitude of the courts towards arbitration in the States studied. Traditional and modern sources of international arbitration are examined through the prism of the two requirements of international trade, freedom and safety, the same prism through which the whole law of arbitration is studied. The book thus constitutes an indispensable guide to any arbitration specialist called to work with the Arab countries, both as a practitioner and as a theoretician.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004357471 20180530
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 340 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Marriage and the family between religion and empire in late antiquity
  • Christianizing marriage under early Islam
  • Forming households and forging religious boundaries in the abbasid caliphate
  • The ancient roots and Islamic milieu of Syriac family law
  • Islamic institutions, ecclesiastical justice, and the practical shape of Christian communities
  • Can Christians marry their cousins? : kinship, legal reasoning, and Islamic intellectual culture
  • The many wives of Ahona : Christian polygamy in Islamic society
  • Interreligious marriage and the multiconfessional social order
  • "Christian Shariʻah" in confrontation and accommodation with Islamic law in the later medieval period
  • Conclusion : Christians and Christian law in the making of the medieval Islamic empire.
In the conventional historical narrative, the medieval Middle East was composed of autonomous religious traditions, each with distinct doctrines, rituals, and institutions. Outside the world of theology, however, and beyond the walls of the mosque or the church, the multireligious social order of the medieval Islamic empire was complex and dynamic. Peoples of different faiths-Sunnis, Shiites, Christians, Jews, and others-interacted with each other in city streets, marketplaces, and even shared households, all under the rule of the Islamic caliphate. Laypeople of different confessions marked their religious belonging through fluctuating, sometimes overlapping, social norms and practices. In Between Christ and Caliph, Lev E. Weitz examines the multiconfessional society of early Islam through the lens of shifting marital practices of Syriac Christian communities. In response to the growth of Islamic law and governance in the seventh through tenth centuries, Syriac Christian bishops created new laws to regulate marriage, inheritance, and family life. The bishops banned polygamy, required that Christian marriages be blessed by priests, and restricted marriage between cousins, seeking ultimately to distinguish Christian social patterns from those of Muslims and Jews. Through meticulous research into rarely consulted Syriac and Arabic sources, Weitz traces the ways in which Syriac Christians strove to identify themselves as a community apart while still maintaining a place in the Islamic social order. By binding household life to religious identity, Syriac Christians developed the social distinctions between religious communities that came to define the medieval Islamic Middle East. Ultimately, Between Christ and Caliph argues that interreligious negotiations such as these lie at the heart of the history of the medieval Islamic empire.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812250275 20180625
Green Library
Book
viii, 340 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Marriage and the family between religion and empire in late antiquity
  • Christianizing marriage under early Islam
  • Forming households and forging religious boundaries in the abbasid caliphate
  • The ancient roots and Islamic milieu of Syriac family law
  • Islamic institutions, ecclesiastical justice, and the practical shape of Christian communities
  • Can Christians marry their cousins? : kinship, legal reasoning, and Islamic intellectual culture
  • The many wives of Ahona : Christian polygamy in Islamic society
  • Interreligious marriage and the multiconfessional social order
  • "Christian Shariʻah" in confrontation and accommodation with Islamic law in the later medieval period
  • Conclusion: Christians and Christian law in the making of the medieval Islamic empire.
In the conventional historical narrative, the medieval Middle East was composed of autonomous religious traditions, each with distinct doctrines, rituals, and institutions. Outside the world of theology, however, and beyond the walls of the mosque or the church, the multireligious social order of the medieval Islamic empire was complex and dynamic. Peoples of different faiths-Sunnis, Shiites, Christians, Jews, and others-interacted with each other in city streets, marketplaces, and even shared households, all under the rule of the Islamic caliphate. Laypeople of different confessions marked their religious belonging through fluctuating, sometimes overlapping, social norms and practices. In Between Christ and Caliph, Lev E. Weitz examines the multiconfessional society of early Islam through the lens of shifting marital practices of Syriac Christian communities. In response to the growth of Islamic law and governance in the seventh through tenth centuries, Syriac Christian bishops created new laws to regulate marriage, inheritance, and family life. The bishops banned polygamy, required that Christian marriages be blessed by priests, and restricted marriage between cousins, seeking ultimately to distinguish Christian social patterns from those of Muslims and Jews. Through meticulous research into rarely consulted Syriac and Arabic sources, Weitz traces the ways in which Syriac Christians strove to identify themselves as a community apart while still maintaining a place in the Islamic social order. By binding household life to religious identity, Syriac Christians developed the social distinctions between religious communities that came to define the medieval Islamic Middle East. Ultimately, Between Christ and Caliph argues that interreligious negotiations such as these lie at the heart of the history of the medieval Islamic empire.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812250275 20180625
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 142 pages ; 24 cm.
  • "Levant" and Levantines
  • The De Rossetti affair
  • Remind him of his responsibilities : the consular era and the mixed courts of Egypt
  • From Italo-Levantine subjects to mixed nationals and Italians abroad
  • Contested debt, constructed identification, and gendered legal strategies in Istanbul
  • Conclusion/epilogue.
Law and identification transgressed political boundaries in the nineteenth-century Levant. Over the course of the century, Italo-Levantines- elite and common- exercisedã a strategy ofã resilient hybridity whereby an unintentional form of legal imperialism took root in Egypt.ã ã This book contributes to a vibrant strand of global legal history that places law and other social structures at the heart of competing imperial projects- British, Ottoman, Egyptian, and Italian among them.ã Analysis of the Italian consularã and mixed court cases, and diplomatic records, in Egypt and Istanbulã reveals the complexity of shifting identifications and judicial reform in two parts of the interactive and competitive plural legal regime.ã The rich court recordsã showã that binary relational categories fail to capture the complexity of the daily lives of the residents and courts of the late Ottoman empire.ã Over time and acting in their own self-interests, these actors exploitedã the plural legal regime.ã Case studies in both Egypt and Istanbul explore how identification developed as a legal form of property itself.ã Whereas theã classical literature emphasizedã external state power politics, this book builds upon newã work in the field that shows the interaction of external andã internal power strugglesã throughout theã regionã ledã to assorted forms of confrontation, collaboration, and negotiationã in the region.ã Itã will be of interest to students, scholars, and readers of Middle East, Ottoman, ã and Mediterranean history.ã It will also appeal to anyone wanting to know more aboutã cultural history in the nineteenth century, andã the historical roots of contemporary global debates on law, migration, and identities.ã .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138714151 20180219
Law Library (Crown)
Book
2 volumes ; 24 cm
  • al-Juzʼ al-awwal. Tashrīʻāt al-ṣiḥāfah wa-al-iʻlām fī Miṣr
  • al-juzʼ al-thānī. Tashrīʻāt al-ṣiḥāfah wa-al-iʻlām fī dawlat al-Kuwayt.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xviii, 382 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Preface
  • Protecting intellectual property in the Arabian Peninsula : introduction and context
  • 'The golden thread that binds' : the Shariah and intellectual property protection
  • Pre-TRIPS and intellectual property protection in the Arabian Peninsula
  • TRIPS and copyright and the nature of compliance in the Arabian Peninsula
  • TRIPS and industrial property and the nature of compliance in the Arabian Peninsula
  • TRIPS and intellectual property enforcement
  • Post-TRIPS and the enforcement challenge
  • TRIPS-plus and 'raising the bar'
  • TRIPS-minus and protection still pending
  • TRIPS anew : and possible future directions.
ã This work examines the endeavours of the Arabian Peninsula States - namely the Gulf Cooperation Council member States of Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar Saudi Arabia and the UAE, as well as Jordan and Yemen as prospective GCC members - in establishing national intellectual property protection regimes which both meet their international treaty obligations and are also congruent with their domestic policy objectives. It uses the WTO's TRIPS Agreement of 1995 as the universal benchmark against which the region's laws are assessed. The challenges faced by the States in enforcing their intellectual property laws receive particular attention. Protecting Intellectual Property in the Arabian Peninsula considers the changing nature of the States' intellectual property laws since 1995. It argues that the decade immediately following the TRIPS Agreement was marked by a period of foreign forces shaping or influencing the character of the States' intellectual property legislative regimes, primarily through multilateral or bilateral trade-based agreements. The second and current decade, however, see a significant shift away from foreign influences and a move towards domestic and regional imperatives and initiatives taking over. The work also examines regional initiatives for the protection of traditional knowledge and cultural heritage, as areas of intellectual property which fall outside the parameters of the TRIPS Agreement, but which are of significant concern to the States and other developing countries, and to which they are giving increasing attention in terms of providing proper protection.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138211452 20180403
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, 282 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Intellectual property rights in the GCC member states : on the 20th anniversary of the WTO and the TRIPs agreement / David Price
  • Intellectual property regimes in the GCC : recommendations to develop an integrated approach to intellectual property rights / Nadia Naim
  • The term of protection of economic rights under the copyright laws of the GCC / Riyadh Al Balushi, Noora Al Lawati and Muluk Mohsin
  • An analysis of the application of the private use exception to computer-based copying in the GCC / Riyadh Al Balushi
  • Parallel imports, trademarks law, and agency regulations : legal uncertainty in UAE jurisprudence / Bashar Malkawi
  • Shariah law and trademark protection in the GCC member states / Lolwa Alfadhel
  • The protection of geographical indications in the gulf countries / Alhanoof AlDebasi
  • The GCC unified patent system : an analytical study / Rawan Al-Louzi and Mohamed Salem Abou El Farag Elsaid Mohamed
  • The protection of trade secrets in Qatar / Mohamed Salem Abou El Farag Elsaid Mohamed
  • Intellectual property protection in the Arabian Gulf : the enforcement challenge / David Price and Alhanoof AlDebasi
  • Traditional knowledge and cultural heritage protection in the Arabian Gulf and Indonesia : a comparative study / Dina W. Kariodimejo
  • Do investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) provisions belong in a Gulf trade or investment agreement? / Amelia Hallam and David Price
  • IP issues in the proposed China-GCC free trade agreement / Lina Zhang and David Price.
"This volume includes a range of topics addressing aspects of the current status of intellectual property (IP) protection regimes in the Gulf Cooperation Council and its individual member states, and aspiring GCC members Jordan and Yemen. It examines the opportunities and challenges facing the GCC in becoming a real union with common, or at least harmonized, IP laws and regulations, while still allowing flexibility for domestic imperatives and interests. IP is a crucial part of commercial and trade activity which the GCC needs to address as a union to maximize outcomes and benefits for the GCC members collectively and individually. Contributions represent an...international interest in Gulf IP, with authors from Australia, Bahrain, China, Egypt, Indonesia, Jordan, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. The volume provides a catalyst for further deliberation and debate on these above issues and other Gulf-related IP issues, as well as a...contribution to the expansion of Gulf studies in the broader context."-- Back cover.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, 282 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Intellectual property rights in the GCC member states : on the 20th anniversary of the WTO and the TRIPs agreement / David Price
  • Intellectual property regimes in the GCC : recommendations to develop an integrated approach to intellectual property rights / Nadia Naim
  • The term of protection of economic rights under the copyright laws of the GCC / Riyadh Al Balushi, Noora Al Lawati and Muluk Mohsin
  • An analysis of the application of the private use exception to computer-based copying in the GCC / Riyadh Al Balushi
  • Parallel imports, trademarks law, and agecy regulations : legal uncertainty in UAE jurisprudence / Bashar Malkawi
  • Shariah law and trademark protection in the GCC member states / Lolwa Alfadhel
  • The protection of geographical indications in the gulf countries / Alhanoof AlDebasi
  • The GCC unified patent system : an analytical study / Rawan Al-Louzi and MOhamed Salem Abou El Farag Elsaid Mohamed
  • The protection of trade secrets in Qatar / Mohamed Salem Abou El Farag Elsaid Mohamed
  • Intellectual property protection in the Arabian Gulf : the enfocement challenge / David Price and Alhanoof AlDebasi
  • Traditional knowledge and cultural heritage protection in the Arabian Gulf and Indonesia : a comparative study / Dina W. Kariodimejo
  • Do investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) provisions belong in a Gulf trade or investment agreement? / Amelia Hallam and David Price
  • IP issues in the proposed China-GCC free trade agreement / Lina Zhang and David Price.
"This volume includes a range of topics addressing aspects of the current status of intellectual property (IP) protection regimes in the Gulf Cooperation Council and its individual member states, and aspiring GCC members Jordan and Yemen. It examines the opportunities and challenges facing the GCC in becoming a real union with common, or at least harmonized, IP laws and regulations, while still allowing flexibility for domestic imperatives and interests. IP is a crucial part of commercial and trade activity which the GCC needs to address as a union to maximize outcomes and benefits for the GCC members collectively and individually. Contributions represent an...international interest in Gulf IP, with authors from Australia, Bahrain, China, Egypt, Indonesia, Jordan, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. The volume provides a catalyst for further deliberation and debate on these above issues and other Gulf-related IP issues, as well as a...contribution to the expansion of Gulf studies in the broader context."-- Back cover.
Green Library
Book
639 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
400 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
li, 294 pages ; 26 cm.
  • International investment law
  • Lex petrolea
  • Iran
  • Iraq
  • Saudi Arabia.
Lex Petrolea and International Investment Law: Law and Practice in the Persian Gulf offers readers a detailed analysis of jurisprudence on the settlement of upstream petroleum disputes between host states in the Persian Gulf and foreign investors. Dr Nima Mersadi Tabari considers the historical, political, and socio-economic roots of the existing frameworks and levels of protection offered to foreign investors. With particular focus on petroleum-related disputes, he initially delivers a comprehensive survey of the jurisprudence of international investment law and investment treaty arbitration. Following on from this, in three dedicated chapters, the author provides in-depth analysis of the legal regimes governing the matter in the major producers of the region: Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Iran. A key resource for all professionals working on legal issues arising from foreign direct investments in natural resources, this book draws a detailed picture of the legal regime governing the upstream sector in the most important geographical region for the international oil and gas sector.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138656499 20170321
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 187 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Egypt
  • Tunisia
  • Libya
  • Yemen
  • Reckoning with transitional justice
  • Conclusion.
The dramatic uprisings that ousted the long-standing leaders of several countries in the Arab region set in motion an unprecedented period of social, political and legal transformation. The prosecution of political leaders took centre stage in the pursuit of transitional justice following the `Arab Spring'. Through a comparative case study of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Yemen, this book argues that transitional justice in the Arab region presents the strongest challenge yet to the transitional justice paradigm. This paradigm is built on the underlying assumption that transitions constitute a shift from non-liberal to liberal democratic regimes, where often legal measures are taken to address atrocities committed during the prior regime. The book is guided by two principal questions: first, what trigger and driving factors led to the decision of whether or not to prosecute former political leaders? And second, what shaping factors affected the content and extent of decisions regarding prosecution? In answering these questions, the book enhances our understanding of how transitional justice is pursued by different actors in varied contexts. In doing so, it challenges the predominant understanding that transitional justice uniformly occurs in liberalising contexts and calls for a re-thinking of transitional justice theory and practice. Using original findings generated from almost 50 interviews across 4 countries, this research builds on the growing critical literature that claims that transitional justice is an under-theorised field and needs to be developed to take into account non-liberal and complex transitions. It will be stimulating and thought-provoking reading for all those interested in transitional justice and the `Arab Spring'. 'Beginning with the striking image of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in the docks in 2011, Aboueldahab analyzes the role of transitional justice processes in relation to the political developments of the Arab Spring. She makes a compelling case for a fundamental rethinking of those approaches to fighting impunity that have become mainstreamed in the international human rights community; this book also challenges assumptions and theories regarding the notion of `liberalizing' political transitions. Drawing from four country contexts (Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and Yemen) this book demonstrates that human rights goals were undermined because the international community and key national actors ignored the socio-legal histories that shaped the paths and horizons of political change. This book is an important contribution to the study of international criminal law, transitional justice, and the broader field of political transition.' Vasuki Nesiah, Associate Professor of Practice, New York University `This very timely and perceptive study provides rigorous empirical evaluation of the post-transition prosecution strategies in the Arab region. It demonstrates both the complexity of and contrasts between the cases, but also highlights their divergence from the transitional justice field as it is generally understood. By exploring the broader political shifts and the local political dynamics of prosecutions, Noha Aboueldahab challenges common misconceptions about whose interests prosecutions serve in these contexts. In doing so, she questions the assumptions of transitional justice more broadly.' Hugo van der Merwe, Director of Research, The Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Transitional Justice 'In this book Aboueldahab presents an in depth empirical analysis of the dynamics of transitional justice in the Arab spring. In so doing she highlights not only the practical difficulties faced but provides an insightful commentary on some of the core tensions of transitional justice itself. The book will be an invaluable resource for those seeking to understand the successes and failures of transitional justice and its application to non-liberal transitions.' Dr Catherine Turner, Assistant Professor, Durham Law School.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781509911332 20180129
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 321 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Following the 'Arab Spring' uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa, many had high hopes not only for democratisation but also for transitional justice to address the myriad abuses that had taken place in the region, both during the uprisings and for decades prior to them. Protesters had called not only for removal of corrupt and abusive leaders, but also for the protection of human rights more generally, including socio-economic rights as well as civil and political rights. Despite these hopes, most of the transitions in the region have stalled, along with the possibility of transitional justice. This volume is the first to look at this process and brings together leading experts in the fields of human rights and transitional justice, and in the history, politics and justice systems of countries such as Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Algeria, Bahrain and Morocco. While these countries have diverse histories, political institutions, and experiences with accountability, most have experienced non-transition, stalled transition, or political manipulation of transitional justice measures, highlight--ing the limits of such mechanisms. These studies should inform reflection not only on the role of transitional justice in the region, but also on challenges to its operation more generally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849046497 20170227
Green Library
Book
338 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 311 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Building rule of law in the Arab world : paths to realization / Eva Bellin
  • Reforming judiciaries in emerging democracies / Lisa Hilbink
  • A clash of institutions : judiciary vs. executive in Egypt / Nathalie Bernard-Maugiron
  • What independence? : judicial power in Tunisia / Mohamed Salah Ben Aissa
  • Reforming the armies of authoritarian regimes / Zoltan Barany
  • Democracy vs. rule of law : the case of the Egyptian military / Robert Springborg
  • Subjecting the military to the rule of law : the Tunisian model / Risa A. Brooks
  • The military balancing act : cohesion vs. effectiveness in deeply divided societies / Oren Barak
  • The politics of police reform in new democracies / Diane E. Davis
  • Between collapse and professionalism : police reform in Egypt / Tewfiq Aclimandos
  • Dismantling the security apparatus : challenges of police reform in Tunisia / Querine Hanlon
  • From contention to reform : deep democratization and rule of law / Michael Johnston
  • Strengthening governance and fighting corruption in the Arab world / Günter Heidenhof and Lida Bteddini
  • Lessons, challenges, and puzzles for building rule of law in the Arab world / Eva Bellin.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 290 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: New family law codes in Middle Eastern countries : reforms that are faithful to Islamic tradition? / Marie-Claire Foblets
  • Breaks and continuities in Middle Eastern law : women after the 2011 revolutions / Chibli Mallat
  • Contextualizing family-law reform and plural legalities in postcolonial Pakistan / Shaheen Sardar Ali
  • Family law, fundamental human rights and political transition in Tunisia / Monia Ben Jémia
  • Struggling for a modern family law : a Khaleeji perspective / Lena-Maria Möller
  • Between procedure and substance : a review of law-making in Egypt / Nora Alim and Nadjma Yassari
  • The financial relationship between spouses under Iranian law : a never-ending story of guilt and atonement? / Nadjma Yassari
  • Les pouvoirs du juge tunisien en droit de la famille / Salma Abida
  • Divorce in Egypt : between law in the books and law in action / Nathalie Bernard-Maugiron
  • Personal status law in Israel : disputes between religious and secular courts / Imen Gallala-Arndt
  • Marriage contracts in Islamic history / Amira Sonbol
  • Our marriage, your property? : renegotiating Islamic matrimonial property regimes / M. Siraj Sait.
This volume identifies and elaborates on the significance and functions of the various actors involved in the development of family law in the Middle East. Besides the importance of family law regulations for each individual, family law has become the battleground of political and social contestation. Divided into four parts, the collection presents a general overview and analysis of the development of family law in the region and provides insights into the broader context of family law reform, before offering examples of legal development realised by codification drawn from a selection of Gulf states, Iran, and Egypt. It then goes on to present a thorough analysis of the role of the judiciary in the process of lawmaking, before discussing ways the parties themselves may have shaped and do shape the law. Including contributions from leading authors of Middle Eastern law, this timely volume brings together many isolated aspects of legal development and offers a comprehensive picture on this topical subject. It will be of interest to scholars and academics of family law and religion.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472464958 20160822
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxiii, 953 pages ; 27 cm
Constitutionalism, Human Rights, and Islam after the Arab Spring offers a comprehensive analysis of the impact that new and draft constitutions and amendments - such as those in Jordan, Morocco, Syria, Egypt, and Tunisia - have had on the transformative processes that drive constitutionalism in Arab countries. This book aims to identify and analyze the key issues facing constitutional law and democratic development in Islamic states, and offers an in-depth examination of the relevance of the transformation processes for the development and future of constitutionalism in Arab countries. Using an encompassing and multi-faceted approach, this book explores underlying trends and currents that have been pivotal to the Arab Spring, while identifying and providing a forward looking view of constitution making in the Arab world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190627645 20161010
Green Library
Book
xxxiii, 953 pages ; 27 cm
  • Power and legitimacy
  • What basis for statehood : religion or citizenship?
  • What kind of government : civilian or military?
  • The fragile basis of democracy and development
  • Liberty, equality, and the rights of minorities
  • Constitutional courts : new guardians of the constitutions?
  • International influences and interactions.
Constitutionalism, Human Rights, and Islam after the Arab Spring offers a comprehensive analysis of the impact that new and draft constitutions and amendments - such as those in Jordan, Morocco, Syria, Egypt, and Tunisia - have had on the transformative processes that drive constitutionalism in Arab countries. This book aims to identify and analyze the key issues facing constitutional law and democratic development in Islamic states, and offers an in-depth examination of the relevance of the transformation processes for the development and future of constitutionalism in Arab countries. Using an encompassing and multi-faceted approach, this book explores underlying trends and currents that have been pivotal to the Arab Spring, while identifying and providing a forward looking view of constitution making in the Arab world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190627645 20170130
Law Library (Crown)
Book
342 pages : map ; 24 cm.
  • Algérie : la réalité derrière les apparences -- L'Arabie saoudite : un État de droit islamique -- Bahreïn : la Constitution aux risques des identités -- Les Comores, un fédéralisme difficile -- La Constitution de Djibouti -- La Constitution égyptienne -- Constitution de la Fédération des Émirats arabes unis -- Irak : la Constitution d'une nation éclatée -- La Constitution de Jordanie -- Le Koweït et l'équilibre des pouvoirs -- La Constitution du Liban -- Une constitution pour reconstruire la Libye -- Le Maroc ou l'équilibre monarchique -- La Mauritanie : une constitution présidentialisée -- Le sultanat d'Oman -- Le processus constitutionnel palestinien -- Qatar, un micro-État atypique -- La Somalie : fédéralisme ou séparatisme ? -- Les constitutions soudanaises -- La Syrie : des coups d'État à la guerre civile -- La Constitution de la République de Tunisie du 27 janvier 2014 -- Le Yémen à la recherche d'un État.
"L'intérêt de réfléchir aux changements politiques et institutionnels dans te monde arabe, après la phase d'agitation que certains ont cru pouvoir appeler "printemps arabe", est manifeste. Depuis 2011, du Maghreb au Golfe arabe, peu de pays ont échappé à des évolutions qui ont souvent conduit à des bouleversements juridiques, notamment constitutionnels. Au regard des enjeux posés par ces évolutions, l'optique d'un ouvrage consacré aux constitutions de ces pays ne pouvait être strictement juridique, l'approche devant embrasser les champs plus vastes de la géopolitique. Le présent ouvrage propose donc un état des lieux et une réflexion sur les évolutions (ou les non-évolutions) de chacun des 22 États membres de la Ligue arabe. Au rappel des principales dispositions constitutionnelles s'ajoutent une présentation du cadre politique, une analyse de la pratique institutionnelle et un bilan des avancées ou des blocages que l'on peut constater, voire, dans certains pays, des situations de crise conduisant à bafouer l'État de droit ou à le caricaturer. Par ailleurs, la réflexion porte sur les questions récurrentes des libertés fondamentales, de la place de la religion ou de la condition de la femme."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)