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Book
xviii, 1097 pages : illustration, maps ; 25 cm.
  • The treaties with Byzantium : the Zakon Russkii
  • The Russkaia Pravda or Russian law
  • The Russkaia Pravda : the expanded Pravda
  • Princely statutes
  • Treaties
  • Town and provincial charters
  • The Code (Sudebnik) of Ivan III of 1497
  • Foreign laws
  • Non-legislative (non-normative) legal sources : Gramoty
  • Setting the stage : territory and tribes in early Kievan Russia
  • The Prince in medieval Russia
  • The Prince's government
  • The towns
  • Novgorod and Pskov
  • Western Russia
  • Rural Russia
  • The individual and the family
  • The individual as a legal actor
  • The church and monasteries
  • Courts and justice
  • The Code (Sudebnik) of Ivan IV of 1550
  • The Stoglav
  • The codes of 1589 and 1606-1607
  • The statute books of the Prikazy
  • Decisions of the Land Assembly (Zemskii Sobor)
  • The Council Code (Sobornoe Ulozhenie) of Aleksei Mikhailovich of 1649
  • The Tsar
  • The Tsar's government
  • Territory and population
  • Local government
  • Criminal law and procedure
  • Civil law : persons
  • Civil law : ownership and obligations
  • Civil law : family law and succession
  • Courts and justice; civil procedure
  • The church, monasteries, and church law.
The beginnings of Russian law are documented by the Russo-Byzantine treaties of the 10th century and the oldest Russian law, the Russkaia Pravda. The tempestuous developments of the following centuries (the incessant wars among the princes, the Mongol invasion, the rise of the Novgorod republic) all left their marks on the legal system until the princes of Muscovy succeeded in reuniting the country. This resulted in the creation of major legislative monuments, such as the Codes of Ivan the Great of 1497 and of Ivan the Terrible of 1550. After the Time of Troubles the Council Code of the second Romanov Tsar, Aleksei, of 1649 became the starting point for the comprehensive Russian codification of the 19th century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004346420 20171218
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 238 pages ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
2 volumes : illustrations ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 178 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Citizenship and a social contract : the drafting of the 1936 Constitution
  • Daily life in Kirov in the 1930's
  • Local realities : the implementation of the discussion of the draft Constitution
  • Validators of socialist victory : the discussion in the local press
  • Popular voices : interpreting citizens' rights and duties
  • Integration, exclusion, and accountability
  • The Constitution, the 1937 elections, and repression
  • Conclusion.
Upon its adoption in December 1936, Soviet leaders hailed the new so-called Stalin Constitution as the most democratic in the world. Scholars have long scoffed at this claim, noting that the mass repression of 1937-1938 that followed rendered it a hollow document. This study does not address these competing claims, but rather focuses on the six-month long popular discussion of the draft Constitution, which preceded its formal adoption in December 1936. Drawing on rich archival sources, this book uses the discussion of the draft 1936 Constitution to examine discourse between the central state leadership and citizens about the new Soviet social contract, which delineated the roles the state and citizens should play in developing socialism. For the central leadership, mobilizing its citizenry in a variety of state building campaigns was the main goal of the discussion of the draft Constitution. However, the goals of the central leadership at times stood in stark contrast with the people's expressed interpretation of that social contract. Citizens of the USSR focused on securing rights and privileges, often related to improving their daily lives, from the central government.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138721845 20180423
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xx, 420 pages ; 24 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 354 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Constitutional overview
  • Red origins : doing justice to Soviet constitutionalism
  • Natal chart : constituent influcence and processes
  • Super-presidents and superpowers
  • Talking shop or governing body : parliament
  • Honour in the breach : rights, courts, and justice
  • Plan to clan : transitions, economic, and social
  • Central Asia constitutions and central Asian difference : the regulation of pluralism.
This book undertakes the first comparative constitutional analysis of the Kyrgyz Republic and Republics of Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan in their cultural, historical, political, economic and social context. The first chapter provides a general overview of the diverse and dynamic constitutional landscape across the region. A second chapter examines the Soviet constitutional system in depth as the womb of the Central Asian States. A third chapter completes the general picture by examining the constitutional influences of the 'new world order' of globalisation, neoliberalism, and good governance into which the five states were thrust. The remaining five chapters look in turn at the constitutional context of presidents and governments, parliaments and elections, courts and rights, society and economy and culture and identity. The enquiry probes the regional patterns of neo-Sovietism, plebiscitary elections, weak courts and parliaments, crony capitalism, and constraints on association, as well as the counter-tendencies that strengthen democracy, rights protection and pluralism. It reveals the Central Asian experience to be emblematic of the principal issues and tensions facing contemporary constitutional systems everywhere.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849462501 20170502
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 534 pages ; 25 cm
  • Part I. Estonian law
  • General frameworks / Tatjana Evas [and 7 others]
  • Public law / Marek Herm [and 10 others]
  • Private law / Edgar Grünberg [and 5 others]
  • Part II. Latvian law
  • General frameworks / Arnis Buka [and 3 others]
  • Public law / Māris Badovskis [and 8 others]
  • Private law / Linda Damane [and 8 others]
  • Part III. Lithuanian law
  • General frameworks of Lithuanian law / Tomas Berkmanas [and 6 others]
  • Lithuanian public law / Marius Bartninkas [and 8 others]
  • Lithuanian private law / Paulius Astromskis [and 7 others].
This is the first book to present the law of the Baltic States in one comprehensive and coherent volume in English. The Baltic States region, which was incorporated by the Soviet Union for 50 years and now is the only such territory in the EU, continues to be characterized by a number of unique traits, problems and developmental trends. This book addresses these facets of law - the status quo, problems and trends - by adopting a comparative perspective structure for all three Baltic States (divided into three main parts - Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania). Each of these parts examines similar core aspects: General Frameworks, Public Law, and Private Law. Taking into account the peculiarities of each country, the individual chapters provide analyses of principles, problems and developments in specific legal branches. The authors of the book are recognized academics and professionals in the field of law. Taken together, their contributions offer a valuable tool and resource for anyone interested in the law of the Baltic States: students, legal practitioners, scholars, administrators, etc.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319544779 20170717
Law Library (Crown)
Book
330 pages ; 23 cm
  • Lever de rideau -- L'assassinat de Kirov -- Le premier coup de feu -- Le meurtrier -- Le baiser de Judas -- Nikolaïev a-t-il agi seul -- Les procès à huis clos de 1934 et 1935 -- Le procès de Nikolaïev -- Le procès du Centre de Moscou -- Le procès du NKVD de Leningrad -- Le Grand-Guignol -- Le premier procès public: août 1936 -- "L'instruction" -- Les Seize -- Réquisitoire -- Les plaidoiries -- Le verdict -- Le procès de janvier 1937 -- Moscou en 1937 -- Il faut des boucs émissaires -- Gare à la cinquième colonne! -- La préparation du procès Piatakov -- Les débats -- La déposition de Piatakov -- La déposition de Radek -- Les autres accusés -- Le réquisitoire -- Les plaidoiries et le verdict -- Le mystère Ordjonikidze -- Le procès des généraux (juin 1937) -- Toukhatchevski -- Des mobiles personnels ou des mobiles de politique étrangère ? -- La rumeur -- Heydrich entre en scène -- La mise à mort et l'hécatombe -- Le procès de mars 1938 -- La complainte de Boukharine -- Iagoda, l'invité surprise -- Staline et le fantôme de son épouse -- La bombe Krestinski -- Les autres accusés -- Le verre pilé dans le beurre -- Les médecins empoisonneurs -- Boukharine -- Le réquisitoire -- Les plaidoiries -- Le rideau tombe -- À l'Ouest: l'indifférence générale -- Une pièce bien jouée -- Une actualité chargée -- La plupart se laissent berner -- Certains applaudissent -- D'autres commencent à siffler -- Le contre-procès de Souvarine et de Breton -- Le Livre rouge de Sedov et le contre-procès de Dewey -- Les contre-procès de Koestler et d'Orlov -- 820 000 fusillés sans procès, 1937-1938 -- L'ordre n° 00447 -- Les voitures noires du NKVD -- Ah! Si Staline savait! -- Les procès de Budapest, Sofia et Prague -- Budapest -- Sofia -- Prague -- Les assassins en blouses blanches.
"Vingt ans après la Révolution russe, les fameux "procès de Moscou" (1936-1938) représentent l'acte fondateur du totalitarisme stalinien. En quelques mois, hauts dirigeants et militants de la première heure sont éliminés en nombre à l'issue de procédures kafkaïennes qui préfigurent les "grandes purges" de 1937 et 1938. Tout commence le 1 décembre 1934 avec l'assassinat de Serguei Kirov, seul rival de Staline en popularité au sein du Comité central. Un mois plus tard, 13 coinculpés en plus de son meurtrier sont fusillés, au nom d'un improbable complot. Ce premier procès servira de matrice aux suivants: accusation de haute trahison, de sabotage et d'espionnage; documents à charge créés de toutes pièces par le NKVD, torture physique et psychologique des prévenus ; orchestration implacable des audiences destinée à les rendre crédibles auprès d'un public trié sur le volet. Il s'agit tout à la fois de se débarrasser de concurrents gênants, de fournir au "Petit Père des Peuples" une mainmise totale sur l'appareil du Parti et d'ériger un paravent médiatique aux exécutions de masse perpétrées dans l'ombre. Enrichi de témoignages et de documents d'archives déclassifiés après la dissolution de l'URSS, cet ouvrage propose un récit poignant de ces procès-spectacles, en intégrant les apports de la recherche historique des dernières décennies."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 256 pages : illustrations (black and white) ; 22 cm.
  • Einleitung
  • Der Anfang vom Ende der alten Ordnung
  • Neuordnung
  • Repräsentationen des Rechts
  • Recht und Un-Ordnung : Justiz in Zeiten der Cholera, Saratov 1892/93
  • Ein gewöhnlicher Mordfall : Bechterev und die Frage der Schuld, Cherson 1909
  • Der Fall Lopuchin : Die Rhetorik des Rechts im Kampf um politische Legitimität
  • Neues recht, neue ordnung? : Recht, Herrschaft und Ordnung im Wandel
  • Epilog.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
486 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm
Green Library
Book
415 pages : facsimiles, map ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 392 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • The Islamic juridical field of Islamic central Asia (1785-1916)
  • Native judges into colonial scapegoats
  • The bureaucratization of land tenure
  • Annulling charitable endowments
  • Fatwas for Muslims, opinions for Russians.
Visions of Justice offers an exploration of legal consciousness among the Muslim communities of Central Asia from the end of the eighteenth century through the fall of the Russian Empire. Paolo Sartori surveys how colonialism affected the way in which Muslims formulated their convictions about entitlements and became exposed to different notions of morality. Situating his work within a range of debates about colonialism and law, legal pluralism, and subaltern subjectivity, Sartori puts the study of Central Asia on a broad, conceptually sophisticated, comparative footing. Drawing from a wealth of Arabic, Persian, Turkic and Russian sources, this book provides a thoughtful critique of method and considers some of the contrasting ways in which material from Central Asian archives may most usefully be read. This title is available in its entirety in Open Access. Publication in Open Access was made possible by a grant from the Volkswagen Foundation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004330894 20170130
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 392 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Note on Transliteration and Nomenclature Abbreviations List of Maps and Illustrations Introduction Chapter One: The Islamic Juridical Field in Central Asia, ca. 1785-1918 Chapter Two: Native Judges into Colonial Scapegoats Chapter Three: The Bureaucratization of Land Tenure Chapter Four: Annulling Charitable Endowments Chapter Five: Fatwas for Muslims, Opinions for Russians Epilogue: The Legacy: Opportunities from Colonialism Appendixes I-IV Glossary of Islamic Terms Archival Files Consulted Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004330894 20170130
Visions of Justice offers an exploration of legal consciousness among the Muslim communities of Central Asia from the end of the eighteenth century through the fall of the Russian Empire. Paolo Sartori surveys how colonialism affected the way in which Muslims formulated their convictions about entitlements and became exposed to different notions of morality. Situating his work within a range of debates about colonialism and law, legal pluralism, and subaltern subjectivity, Sartori puts the study of Central Asia on a broad, conceptually sophisticated, comparative footing. Drawing from a wealth of Arabic, Persian, Turkic and Russian sources, this book provides a thoughtful critique of method and considers some of the contrasting ways in which material from Central Asian archives may most usefully be read. This title is available in its entirety in Open Access. Publication in Open Access was made possible by a grant from the Volkswagen Foundation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004330894 20170130
Green Library
Book
508 pages ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
viii, 387 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Usurers' tales
  • Nobles and merchants
  • The boundaries of risk
  • Fraud, property, and respectability
  • Kinship and family
  • Debtors and bureaucrats
  • In the pit with debtors
  • Intermediaries, lawyers, and scriveners
  • Creditors and debtors in pre-reform court
  • Conclusion.
As readers of classic Russian literature know, the nineteenth century was a time of pervasive financial anxiety. With incomes erratic and banks inadequate, Russians of all social castes were deeply enmeshed in networks of credit and debt. The necessity of borrowing and lending shaped perceptions of material and moral worth, as well as notions of social respectability and personal responsibility. Credit and debt were defining features of imperial Russia s culture of property ownership. Sergei Antonov recreates this vanished world of borrowers, bankrupts, lenders, and loan sharks in imperial Russia from the reign of Nicholas I to the period of great social and political reforms of the 1860s.Poring over a trove of previously unexamined records, Antonov gleans insights into the experiences of ordinary Russians, rich and poor, and shows how Russia s informal but sprawling credit system helped cement connections among property owners across socioeconomic lines. Individuals of varying rank and wealth commonly borrowed from one another. Without a firm legal basis for formalizing debt relationships, obtaining a loan often hinged on subjective perceptions of trustworthiness and reputation. Even after joint-stock banks appeared in Russia in the 1860s, credit continued to operate through vast networks linked by word of mouth, as well as ties of kinship and community. Disputes over debt were common, and Bankrupts and Usurers of Imperial Russia offers close readings of legal cases to argue that Russian courts usually thought to be underdeveloped in this era provided an effective forum for defining and protecting private property interests.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674971486 20161108
Law Library (Crown)
Book
189 pages ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
175 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
2 volumes : illustrations ; 22 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.) in v. 2.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
181 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xl, 399 pages, 2 unnumbered pages of plates : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)