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Book
ix, 333 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • The locations of inscribed Athenian laws and decrees in the age of demosthenes
  • The selective inscribing of laws and decrees in late classical Athens
  • What was the point of inscribed honorific decrees in classical Athens?
  • Some political shifts in Lykourgan Athens
  • Connecting with the past in Lykourgan Athens : an epigraphical perspective
  • Inscribing the past in fourth-century Athens
  • The rule of law in practice in late classical Athens : an epigraphical perspective
  • Proposers of inscribed laws and decrees and the distribution of political influence in late classical Athens
  • Council and assembly in late classical and hellenistic Athens : an epigraphical perspective on democracy
  • Dedication and decrees commemorating military action in 339/8 BC (IG II2 1155)
  • The inscribed version of the decree honouring Lykourgos of Boutadai (IG II2 457 + 3207).
Green Library
Book
xxv, 365 pages ; 25 cm
  • Aristophanes and democracy
  • The number of speaking actors in old comedy
  • Clowning and slapstick in Aristophanes
  • The nature of Aristophanesʹ "Acharnians"
  • Aristophanes and Kallistratos
  • Aristophanes, Lysistrata 277-80
  • The Frogs' chorus
  • Clowning in Aristophanes
  • Aristophanes, Peace 16-18
  • Aristophanes, Frogs 1407-67
  • Aristophanes and Athenian law
  • The Athenian penalty of epobelia
  • Hereditary sitesis in fourth-century Athens
  • Mining cases in Athenian law
  • The Athenian procedure of dokimasia of orators
  • Epikerdes of Kyrene and the Athenian privilege of ateleia
  • Athenian laws about homosexuality
  • The length of trials for public offences in Athens
  • Foreign birth and Athenian citizenship in Aristophanes
  • The Athenian procedure of phasis
  • The oikos in Athenian law
  • The authenticity of Demosthenes 29 (Against Aphobos III) as a source of information about Athenian law
  • Athenian laws about choruses
  • The law of Periandros about symmories
  • The length of the speeches on the assessment of the penalty in Athenian courts
  • Athenian laws about bribery
  • Love versus the law: An essay on Menanderʹs Aspis
  • Hybris in Athens
  • Bastards as Athenian citizens
  • Law-making at Athens in the fourth century B.C.
  • The chronology of Athenian speeches and legal innovations in 401-398 B.C.
  • Unintentional homicide in the Hippolytos
  • Demosthenes 21.126
  • Nikostratos
  • An expansion of the Athenian navy
  • Piso's face
  • Aretē and generosity
  • Gorgias, Alkidamas, and the Cripps and Palatine manuscripts
  • Theagenes of Peiraieus
  • Aigina and the Delian League
  • Leogoras at Hennea Hodoi
  • List of Publications."
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxv, 365 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface Note on Abbreviations Introduction Christopher Carey (Proceedings of the British Academy 172 [2011] 233-48) Part I: Drama and Comedy "Aristophanes and democracy" (in Sakellariou, M. B. (ed) Democratie athenienne et culture, 189-97, Athenai 1996) "The number of speaking actors in old comedy" (CQ 44 (1994) 325-35) "Clowning and slapstick in Aristophanes" (in Redmond, J. (ed) Themes in drama, X: Farce, 1-13, Cambridge 1988). "The nature of Aristophanes' "Acharnians" (G & R 30 (1983) 143-62) "Aristophanes and Kallistratos" (CQ 32 (1982) 21-26) Aristophanes, Lysistrata 277-80 (CQ 30 (1981) 294-5) The Frogs' chorus (CR 22 (1972) 3-5) "Clowning in Aristophanes" (PCA 65 (1968) 30-31) "Aristophanes, Peace 16-18" (CR 15 (1965) 17) "Aristophanes, Frogs 1407-67" (CQ 53 (1959) 261-8. (= "Aristophanes. "Frogs" 1407-67" in Newiger, H.-J. (ed) Aristophanes und die alte Komodie, 364-75, Darmstadt (Wege der Forschung 265))) "Aristophanes and Athenian law" (in Harris, E. M. & L. Rubinstein (eds) Law and drama in ancient Greece, 147-57, London 2010) ã Part II: Law, institutions and oratory "The Athenian penalty of epobelia" (in Harris, E. & G. Thur (eds) Symposion 2007. Vortrage zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte, (Durham, 2-6 September 2007), 87-94, Wien 2009) "Hereditary sitesis in fourth-century Athens" (ZPE 162 (2007) 111-3) "Mining cases in Athenian law" (in Thur, G. & H.-A. Rupprecht (eds) Symposion 2003. Vortrage zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte, (Rauischholzhausen, 30 September - 3 October 2003), 121-40, Wien 2006) "The Athenian procedure of dokimasia of orators" (in Wallace, R. W. & M. Gagarin (eds) Symposion 2001. Vortrage zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte, (Evanston, Illinois, 5-8 September 2001), 79-87, Wien 2005) "Epikerdes of Kyrene and the Athenian privilege of ateleia" (ZPE 150 (2004) 127-33) "Athenian laws about homosexuality" (RIDA 47 (2000) 13-27) "The length of trials for public offences in Athens" (in Flensted-Jansen, P. et al. (eds) Polis and Politics. Studies in ancient Greek history presented to M. H. Hansen on his sixtieth birthday, 563-8, Copenhagen 2000) "Foreign birth and Athenian citizenship in Aristophanes" (in Sommerstein, A. H., Halliwell, J., Henderson, J. & B. Zimmermann (eds) Tragedy, Comedy and the Polis, 359-71, London 1993) "The Athenian procedure of phasis" (in Gagarin, M. (ed) Symposion 1990. Vortrage zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte, (Pacific Grove, California, 24-26 September 1990), 187-98, Koln 1991) "The oikos in Athenian law" (CQ 39 (1989) 10-21) "The authenticity of Demosthenes 29 (Against Aphobos III) as a source of information about Athenian law" (in Thur, G. (ed) Symposion 1985. Vortrage zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte, (Ringberg, 24-26 Juli 1985), 253-63, Koln 1989) "Athenian laws about choruses" (in Fernandez Nieto, F. J. (ed) Symposion 1982. Vortrage zur griechischen und hellenistischen Rechtsgeschichte, (Santander, 1-4 September 1982), 65-78, Koln 1989) "The law of Periandros about symmories" (CQ 36 (1986) 438-49) "The length of the speeches on the assessment of the penalty in Athenian courts" (CQ 35 (1985) 525-6) "Athenian laws about bribery" (RIDA 30 (1983) 57-78) "Love versus the law: An essay on Menander's Aspis" (G & R 29 (1982) 42-52) "Hybris in Athens" (G & R 23 (1976) 14-31) "Bastards as Athenian citizens" (CQ 26 (1976) 88-91) "Law-making at Athens in the fourth century B.C." (JHS 95 (1975) 62-74) "The chronology of Athenian speeches and legal innovations in 401-398 B.C." (RIDA 18 (1971) 267-73) "Unintentional homicide in the Hippolytos" (RhM 111 (1968) 156-58) Part III: Varia philologica et historica "Demosthenes 21.126" (ZPE 99 (1993) 10) "Nikostratos" (CQ 59 (1965) 41-51) "An expansion of the Athenian navy" (CR 15 (1965) 260) "Piso's face" (CR 14 (1964) 9-10) "á¼ Ï ÎµÏ á½´ and generosity" (Mnemosyne 16 (1963) 127-34) "Gorgias, Alkidamas, and the Cripps and Palatine manuscripts" (CQ 55 (1961) 113-24) "Theagenes of Peiraieus" (RhM 104 (1961) 229-36) "Aigina and the Delian League" (JHS 80 (1960) 118-21) "Leogoras at Hennea Hodoi" (RhM 102 (1959) 376-8) ã List of Publications - Douglas M. MacDowell Index of terms Index of sources.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472458179 20171218
Douglas M. MacDowell (1931 - 2010) was a scholar of international renown and the articles included here cover a significant area of classical scholarship, discussing Athenian law, law-making and legal procedure, Old Comedy, comedy and law, politics and lexicography. All of these articles, published between 1959 and 2010, bear the characteristic marks of his scholarship: precision, balanced judgment, brevity and deep learning; they are rational and sober accounts of complicated and controversial issues. Many of these essays are virtually inaccessible as they were originally published in celebratory volumes or article collections which are now out of print or difficult to find outside major libraries. This collection of MacDowell's articles will make these works available to a broad scholarly audience, and make it easier to bring this scholarship to the classroom as part of courses in Classics, ancient history, legal history and theatre studies. The volume includes a biography of MacDowell by Christopher Carey based on the testimony of his closest colleagues and personal friends, which was presented to the British Academy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472458179 20171218
Green Library
Book
vi, 216 pages ; 24 cm
  • Collective sanctions on classical Athens / Adriaan Lanni
  • An economic perspective on marriage alliances in Ancient Greece / Michael Leese
  • Assumption of risk in Athenian law / David P. Phillips
  • Rivers, rights, and "romanization" / Cynthia J. Bannon
  • Justice in Aelian's Miscellaneous history / Lauren Caldwell
  • Agency, Roman law, and Roman social values / Dennis P. Kehoe
  • Cui bono? : the true beneficiaries of Roman private law / Thomas A.J. McGinn
  • Libertas and "mixed marriages" in late antiquity : law, labor, and politics in Justinianic reform legislation
  • Afterword / Clifford Ando.
The essays composing Ancient Law, Ancient Society examine the law in classical antiquity both as a product of the society in which it developed and as one of the most important forces shaping that society. Contributors to this volume consider the law via innovative methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives-in particular, those drawn from the new institutional economics and the intersection of law and economics. Essays cover topics such as using collective sanctions to enforce legal norms; the Greek elite's marriage strategies for amassing financial resources essential for a public career; defenses against murder charges under Athenian criminal law, particularly in cases where the victim put his own life in peril; the interplay between Roman law and provincial institutions in regulating water rights; the Severan-age Greek author Aelian's notions of justice and their influence on late-classical Roman jurisprudence; Roman jurists' approach to the contract of mandate in balancing the changing needs of society against respect for upper-class concepts of duty and reciprocity; whether the Roman legal authorities developed the law exclusively to serve the Roman elite's interests or to meet the needs of the Roman Empire's broader population as well; and an analysis of the Senatus Consultum Claudianum in the Code of Justinian demonstrating how the late Roman government adapted classical law to address marriage between free women and men classified as coloni bound to their land. In addition to volume editors Dennis Kehoe and Thomas A. J. McGinn, contributors include Adriaan Lanni, Michael Leese, David Phillips, Cynthia Bannon, Lauren Caldwell, Charles Pazdernik, and Clifford Ando.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472130436 20171106
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, 216 pages ; 24 cm
  • Collective sanctions on classical Athens
  • An economic perspective on marriage alliances in Ancient Greece
  • Assumption of risk in Athenian law
  • Rivers, rights, and "Romanization"
  • Justice in Aelian's Miscellaneous History
  • Agency, Roman law, and Roman social values
  • Cui bono? The true beneficiaries of Roman private law
  • Libertas and "Mixed Marriages" in late antiquity: law, labor, and politics in Justinianic reform legislation.
The essays composing Ancient Law, Ancient Society examine the law in classical antiquity both as a product of the society in which it developed and as one of the most important forces shaping that society. Contributors to this volume consider the law via innovative methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives-in particular, those drawn from the new institutional economics and the intersection of law and economics. Essays cover topics such as using collective sanctions to enforce legal norms; the Greek elite's marriage strategies for amassing financial resources essential for a public career; defenses against murder charges under Athenian criminal law, particularly in cases where the victim put his own life in peril; the interplay between Roman law and provincial institutions in regulating water rights; the Severan-age Greek author Aelian's notions of justice and their influence on late-classical Roman jurisprudence; Roman jurists' approach to the contract of mandate in balancing the changing needs of society against respect for upper-class concepts of duty and reciprocity; whether the Roman legal authorities developed the law exclusively to serve the Roman elite's interests or to meet the needs of the Roman Empire's broader population as well; and an analysis of the Senatus Consultum Claudianum in the Code of Justinian demonstrating how the late Roman government adapted classical law to address marriage between free women and men classified as coloni bound to their land. In addition to volume editors Dennis Kehoe and Thomas A. J. McGinn, contributors include Adriaan Lanni, Michael Leese, David Phillips, Cynthia Bannon, Lauren Caldwell, Charles Pazdernik, and Clifford Ando.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472130436 20171106
Green Library
Book
viii, 235 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction 1. The Archaic Origins of Character Evidence: From Homer to Classical Athens 2. Incentives for Wide Use of Character Evidence in the Athenian Legal System 3. Greek Ideas of 'Character' 4. Methods of Providing Evidence from Character in Athenian Courts 5. Greek Perceptions of 'Personality' Applied in the Athenian Courts 6. Purposes of Character Evidence in the Courts of Athens - Predominance of Law or Rhetoric? Conclusions.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472483690 20170220
There has been much debate in scholarship over the factors determining the outcome of legal hearings in classical Athens. Specifically, there is divergence regarding the extent to which judicial panels were influenced by non-legal considerations in addition to, or even instead of, questions of law. Ancient rhetorical theory and practice devoted much attention to character and it is this aspect of Athenian law which forms the focus of this book. Close analysis of the dispute-resolution passages in ancient Greek literature reveals striking similarities with the rhetoric of litigants in the Athenian courts and thus helps to shed light on the function of the courts and the fundamental nature of Athenian law. The widespread use of character evidence in every aspect of argumentation can be traced to the Greek ideas of 'character' and 'personality', the inductive method of reasoning, and the social, political and institutional structures of the ancient Greek polis. According to the author's proposed method of interpretation, character evidence was not a means of diverting the jury's attention away from the legal issues; instead, it was a constructive and relevant way of developing a legal argument.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472483690 20170220
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
219 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Le Serment hippocratique : famille, religion et droit -- The Hippocratic Oath in Roman Oxyrhynchus -- Contrats et serments dans l'Égypte hellénistique et romaine -- Entre Rome et l'Égypte romaine. Pour une étude de la nourrice entre littérature médicale et contrats de travail -- Les contrats d'apprentissage et d'enseignement relatifs à des esclaves dans la documentation papyrologique grecque d'Égypte -- Un contrat d'enseignement de la médecine du III siècle avant notre ère P.Heid. 111226.
"En dépit des nombreux travaux récents consacrés au Serment hippocratique, l'origine documentaire de ce célèbre écrit n'avait encore jamais fait l'objet d'une étude approfondie. Elle est pourtant mentionnée dès la première phrase du texte : "Je jure par Apollon médecin, par Asclépios, Hygie et Panacée, par tous les dieux et toutes les déesses, les prenant à témoin, de remplir, selon ma capacité et mon jugement, ce serment et ce contrat". S'inscrivant dans une approche interdisciplinaire, le présent ouvrage réunit six contributions présentées lors de la Journée d'étude internationale En marge du Serment hippocratique : contrats et serments dans le monde gréco-romain, organisée à l'Université de Liège, le 29 octobre 2014, où, en confrontant les sources littéraires et documentaires, qu'elles soient de nature médicale, religieuse ou juridique, on s'est efforcé de replacer le fameux écrit attribué à Hippocrate dans son contexte originel : celui des contrats et serments antiques."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
363 pages : illustration ; 24 cm.
  • Autour de l'homo sacer -- La condition de l'homo sacer -- Macrobe et la question du sacré -- Forme et force de l'injonction et de l'interdiction dans les lois divines et humaines -- Les aspects juridiques -- Minos, Cécrops, Phoronée : figures du premier législateur humain dans ses rapports avec le divin -- Le religieux et le droit dans l'ancienne Rome : artefact prescriptif, taxinomies juridiques et tempéraments au rigor iuris -- Formes et fonctions du serment à Rome -- Chez les autres -- Remarques sur la peine à l'époque hittite -- Soleil céleste, Soleil parmi les hommes : la divinité solaire, le roi hittite et leurs rapports aux lois -- La fusion du droit divin et du droit humain dans les inscriptions en vieux-perse -- Ce qu'en disent les philosophes -- Platon : de la divinité des lois humaines -- Les lois des Atlantes et des Athéniens d'après le Timée et le Critias -- Des lois humaines qui tendent vers le divin : l'Intellect actif chez Aristote -- L'utopie, réflexion sur les lois les meilleures -- Dans les oeuvres dramatiques -- Les hommes et les dieux : la loi dans l'Orestie d'Eschyle -- Lois des dieux ou lois des hommes dans Oedipe Roi de Sophocle ? -- Iphigénie en Tauride ou l'avènement du droit logique -- Le scelus nefas dans Médée et Phèdre de Sénèque : ordres du roi, vengeances de femmes et lois des dieux -- Chez les historiens et les romanciers -- L'histoire de Crésus ou la nécessité de la loi -- Loi des dieux, loi des hommes : deux exemples d'ordalie dans les aventures de Leucippé et Clitophon -- Désirs divins, sacrifices humains : du rôle du couple dieux/hommes dans l'élaboration des pratiques rituelles juvéniles civiques -- César et les dieux -- En contexte chrétien -- La place du terme latin canon dans le vocabulaire chrétien -- Les lois constantiniennes sont-elles conformes aux voeux du Christ ? -- De l'Antiquité païenne à l'Antiquité chrétienne, l'amour de la loi fait place à la loi de l'amour.
"Aborder les relations qu'entretiennent les dieux et les hommes, ou les rapports que les dieux ont entre eux à propos des hommes, ou encore les liens que les hommes tissent entre eux sous le regard réel ou fantasmé des dieux, constitue une base de questions très vaste. La dimension juridique des relations existant de manière directe ou indirecte entre les dieux et les hommes offre déjà un champ d'investigation considérable. Cet ouvrage se propose donc plus particulièrement d'examiner si les lois des dieux et les lois des hommes trouvent des points d'accord ou sont antagoniques. Le cadre principal pour ce travail est celui de l'Antiquité gréco-romaine, d'Homère au Ve siècle apr. J.-C., sans exclure pour autant d'autres cultures issues du monde indo-européen, tels les Hittites et les Perses. Il s'agit d'envisager la dimension juridique de la question, tout aussi bien que de se tourner vers une approche pluridisciplinaire historique, philosophique, anthropologique, philologique et littéraire. Enfin, une évolution historique s'est-elle dessinée et laquelle ?"--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
170 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: Written laws in their ancient contexts / Dominique Jaillard & Christophe Nihan
  • Les lois dans le monde cunéiforme : codification ou mise par écrit du droit? / Sophie Démare-Lafont
  • La codification en Grèce archaïqu / Françoise Ruzé
  • Moses and the Greek lawgivers : the triumph of the Torah in ancient Mediterranean perspective / Gary N. Knoppers
  • La codification des lois en Égypte à l'époque perse / Sandra L. Lippert
  • Hiéra et Hosia : Affaires divines et affaires humaines dans le travail législatif des assemblées / Pierre Brulé
  • Sacred law, lawgivers and codification : perspectives from the Hebrew Bible, Gortyn and Selinus / Anselm C. Hagedorm
  • Codifying 'sacred laws' in ancient Greece / Jan-Mathieu Carbon & Vinciane Pirenne-Delforge.
"The present volume comprises various essays that examine the writing down and transmission of laws and legal collections in the ancient world, including Greece, Mesopotamia, Egypt and Israel. Using a comparative approach, the volume envisions the writing of legal collections as a complex set of social, political, economic and religious processes, and seeks to trace a number of the key dynamics involved in those processes. Additionally, the volume gives special attention to the writing down of ritual laws, which are considered here as a specific yet nonetheless instructive instance of legal formulation in ancient societies. In keeping with this methodological perspective, the first part of the volume ('Codes, codification and legislators') discusses the processes involved in the creation of legal collections as well as the relevance of the analytical categories used to describe these processes, whereas the second part ('Writing ritual prescriptions: meanings and functions') addresses issues related to the codification of ritual norms, especially in Greece and Israel. Overall, the volume aims to further the discussion on the writing of laws in antiquity with regard to a number of key questions, such as the relationship between written and unwritten norms, the function of written laws in the preservation and transformation of structures of authority, and the place of religion and rituals in processes of legal codification."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 421 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • PART 1: THE WOMEN -- PART 2: ENVY -- PART 3: POISON -- PART 4: DEATH.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199562602 20160619
At the heart of this volume are three trials held in Athens in the fourth century BCE. The defendants were all women and in each case the charges involved a combination of ritual activities. Two were condemned to death. Because of the brevity of the ancient sources, and their lack of agreement, the precise charges are unclear, and the reasons for taking these women to court remain mysterious. Envy, Poison, and Death takes the complexity and confusion of the evidence not as a riddle to be solved, but as revealing multiple social dynamics. It explores the changing factors - material, ideological, and psychological - that may have provoked these events. It focuses in particular on the dual role of envy (phthonos) and gossip as processes by which communities identified people and activities that were dangerous, and examines how and why those local, even individual, dynamics may have come to shape official civic decisions during a time of perceived hardship. At first sight so puzzling, these trials reveal a vivid picture of the socio-political environment of Athens during the early-mid fourth century BCE, including responses to changes in women's status and behaviour, and attitudes to ritual activities within the city. The volume reveals some of the characters, events, and even emotions that would help to shape an emergent concept of magic: it suggests that the boundary of acceptable behaviour was shifting, not only within the legal arena but also through the active involvement of society beyond the courts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199562602 20160619
Green Library
Book
xii, 421 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • PART 1: THE WOMEN -- PART 2: ENVY -- PART 3: POISON -- PART 4: DEATH.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199562602 20160912
At the heart of this volume are three trials held in Athens in the fourth century BCE. The defendants were all women and in each case the charges involved a combination of ritual activities. Two were condemned to death. Because of the brevity of the ancient sources, and their lack of agreement, the precise charges are unclear, and the reasons for taking these women to court remain mysterious. Envy, Poison, and Death takes the complexity and confusion of the evidence not as a riddle to be solved, but as revealing multiple social dynamics. It explores the changing factors - material, ideological, and psychological - that may have provoked these events. It focuses in particular on the dual role of envy (phthonos) and gossip as processes by which communities identified people and activities that were dangerous, and examines how and why those local, even individual, dynamics may have come to shape official civic decisions during a time of perceived hardship. At first sight so puzzling, these trials reveal a vivid picture of the socio-political environment of Athens during the early-mid fourth century BCE, including responses to changes in women's status and behaviour, and attitudes to ritual activities within the city. The volume reveals some of the characters, events, and even emotions that would help to shape an emergent concept of magic: it suggests that the boundary of acceptable behaviour was shifting, not only within the legal arena but also through the active involvement of society beyond the courts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199562602 20160912
Law Library (Crown)
Book
199 pages ; 22 cm
  • Un procès pour empoisonnement : une tragédie grecque à Athènes -- Un testament de haine au fondement d'un procès d'empoisonnement -- Section I. Une affaire d'empoisonnement devant l'Aréopage -- Section II. Un procès criminel sur fond de vengeance familiale -- "Présomption d'innocence passe conviction" : un fondement du procès criminel au Ve siècle -- Section I. Une incrimination d'instigation à l'empoisonnement -- Section II. Une mise en balance des présomptions d'innocence et de culpabilité -- Section III. Un réquisitoire contradictoire : l'inexistence des preuves annoncées -- La mort énigmatique d'Hérode : disparition ou meurtre prémédité ? -- Une procédure de flagrant délit sur une présomption d'assassinat -- Section I. Une accusation de meurtre sous couvert d'un flagrant délit de brigandage -- Section II. Le procès-verbal d'audition d'un esclave sous la torture -- Section III. Le rôle ampliatif de l'écrit : la preuve d'un crime commandité -- Section IV. Un procès criminel sur fond d'accusation politique -- L'exception de procédure au Ve siècle : une arme de la défense pénale -- Section I. Glotz et Gernet : un double regard critique sur l'exception d'illégalité -- Section II. Une exception d'illégalité fondée en droit : l'absence de flagrant délit -- Section III. Un déclinatoire de compétence de l'Héliée en faveur de l'Aréopage -- Une manipulation des preuves et de la procédure par l'accusation -- Section I. Les variations de l'accusation dans la version du meurtre -- Section II. Une procédure d'exception : la torture d'un homme libre -- Section III. La violation du contradictoire : une torture clandestine de l'esclave -- Section IV. Un faux en écriture contradictoire -- Le meurtre d'Eratosthène : crime légal ou guet-apens ? -- Un plaidoyer de la défense sous forme de réquisitoire -- Section I. Le procès pour meurtre d'un adultère au IVe siècle av. J.-C -- Section II. Une répression de l'adultère confinée à l'espace privé de-Poikos -- Section III. La contre-accusation d'un meurtrier -- L'ombre du doute sur l'innocence de l'accusé -- Section I. Un crime commis au nom des lois -- Section II. La revendication d'un crime non prémédité -- Section III. Un faisceau de présomptions de culpabilité.
"Les grands procès criminels de l'Antiquité grecque nous plongent au coeur d'une société à la fois lointaine et proche de la nôtre. Lointaine, par le statut réservé à la femme, à l'esclave et à l'étranger, qu'ils fussent accusés, complices ou simples témoins du meurtre d'un citoyen. Proche, par les mobiles qui animent les accusateurs comme les accusés : l'intérêt, la vengeance ou la jalousie qui forment encore aujourd'hui le terreau de nos affaires criminelles. Si la procédure pénale grecque peut apparaître souvent archaïque par la confusion savamment entretenue entre vengeance et justice, par le recours à la torture en tant que mode de preuve ou par le droit reconnu au mari de tuer l'adultère, elle est aussi d'une extrême modernité, par la recherche minutieuse de l'intention criminelle, le respect du contradictoire, des droits de la défense et de la présomption d'innocence. Cet ouvrage se propose à travers une analyse critique de remettre en cause les interprétations données par les historiens de ces grands procès criminels et conduit à de nouvelles conclusions sur le sens et la portée de ces affaires transcrites par deux des plus grands orateurs attiques, Antiphon et Lysias."--Page 4 of cover.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 272 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Solon's Law on the Tamiai
  • The Solonian Calendar and Solon's Other Laws
  • The Politics of Being a Sacred Treasurer in Archaic Athens
  • The Tamiai of Athena and Their Duties
  • Athena's Property and Hiera Wealth
  • Hosia Property and the Public Treasury
  • Sacred Property in the Democracy.
Students of ancient Athenian politics, governance, and religion have long stumbled over the rich evidence of inscriptions and literary texts that document the Athenians' stewardship of the wealth of the gods. Likewise, Athens was well known for devoting public energy and funds to all matters of ritual, ranging from the building of temples to major religious sacrifices. Yet, lacking any adequate account of how the Athenians organized that commitment, much less how it arose and developed, ancient historians and philologists alike have labored with only a paltry understanding of what was a central concern to the Athenians themselves. That deficit of knowledge, in turn, has constrained and diminished our grasp of other essential questions surrounding Athenian society and its history, such as the nature of political life in archaic Athens, and the forces underlying Athens' imperial finances. Hallowed Stewards closely examines those magistracies that were central to Athenian religious efforts, and which are best described as "sacred treasurers." Given the extensive but nevertheless fragmentary evidence now available to us, no catalog-like approach to these offices could properly encompass their details much less their wider historical significance. Inscriptions and oratory provide the bulk of the evidence for this project, along with the so-called Constitution of Athens attributed to Aristotle. Hallowed Stewards not only provides a wealth of detail concerning these hitherto badly understood offices, but also the larger diachronic framework within which they operated.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472119424 20160830
Green Library
Book
xv, 272 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Solon's law on the Tamiai
  • The Solonian calendar and Solon's other laws
  • The politics of being a sacred treasurer in archaic Athens
  • The Tamiai of Athena and their duties
  • Athena's property and Hiera wealth
  • Hosia property and the public treasury
  • Sacred property in the democracy
  • Conclusions.
Students of ancient Athenian politics, governance, and religion have long stumbled over the rich evidence of inscriptions and literary texts that document the Athenians' stewardship of the wealth of the gods. Likewise, Athens was well known for devoting public energy and funds to all matters of ritual, ranging from the building of temples to major religious sacrifices. Yet, lacking any adequate account of how the Athenians organized that commitment, much less how it arose and developed, ancient historians and philologists alike have labored with only a paltry understanding of what was a central concern to the Athenians themselves. That deficit of knowledge, in turn, has constrained and diminished our grasp of other essential questions surrounding Athenian society and its history, such as the nature of political life in archaic Athens, and the forces underlying Athens' imperial finances. Hallowed Stewards closely examines those magistracies that were central to Athenian religious efforts, and which are best described as "sacred treasurers." Given the extensive but nevertheless fragmentary evidence now available to us, no catalog-like approach to these offices could properly encompass their details much less their wider historical significance. Inscriptions and oratory provide the bulk of the evidence for this project, along with the so-called Constitution of Athens attributed to Aristotle. Hallowed Stewards not only provides a wealth of detail concerning these hitherto badly understood offices, but also the larger diachronic framework within which they operated.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472119424 20170515
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 226 pages ; 24 cm
  • Contents-- Acknowledgements-- Introduction-- Part I: 1. Informal social control and its limits-- 2. Law enforcement and its limits-- Part II: 3. The expressive effect of statutes-- 4. Enforcing norms in court-- 5. Court argument and the shaping of norms-- 6. Transitional justice in Athens: law, courts, norms-- Conclusion-- Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521198806 20161018
The classical Athenian 'state' had almost no formal coercive apparatus to ensure order or compliance with law: there was no professional police force or public prosecutor, and nearly every step in the legal process depended on private initiative. And yet Athens was a remarkably peaceful and well-ordered society by both ancient and contemporary standards. Why? Law and Order in Ancient Athens draws on contemporary legal scholarship to explore how order was maintained in Athens. Lanni argues that law and formal legal institutions played a greater role in maintaining order than is generally acknowledged. The legal system did encourage compliance with law, but not through the familiar deterrence mechanism of imposing sanctions for violating statutes. Lanni shows how formal institutions facilitated the operation of informal social control in a society that was too large and diverse to be characterized as a 'face-to-face community' or 'close-knit group'.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521198806 20161018
Green Library
Book
xii, 226 pages ; 24 cm
  • Contents-- Acknowledgements-- Introduction-- Part I: 1. Informal social control and its limits-- 2. Law enforcement and its limits-- Part II: 3. The expressive effect of statutes-- 4. Enforcing norms in court-- 5. Court argument and the shaping of norms-- 6. Transitional justice in Athens: law, courts, norms-- Conclusion-- Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521198806 20161018
The classical Athenian 'state' had almost no formal coercive apparatus to ensure order or compliance with law: there was no professional police force or public prosecutor, and nearly every step in the legal process depended on private initiative. And yet Athens was a remarkably peaceful and well-ordered society by both ancient and contemporary standards. Why? Law and Order in Ancient Athens draws on contemporary legal scholarship to explore how order was maintained in Athens. Lanni argues that law and formal legal institutions played a greater role in maintaining order than is generally acknowledged. The legal system did encourage compliance with law, but not through the familiar deterrence mechanism of imposing sanctions for violating statutes. Lanni shows how formal institutions facilitated the operation of informal social control in a society that was too large and diverse to be characterized as a 'face-to-face community' or 'close-knit group'.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521198806 20161018
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiv, 566 pages : illustrations, map, plans ; 26 cm
  • PREFACE -- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- LIST OF FIGURES -- ABBREVIATIONS -- NOTE ON CHRONOLOGY -- INTRODUCTION -- CATALOGUE OF TEXTS -- LOCATION OF INSCRIPTIONS -- BIBLIOGRAPHY -- INDEX OF GREEK WORDS -- INDEX LOCORUM -- SUBJECT INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199204823 20161108
This volume presents the Greek text of approximately 200 stone inscriptions, which detail the laws of ancient Crete in the archaic and classical periods, c.650-400 BCE. The texts of the inscriptions, many of which are fragmentary and relatively unknown, are accompanied by an English translation and also two commentaries; one focused on epigraphical and linguistic issues, and the other, requiring no knowledge of Greek, focused on legal and historical issues. The texts are preceded by a substantial introduction, which surveys the geography, history, writing habits, social and political structure, economy, religion, and law of Crete in this period.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199204823 20161108
Law Library (Crown)
Book
192 pages : illustrations (some color), map, charts, facsimiles ; 29 cm.
  • On a few Sasanian bullae from the collections of the national museum of Iran / Carlo G. Cereti et Zohre Bassiri -- Sasanidische Siegelsteine de P. Horn at G. Steindorf revisité / Rika Gyselen -- The inscription of Abnun and its dating to the early days of Sabuhr I / Ursula Weber -- Documents moyen-perses de l'archive du Tabarestan (VIIIe siècle) -- Court records of lawsuits in Tabarestan in the year 86-7 PYE (737 CE): a philological examination / Dieter Weber -- The legal context of the Tabarestan court records (Tab. 1-8, 10) / Maria Macuck -- Une archive post-sassanide du Tabarestan (III) / Philippe Gignoux -- Two documents from Tabarestan reconsidered (Tab. 12 and 26) / Dieter Weber.
Green Library
Book
xx, 264 pages ; 24 cm
  • Westbrook among the classicists : an unending conversation / by Deborah Lyons
  • Raymond Westbrook and the ends of the earth / by Sophie Démare-Lafont
  • The trial scene in the Iliad
  • Penelope's dowry and Odysseus' kingship
  • Drakon's homicide law
  • Barbarians at the gates : Near Eastern law in ancient Greece
  • The nature and origins of the Twelve tables
  • Restrictions on alienation of property in early Roman law
  • The coherence of the Lex aquilia
  • Vitae necisque potestas
  • The origin of Laesio enormis
  • Codification and canonization
  • Reflections on the law of homicide in the ancient world
  • The early history of law : a theoretical essay.
Throughout the twelve essays that appear in Ex Oriente Lex, Raymond Westbrook convincingly argues that the influence of Mesopotamian legal traditions and thought did not stop at the shores of the Mediterranean, but rather had a profound impact on the early laws and legal developments of Greece and Rome as well. He presents readers with tantalizing fragments of early Greek or archaic Roman law which, when placed in the context of the broader Near Eastern tradition, suddenly acquire unexpected new meanings. Before his untimely death in July 2009, Westbrook was regarded as one of the world's leading authorities on ancient legal history. Although his main field was ancient Near Eastern law, he also made important contributions to the study of early Greek and Roman law. In his examination of the relationship between ancient Near Eastern and pre-classical Greek and Roman law, Westbrook sought to demonstrate that the connection between the two legal spheres was not merely theoretical but also concrete. The Near Eastern legal heritage had practical consequences that help us understand puzzling individual cases in the Greek and Roman traditions. His essays provide rich material for further reflection and interdisciplinary discussion about compelling similarities between legal cultures and the continuity of legal traditions over several millennia. Aimed at classicists and ancient historians, as well as biblicists, Egyptologists, Assyriologists, and legal historians, this volume gathers many of Westbrook's most important essays on the legal aspects of Near Eastern cultural influences on the Greco-Roman world, including one new, never-before-published piece. A preface by editors Deborah Lyons and Kurt Raaflaub details the importance of Westbrook's work for the field of classics, while Sophie Demare-Lafont's incisive introduction places Westbrook's ideas within the wider context of ancient law.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781421414676 20160618
Green Library
Book
vi, 300 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction : transaction costs, ancient history, and the law / Dennis Kehoe, David M. Ratzan, and Uri Yiftach
  • Transaction costs in Athenian law / Gerhard Thür
  • Access, fairness, and transaction costs : Nikophon's law on silver coinage (Athens, 375/4 B.C.E.) / Josiah Ober
  • Transaction costs and institutional change in Egypt, ca. 1070-525 B.C.E. / Brian Muhs
  • Ptolemaic governance and transaction costs / J. G. Manning
  • The cost of getting money in early Ptolemaic Egypt : the case of P.Cair.Zen. 1 59021 (258 B.C.E.) / Alain Bresson
  • The Grammatikon : some considerations on the feeing policies of legal documents in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods / Uri Yiftach
  • The Vivliothēkē enktēseōn and transaction costs in the credit market of Roman Egypt (30 B.C.E.- ca. 170 C.E.) / F. Lerouxel
  • Transaction costs and contract in Roman Egypt : a case study in negotiating the right of repossession / David M. Ratzan
  • Contracts, agency, and transaction costs in the Roman economy / Dennis Kehoe
  • From free to fee : judicial fees and other litigation costs during the high empire and late antiquity / R. Haensch
  • The economic perspective : demand and supply in the reduction of transaction costs in the ancient world / Giuseppe Dari-Mattiacci.
Transaction costs (TC) are the "friction" in an economic system, and their analysis is vital to understanding institutional design and economic performance. Law and Transaction Costs in the Ancient Economy is the first volume to collect specific studies from a transaction cost perspective. The volume offers models of this new way of looking at ancient evidence, and suggests ways in which traditional subject areas might inform problems in contemporary economics and legal studies. After the editors' methodological introduction, the contributors investigate the roles and effects of transaction costs in fourth-century Athens, Ptolemaic Egypt, the Roman Empire, and late antiquity, on the basis of legal texts, papyri, and inscriptions. Collected here are some of the leading voices on TC analysis in ancient history, as well as established scholars , including several who do not usually publish in English: Alain Bresson, Giuseppe Dari-Mattiacci, Rudolf Haensch, Dennis Kehoe, Francois Lerouxel, J. G. Manning, Brian Muhs, Josiah Ober, David Ratzan, Gerhard Thur, and Uri Yiftach. This volume will speak to those who identify with traditional subject areas, like epigraphy or Greek law, and will also demonstrate the value of experimenting with this new way of looking at ancient evidence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780472119608 20160619
Green Library