%{search_type} search results

490 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
xvi, 355 pages : map ; 24 cm
  • Contents and Abstracts1Ottoman Pirates, Ottoman Victims chapter abstractThis chapter chronicles the rise of Ottoman-on-Ottoman maritime violence in the post-1570 period, accounting for its endurance and examining its internal social and political significance for the Ottoman state and its implications for our understanding of Ottoman power and center-periphery relations. Introducing the Ottoman pirate "life cycle, " it explores the connections between "local" and "long-distance" manifestations of piracy and the slippery distinctions between pirate and corsair, positing that Ottoman subjects were the prey that sustained all pirates in the Ottoman Mediterranean and enabled them to expand their operations. Because the Ottoman central administration relied heavily on naval irregulars to safeguard the coasts and provide intelligence on enemy movements, it was forced to balance the demands of law and justice with its security needs and the limits of its political and military capacity. 2The Kadi of Malta chapter abstractThis chapter turns to the Ottoman victims of Catholic corsairs and pirates who were carried off to Malta and Livorno to be sold as slaves and/or held for ransom. It focuses on the Ottoman magistrates (kadis) who, as judge-notaries, as captives, and as official mouthpieces of the Ottoman state, were involved in every stage of the ransom slavery industry in the eastern Mediterranean. From the late sixteenth century to the early eighteenth century, a number of Ottoman judges could always be found imprisoned in Maltese dungeons, where their legal expertise proved critical for preparing surety agreements and ransom contracts acceptable in courts throughout the Ottoman Mediterranean. The phenomenon of the kadis of Malta reflects the essential paradox of the seventeenth-century Ottoman Mediterranean: the inverse relationship between Ottoman maritime security and the importance of Ottoman law as an almost universally acceptable legal lingua franca from Istanbul to Malta. 3Piracy and Treaty Law chapter abstractPiracy was an early and constant subject of negotiation between the Ottomans and their treaty partners, who developed a legal and diplomatic framework prohibiting piracy and establishing the procedures for redress when attacks did occur. Focusing primarily on Ottoman-Venetian relations, this chapter parses the form and content of their treaties (ahdname), examines how their antipiracy provisions were understood, and traces their development from the late fifteenth century to the early seventeenth century, by which point treaties with similar antipiracy clauses had been extended to France (1569), England (1580), and the Netherlands (1612). The antipiracy articles of these treaties were regularly expanded and modified to address new challenges, including how to deal with and defend against the proliferation of uncontrollable nonstate actors, but developments around the turn of the seventeenth century threatened to bring down the entire order on which the treaty regime was founded. 4Diplomatic Divergence chapter abstractThis chapter discusses the political and religious-legal challenge that North African corsairs posed to the Ottoman treaty regime in a post-"Northern Invasion" Mediterranean, and explores the reasons for and consequences of the diplomatic divergence of the 1620s, when England, France, and the Netherlands began concluding treaties directly with the North African port cities. It argues that the legal and diplomatic fallout of a series of Algerian-Tunisian piratical raids in the 1620s and 1630s led to a permanent restructuring of the imperial center's relationship with North Africa. As a result, Istanbul washed its hands of responsibility for the North African corsairs' predations, granting explicit permission to its treaty partners to destroy any African corsairs who threatened them and creating conditions that led to dozens of European punitive expeditions against the North African port cities beginning in the 1660s and culminating in the French invasion of Algiers in 1830. 5Piracy in Ottoman Islamic Jurisprudence chapter abstractThis chapter examines the legal opinions (Arabic: fatwa, Turkish: fetva) issued by the chief Islamic legal authorities of the empire (seyhulislam) concerning maritime violence and explores the implications of their rulings for judges and litigants throughout the empire and for the corsairs based on its margins. Drawing on research in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century fetva collections, the chapter establishes the kinds of legal questions that piracy and captivity posed for the Ottomans and how they were answered as the intensity, frequency, and focus of Mediterranean piracy mutated in sometimes alarming ways. Showing how secular, interstate, and Islamic law were harmonized through fetvas, the chapter lays the groundwork for the subsequent analysis of the convergence of theory and practice in Ottoman courts. 6Piracy in the Courts chapter abstractRelying on Ottoman court records from Istanbul to Crete, this chapter shows how merchants, monks, and mariners, Muslims, Christians, and Jews, Ottomans, and foreigners used the Ottoman Islamic courts, how victims of piracy sought restitution and sometimes revenge. It asks how complex jurisdictional questions were addressed and how the legal theory introduced in the previous chapter impacted the legal strategies of litigants, Ottoman and foreign alike, in Ottoman courts. It explores examples of disputes over ships and cargo seized by pirates, suits lodged by victims against their alleged pirates, privateering arrangements contracted and disputed in court, and prosecutions of alleged pirates. Telling these stories and examining their outcomes, the chapter ties together the threads from the preceding examination of the courts, Islamic law, the Ottomans' diplomatic dealings, and Ottoman administrative responses to piracy. Conclusion chapter abstractThe conclusion recapitulates the book's key arguments, fast-forwarding to the mid-eighteenth century to test the assertion that the Ottoman Mediterranean was a legal space, defined in large part by the challenge of piracy. Recounting an incident from the 1740s, in which Cretan seamen traveled to Tripoli to acquire licenses to attack Venice-with which Tripoli then considered itself at war-it reflects on the path by which Tripoli and the rest of North Africa came to be excluded from the Ottoman Mediterranean legal space, such that neither administrators in Istanbul nor sailors in Candia considered Tripoli truly "Ottoman." It then reconsiders the connections between legal corsairing/privateering and illegal piracy, and the complex roles religion and subjecthood played in fixing the line between them. Introduction chapter abstractIn September 1614, Ali bin Yusuf of Jerba lodged a lawsuit against a Venetian merchant named Nicolo in the court of Galata, a suburb of Istanbul. Ali accused Nicolo of having murdered his son, Suleyman, a ship captain, and five of his son's shipmates in a piratical attack eight years earlier. Ali's claims before the court, and his difficulty substantiating them-for the Venetian pirate had murdered the Ottoman crew to eliminate witnesses (one escaped, but two were required)-frame the fundamental questions the book addresses, first and foremost: who, what, or when is a pirate? The introduction also provides the historical context, surprisingly absent from most studies of Mediterranean piracy, essential to understanding why the period between 1570 and 1720 was one of pervasive piracy.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503602526 20171127
The 1570s marked the beginning of an age of pervasive piracy in the Mediterranean that persisted into the eighteenth century. Nowhere was more inviting to pirates than the Ottoman-dominated eastern Mediterranean. In this bustling maritime ecosystem, weak imperial defenses and permissive politics made piracy possible, while robust trade made it profitable. By 1700, the limits of the Ottoman Mediterranean were defined not by Ottoman territorial sovereignty or naval supremacy, but by the reach of imperial law, which had been indelibly shaped by the challenge of piracy. Piracy and Law in the Ottoman Mediterranean is the first book to examine Mediterranean piracy from the Ottoman perspective, focusing on the administrators and diplomats, jurists and victims who had to contend most with maritime violence. Pirates churned up a sea of paper in their wake: letters, petitions, court documents, legal opinions, ambassadorial reports, travel accounts, captivity narratives, and vast numbers of decrees attest to their impact on lives and livelihoods. Joshua M. White plumbs the depths of these uncharted, frequently uncatalogued waters, revealing how piracy shaped both the Ottoman legal space and the contours of the Mediterranean world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503602526 20171127
Green Library
Book
xvi, 355 pages : 1 map ; 24 cm
  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • Ottoman pirates, Ottoman victims
  • The Kadi of Malta
  • Piracy and treaty law
  • Diplomatic divergence
  • Piracy in Ottoman Islamic jurisprudence
  • Piracy in the courts
  • Conclusion.
The 1570s marked the beginning of an age of pervasive piracy in the Mediterranean that persisted into the eighteenth century. Nowhere was more inviting to pirates than the Ottoman-dominated eastern Mediterranean. In this bustling maritime ecosystem, weak imperial defenses and permissive politics made piracy possible, while robust trade made it profitable. By 1700, the limits of the Ottoman Mediterranean were defined not by Ottoman territorial sovereignty or naval supremacy, but by the reach of imperial law, which had been indelibly shaped by the challenge of piracy. Piracy and Law in the Ottoman Mediterranean is the first book to examine Mediterranean piracy from the Ottoman perspective, focusing on the administrators and diplomats, jurists and victims who had to contend most with maritime violence. Pirates churned up a sea of paper in their wake: letters, petitions, court documents, legal opinions, ambassadorial reports, travel accounts, captivity narratives, and vast numbers of decrees attest to their impact on lives and livelihoods. Joshua M. White plumbs the depths of these uncharted, frequently uncatalogued waters, revealing how piracy shaped both the Ottoman legal space and the contours of the Mediterranean world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781503602526 20171227
Law Library (Crown)
Book
244 pages ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 279 pages ; 25 cm.
  • The notion of the collective dimension of freedom of religion or belief
  • The right to acquire legal personality : a substantive component of the right to freedom of religion or belief
  • The right of religious or belief groups to freedom in their internal affairs
  • Introduction to the case study on Turkey and the general Turkish legal framework pertaining to the right to freedom of religion or belief
  • The right of religious or belief communities to acquire legal personality in Turkey
  • The right of religious or belief communities in Turkey to freedom in their internal affairs.
The right to freedom of religion or belief, as enshrined in international human rights documents, is unique in its formulation in that it provides protection for the enjoyment of the rights "in community with others". This book explores the notion of the collective dimension of freedom of religion or belief with a view to advance the protection of this right. The book considers Turkey which provides a useful test case where both the domestic legislation can be assessed against international standards, while at the same time lessons can be drawn for the improvement of the standard of international review of the protection of the collective dimension of freedom of religion or belief. The book asks two main questions: what is the scope and nature of protection afforded to the collective dimension of freedom of religion or belief in international law, and, secondly, how does the protection of the collective dimension of freedom of religion or belief in Turkey compare and contrast to international standards? In doing so it seeks to identify how the standard of international review of the collective dimension of freedom of religion can be improved.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138691223 20170418
Law Library (Crown)
Book
98, [18 unnumbered] pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
432 pages ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
336 pages ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 156 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: Exploring the puzzle of minority rights
  • Theorizing Europeanization through enlargement : pull and push model
  • Transformative power of the European Union, minority rights and Turkey
  • Changing minority rights of Turkey in 1999-2014
  • Push without pull in 1999-2004 : EU conditionality triggers the reforms
  • Transition to pull without push in 2005-2007 : from the EU to the 'domestic'
  • Pull without push in 2008-2014 : drift from the EU and rule by the 'domestic'
  • Alternative explanations
  • Conclusions and prospects.
The issue of minority rights is highly contested in both member and candidate states of the European Union. Compared with other policy areas, the Europeanization process in minority rights is much slower and more problematic. Turkey, though, differs from the majority of the member states by showing positive development, although admittedly it is still characterised by both accelerations and slowdowns. This book examines how minority protection, as a highly sensitive and controversial issue, is promoted or constrained in the EU's neighbourhood, by focusing on the case of Turkey. It draws on current external Europeanization theories and suggests a rationalist model comprising both the role of the EU and also domestic factors. It integrates two models of external Europeanization provided by Schimmelfennig and Sedelmier (2005), i.e. the external incentives and lesson-drawing models, and the framework of the pull-and-push model of member state Europeanization by Borzel (2000), to derive a comprehensive model for external Europeanization. The book argues that the push by EU conditionality and the pull by domestic dissatisfaction are influential in promoting change. Without one or the other, domestic change remains incomplete, as it is either shallow or selective. Focusing on the Turkish case, the book enhances the theoretical understanding of external Europeanization by shifting focus away from EU conditionality to voluntarily driven change, and by providing a theoretical model that is applicable to other countries. It will therefore be a valuable resource for students and scholars studying minority rights and Turkish and European ethnic politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138639737 20170626
Law Library (Crown)

9. Mirat-ı adâlet [1888]

Book
215 pages ; 20 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 322 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
225 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
6 volumes : facsimiles ; 33 cm.
  • 1. Karar 1-72
  • 2. Karar 73-160
  • 3. Karar 161-356
  • 4. Karar 357-525
  • 5. Karar 526-798
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
136 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxii, 312 pages : 25 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
2 volumes : illustrations ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
168 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 551 pages : illustrations ; 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xx, 415 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 346 pages : maps ; 24 cm.
  • Quantitative approaches in research on Ottoman legal practice
  • Kastamonu : the town and its people
  • The court, its actors, and its archive
  • Court use : disputes versus agreements
  • Dispute resolution in Ottoman courts of law
  • Trial versus settlement : an economic approach
  • Which disputes went to trial? : case-type- and period-based analyses
  • Rules and tools of litigation
  • Economics of litigation : what affects success at trial?
  • Who won? case-type- and period-based analyses.
During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Ottoman Empire endured long periods of warfare, facing intense financial pressures and new international mercantile and monetary trends. The Empire also experienced major political-administrative restructuring and socioeconomic transformations. In the context of this tumultuous change, The Economics of Ottoman Justice examines Ottoman legal practices and the sharia court's operations to reflect on the judicial system and provincial relationships. Metin Cosgel and Bogac Ergene provide a systematic depiction of socio-legal interactions, identifying how different social, economic, gender and religious groups used the court, how they settled their disputes, and which factors contributed to their success at trial. Using an economic approach, Cosgel and Ergene offer rare insights into the role of power differences in judicial interactions, and into the reproduction of communal hierarchies in court, and demonstrate how court use patterns changed over time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107157637 20170313
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 190 pages : facsimiles ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)