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Book
x, 194 pages ; 24 cm.
  • PART I Introduction; The author; The text; Household and family; Land; Offences against life, body or property; Contracts; The Liber legis Scaniae in Danish legal historiography; The manuscripts; Bibliography: introduction; PART II The text; The Latin text with English translation; Antique leges Scaniae; I Liber legis Scaniae; Correspondence between Liber legis Scaniae and the Law of Scania; Liber legis Scaniae
  • the Law of Scania 505 8 $a The Law of Scania
  • Liber legis ScaniaeBibliography: text; PART III Vocabulary; Andrew Sunesen's language; 1. How did Andrew learn his Latin?; 2. Pronunciation and spelling; 3. The vocabulary, syntax and style of Lex Scaniae.
"The Liber legis Scaniae: The Latin Text with Introduction, Translation and Commentaries forms the second volume of The Danish Medieval Laws and is dedicated to the Latin text based on the Danish medieval Law of Scania. Also known as the "Old laws of Scania", the Liber legis Scaniae is ascribed to Archbishop Anders Sunesen and traditionally belongs to the corpus of Danish medieval laws. It was translated from Old Danish in the thirteenth century and until now has often been considered a subsidiary text. In this book, the importance of the Liber legis Scaniae is reexamined and its role in the first redaction of the Danish medieval laws is revealed as far more central than previously thought. This is the first time the text has been translated into English, and both the original Latin and the new English translation are included together. Beginning with a detailed introduction providing key information about the text, its author and its place in Danish legal history, and including a chapter dedicated to the Latin language of the text, this book will be ideal for students and scholars of medieval Scandinavian legal history. It also concludes with an extensive Latin-to-English glossary."--Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, 289 pages ; 25 cm
  • Introduction : the making of law in Europe
  • Part one. Ancient times: Roman law : now you see it, now you don't
  • The creation of Latin Christendom
  • Part two. The early middle ages: An age with no jurists?
  • Lords, emperors, and popes around the year 1000
  • Part three. The later middle ages: The birth of a European ius commune
  • The birth of an English common law
  • Part four. The early modern period: Crisis and reaffirmation of ius commune
  • Crisis and reinvention of common law
  • From ius gentium to natural law : making European law universal I
  • Part five. Modernity: North American developments
  • The French Revolution
  • Part six. The nineteenth century: Codifying the laws of Europe : making European law universal II
  • Codifying common law
  • Epilogue : a market, a community, and a union.
"Tamar Herzog offers a road map to European law across 2,500 years that reveals underlying patterns and unexpected connections. By showing what European law was, where its iterations were found, who made and implemented it, and what the results were, she ties legal norms to their historical circumstances and reveals the law's fragile malleability"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 190 pages ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Roman law
  • The early Middle Ages
  • The late Middle Ages
  • The early Modern Age
  • The Bourgeois Age
  • Common law.
"[This book synthesizes] the evolution of the law in Western Europe, from ancient Rome to the beginning of the twentieth century. It situates law in the wider framework of Europe's political, economic, social and cultural developments...[Chapters] are organized according to the civil law systems and common law systems. Each chapter is built around the evolution of the four sources of the law: legal science, legislation, courts and customary law, set chronologically against the relevant historical context. [The authors] allow readers to understand how the law arose and evolved in Europe as a shared language, of which its different national laws are but dialectal expressions - with the unique exception, perhaps, of English common law, whose peculiarity is likewise due to accidents of history which are themselves explored."-- Back cover.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (xiii, 808 pages) : digital, PDF file(s).
  • Part I. Late Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages (V-XI Century): 1. Law in late antiquity-- 2. Christianity, Church and law-- 3. Law of the Germanic Kingdoms-- 4. The Carolingian and Feudal age-- 5. Customs and legal culture-- 6. Church reform-- Part II. The Age of the Classical Ius Commune (XII-XV Century): 7. The Glossators and the new legal science-- 8. Canon law-- 9. Law and institutions-- 10. University - students and teachers-- 11. Legal professions-- 12. The commentators-- 13. Particular laws-- 14. Local laws-- 15. The legal system of the medieval ius commune-- 16. English common law - the formative years-- Part III. The Early Modern Period (XVI-XVIII Century): 17. Churches and states in the age of absolutism-- 18. Legal humanism-- 19. Practitioners and professors-- 20. Legal doctrine and the legal professions-- 21. Court decisions-- 22. Local law and royal legislations-- 23. Natural law-- 24. Jurists of the 18th century-- 25. The sources of law-- 26. English law (XVI-XVIII century)-- Part IV. The Age of Reforms (1750-1814): 27. The Enlightenment and the law-- 28. The reforms-- 29. The French Revolution and the law-- 30. The Napoleonic era-- 31. The Codifications-- Part V. The Age of Nations (1815-1914): 32. Law during the Restoration-- 33. The Historical School and German legal science-- 34. Late nineteenth-century codes and laws-- 35. Legal professions-- 36. Legal science between the nineteenth and the twentieth century-- Part VI. The Twentieth Century: 37. Law and legislation between the two World Wars-- 38. Law in the second half of the twentieth century-- 39. Some outlines of the new legal culture-- 40. European Union Law-- 41. Heading towards global law?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107180697 20171009
With its roots in ancient Greece, Roman law and Christianity, European legal history is the history of a common civilisation. The exchange of legislative models, doctrines and customs within Europe included English common law and has been extensive from the early middle ages to the present time. In this seminal work which spans from the fifth to the twentieth century, Antonio Padoa-Schioppa explores how law was brought to life in the six main phases of European legal history. By analysing a selection of the institutions of private and public law which are most representative of each phase and of each country, he also sheds light on the common features throughout the history of European legal culture. Translated in English for the first time, this new edition has been revised to include the recent developments of the European Union and the legal-historical works of the last decade.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107180697 20171009
Book
xiii, 808 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface
  • Law in late antiquity
  • Christianity, church, and law
  • Law of the Germanic kingdoms
  • The Carolingian and feudal age
  • Customs and legal culture
  • Church reform
  • The glossators and the new legal science
  • Canon law
  • Law and institutions
  • University : students and teachers
  • Legal professions
  • The commentators
  • Particular laws
  • Local laws
  • The Medieval ius commune
  • English common law : the formative age
  • Churches and states in the age of absolutism
  • Legal humanism
  • Practitioners and professors
  • Legal doctrine and the legal professions
  • Court decisions
  • Local law and royal legislations
  • Natural law
  • Jurists of the 18th century
  • The sources of law
  • English law (sixteenth-eighteenth centuries)
  • The Enlightenment and the law
  • The reforms
  • The French Revolution and the law
  • The Napoleonic era
  • The codifications
  • Law during the Restoration
  • The historical school and German legal science
  • Late nineteenth-century codes and laws
  • Legal professions
  • Legal science between the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries
  • Law and legislation between the two World Wars
  • Law in the second half of the twentieth century
  • Some outlines of the new legal culture
  • European Union Law
  • Heading towards global law?
With its roots in ancient Greece, Roman law and Christianity, European legal history is the history of a common civilisation. The exchange of legislative models, doctrines and customs within Europe included English common law and has been extensive from the early middle ages to the present time. In this seminal work which spans from the fifth to the twentieth century, Antonio Padoa-Schioppa explores how law was brought to life in the six main phases of European legal history. By analysing a selection of the institutions of private and public law which are most representative of each phase and of each country, he also sheds light on the common features throughout the history of European legal culture. Translated in English for the first time, this new edition has been revised to include the recent developments of the European Union and the legal-historical works of the last decade.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107180697 20171030
Law Library (Crown)
Book
313 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Geleitwort
  • Vorwort
  • Einleitung
  • Warum Barbaren Gesetze erlassen
  • Ein Monument der Alterität
  • Entwürfe von Gemeinschaft im 6. Jahrhundert
  • Usurpation und Legitimität : die Neufassung Pippins I.
  • Karl der Grosse und die mystische Autorität des Rechts
  • Transformation und Untergang des fränkischen Rechts
  • Wissen über das Recht der Franken im 9. Jahrhundert
  • Schluss : für eine andere Rechtsgeschichte
  • Anhang
  • Abkürzungen
  • Archivmaterial
  • Quellen
  • Literatur
  • Internetquellen
  • Handschriftenregister
  • Namenregister.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 545 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Introducton
  • Part 1, Weaving the pattern (741-882): Obtaining the pallium ; Bestowing the pallium ; Using the pallium ; Interpreting the pallium
  • Part 2, A well-worn garment (882-1046): Carelessness ; Creativity
  • Part 3, The reformer's badge (1046-1119): A tool of the reform: The ends ; A tool of the reform: The means ; New meanings for a new age
  • Epilogue: The pallium in classical medieval jurisprudence (ca. 1140-ca. 1271): Decretum and decretists ; Decretals and decretalists
  • Conclusion.
In the pallium the medieval papacy created a mechanism of control over the far-flung bishops of the Latin church, a prerogative by which the popes shared honor and power with local prelates-and simultaneously wielded power over them. Contributing to the sway and oversight of the Roman church, this vestment became part of the machinery of centralization that helped produce the high medieval papal monarchy. The pallium was effective because it was a giYft with strings attached. This band of white wool encircling the shoulders had been a papal insigne and liturgical vestment since late antiquity. It grew in prominence when the popes began to bestow it regularly on other bishops as a mark of distinction and a sign of their bond to the Roman church. Bonds ofWool analyzes how, through adroit manipulation, this giftY came to function as an instrument of papal influence. It explores an abundant array of evidence from diverse genres-including chronicles and letters, saints' lives and canonical collections, polemical treatises and liturgical commentaries, and hundreds of papal privileges-stretching from the eighth century to the thirteenth and representing nearly every region of Western Europe. These sources reveal that the papal conferral of the pallium was an occasion for intervening in local churches throughout the West and a means of examining, approving, and even disciplining key bishops, who were eventually required to request the pallium from Rome. The history of the pallium provides an enlightening window on medieval culture. Through it one can perceive how medieval society expressed beliefs and relationships through artifacts and customs, and one can retrieve the aims and attitudes underlying medieval rituals and symbols. Following the story of this simple material object sheds light on some of the ways medieval people structured their society, exercised authority, and communicated ideas and values.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813229225 20170621
Green Library
Book
275 pages : facsimiles ; 23 cm.
  • Palabras liminares / José María García Martín, Ángeles Romero Cambrón
  • Bases para una crónica de la edición académica del Fuero juzgo (1817) / José María García Martín
  • El ms. Holkham misc. 46 de la Bodleian, testimonio del Fuero juzgo: notas para su estudio y propuesta de edición parcial / Ángeles Romero Cambrón.
Green Library
Book
275 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Palabras liminares / José María García Martín, Ángeles Romero Cambrón
  • Bases para una crónica de la edición académica del Fuero juzgo (1817) / José María García Martín
  • El ms. Holkham misc. 46 de la Bodleian, testimonio del Fuero juzgo : notas para su estudio y propuesta de edición parcial / Ángeles Romero Cambrón.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvi, 353 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Gratian the author and biblical exegete
  • Gratian and his book(s)
  • The Bible
  • Gratian the penitential theologian
  • The practice and theory of penance
  • Gratian on penance
  • Critiquing and correcting the scholastics
  • From penitential theology to the canon law of magic
  • Gratian, a theologian of the sacraments and liturgy?
  • Gratian, a sacramental theologian?
  • Gratian, a liturgist?
Gratian the Theologian shows how one of the best-known canonists of the medieval period was also an accomplished theologian. Well into the twelfth century, compilations of Church law often dealt with theological issues. Gratian's Concordia discordantium canonum or Decretum , which was originally compiled around 1140, was no exception, and so Wei claims in this provocative book. The Decretum is the fundamental canon law work of the twelfth century, which served as both the standard textbook of canon law in the medieval schools and an authoritative law book in ecclesiastical and secular courts. Yet theology features prominently throughout the Decretum , both for its own sake and for its connection to canon law and canonistic jurisprudence. This book provides an introduction to and reassessment of three aspects of Gratian's theology: his use of the Bible and biblical exegesis; his penitential theology; and his handling of the other sacraments and the liturgy. The manuscript discoveries and methodological breakthroughs of the past few decades have rendered older accounts of Gratian's theology obsolete. This book reappraises Gratian's theological views and doctrines in light of recent scholarly advances, particularly the discovery of new theological sources that Gratian appears to have known and used and the discovery of the first recension of the Decretum , which differs in significant ways from the considerably longer vulgate text that scholars have traditionally relied upon. In the process, this book also uncovers new evidence concerning Gratian's intellectual background and milieu and provides new insights into the Decretum 's composition, structure, and development. Ultimately, this book does more than just enhance our understanding of Gratian the theologian. It also contributes significantly to our knowledge of Gratian the jurist and to the world of theology and law in which he worked.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813228037 20160619
Green Library
Book
xlviii, 311 pages ; 24 cm.
Gratian's Decretum is one of the major works in European history, a text that in many ways launched the field of canon law. In this new volume, Atria Larson presents to students and scholars alike a critical edition of De penitentia (Decretum C.33 q.3), the foundational text on penance, both for canon law and for theology, of the twelfth century. This edition takes into account recent manuscript discoveries and research into the various recensions of Gratian's text and proposes a model for how a future critical edition of the entire Decretum could be formatted by offering a facing-page English translation. This translation is the first of this section of Gratian's De penitentia into any modern language and makes the text accessible to a wider audience. Both the Latin and the English text are presented in a way to make clear the development of Gratian's text in various stages within two main recensions. The edition and translation are preceded by an introduction relating the latest scholarship on Gratian and his text and are followed by three appendices, including one that provides a transcription of the relevant text from the debated manuscript Sankt Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek 673, and one that lists possible formal sources and related contemporary texts. This book provides a full edition and translation of the text studied in depth in Master of Penance: Gratian and the Development of Penitential Thought and Law in the Twelfth Century (CUA Press, 2014) by the same author.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813228679 20170621
Green Library
Book
xi, 281 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Die Zwangsvergleichsbürgen-Urteile des Reichsgerichts (1910/12)
  • Fortführung einer ausgewogenen Rechtsprechungslinie in der Folgezeit
  • Plötzliche Haftungsverschärfung : Zubehör-Urteil des Reichsgerichts (1935)
  • Fortführung der verschärften Haftung durch den BGH
  • Selbstbesinnung auf eine begrenzte Verwalterhaftung
  • Ausblick ins geltende Recht
  • Zusammenfassende Thesen
  • Anhang.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 300 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. The minor leges part I. Problems, background, lex ribuaria, ewa ad amorem-- 2. The minor leges part II. Saxony and the lex saxonum-- 3. The additional capitularies-- 4. The reading of normative texts: Benedictus Levita and Regino-- 5. The manuscripts of the leges-scriptorium-- Conclusion-- Editions-- Bibliography-- General index-- Index of legal texts-- Index of manuscripts.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107084919 20160830
The barbarian law codes, compiled between the sixth and eighth centuries, were copied remarkably frequently in the Carolingian ninth century. They provide crucial evidence for early medieval society, including the settlement of disputes, the nature of political authority, literacy, and the construction of ethnic identities. Yet it has proved extremely difficult to establish why the codes were copied in the ninth century, how they were read, and how their rich evidence should be used. Thomas Faulkner tackles these questions more systematically than ever before, proposing new understandings of the relationship between the making of law and royal power, and the reading of law and the maintenance of ethnic identities. Faulkner suggests major reinterpretations of central texts, including the Carolingian law codes, the capitularies adding to the laws, and Carolingian revisions of earlier barbarian and Roman laws. He also provides detailed analysis of legal manuscripts, especially those associated with the leges-scriptorium.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107084919 20160830
Green Library
Book
xv, 339 pages : some illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Hintergründe und Rahmenbedingungen
  • Die Implementierung des Nitchehelichenrechts des ALR.
Green Library
Book
x, 180 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Vorwort der Herausgeber
  • Vorwort
  • Zu diesem Buch
  • Rechtsräume und ihre Quellen
  • Forschungsgeschicte und Arbeitsweise
  • Die wichtigsten rechtshistorischen Quellen
  • Methodenprobleme
  • Fachspezifische Arbeitstechniken
  • Interdisziplinäre Ansätze als Postulat
  • Quellen-Kunde.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 180 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Vorwort der Herausgeber
  • Vorwort
  • Einführung
  • Zu diesem Buch
  • Rechtswissenschaft und Raum
  • Raumtheorie : Begrifflichkeiten
  • Synthese
  • Rechtsräume und ihre Quellen
  • Traditionen
  • Überreste
  • Das Problem der Oralität
  • Zusammenfassung
  • Forschungsgeschichte und Arbeitsweise
  • Überblick vom 19. Jahrhundert bis 1945
  • Überblick von 1945 bis heute
  • Neue Zugänge
  • Konsequenzen
  • Quellen und Methoden
  • Die wichtigsten rechtshistorischen Quellen
  • Methodenprobleme
  • Rechtsgeschichte
  • Geschichte
  • Soziologie und Politikwissenschaft
  • Religionswissenschaften
  • Kunstwissenschaften und Archäologie
  • Linguistik
  • Volkskunde, Ethnologie
  • Geographie
  • Lösungsansatz
  • Arbeitstechniken und Perspektiven
  • Fachspezifische Arbeitstechniken
  • Raumerfassung
  • Dynamiken
  • Indikatoren
  • Werkzeugkasten
  • Ebenen des Raums
  • Interdisziplinäre Ansätze als Postulat
  • -- Perspektiven für die Erforschung von Rechtsräumen
  • Zusammenfassung
  • Ausblick
  • Bibliographie und Verzeichnisse
  • Quellen-Kunde
  • Vorbemerkung
  • Editionen im Text erwähnter Quellen
  • Zu einzelnen Quellen(gruppen)
  • Zu einzelnen "Leges" und anderen spezifischen Rechtsquellen
  • Digitale Sammlungen, Angebote im Internet
  • Bibliographie
  • Sach register
  • Personenregister.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
54 pages : colour illustrations ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 291 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Prologue
  • Orientation
  • The structure of dispute records
  • Material questions
  • Formulaic writing
  • The language of dispute texts
  • Roles
  • Power
  • Local responses
  • A view on northern Iberia in the European context
  • Where is justice?
Although it has a rich historiography, and from the late ninth century is rich in textual evidence, northern Iberia has barely featured in the great debates of early medieval European history of recent generations. Lying beyond the Frankish world, in a peninsula more than half controlled by Muslims, Spanish and Portuguese experience has seemed irrelevant to the Carolingian Empire and the political fragmentation (or realignment) that followed it. But Spain and Portugal shared the late Roman heritage which influenced much of western Europe in the early middle ages and by the tenth century records and practice in the Christian north still shared features with parts farther east. What is interesting, in the wider European context, is that some of the so-called characteristics of the Carolingian world - the public court, collective judgment - are as characteristic of the Iberian world. The suggestion that they disappeared in the Frankish world, to be replaced by 'private' mechanisms, has played a major role in debates about the changing nature of power in the central middle ages: what happened in judicial courts has been central to the grand narratives of Duby and successive historians, for they are a powerful lens into the very real issues of politics and power. Looking at the practice of judicial courts in Europe west of Frankia allows us to think again about the nature of the public; identifying all the records of that practice allows us to adjust the balance between monastic and lay activity. What these show is that peasants, like other lay people, used the courts to seek redress and gain advantages. Records were not entirely framed nor practice entirely dominated by ecclesiastical interests.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781409464730 20160711
Law Library (Crown)
Book
54 pages : color illustrations ; 30 cm.
"Non-productive investments (NPIs) are investments which do not generate significant return, income, or revenue, or increase significantly the value of the beneficiary's holding, but have a positive environmental impact. Public support for NPIs is provided by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and national co-financing. This public support often reaches 100% of the total investment costs. The Court concludes that NPI support has contributed to the achievement of objectives linked to the sustainable use of agricultural land, but in a way that was not cost effective. This was because the costs of 75% of the visited projects were unreasonably high. Furthermore, even though many of these projects had obvious remunerative characteristics, they were fully funded with public money. The Court makes five recommendations aimed at improving the cost-effectiveness of NPIs that will be funded during the 2014-2020 programming period"--Back cover.
Green Library
Book
877 pages ; 31 cm.
  • De los instrumentos legales
  • De los asuntos judiciales
  • Del orden conyugal
  • Del linaje natural
  • De las transacciones
  • De los crímenes (isceleribus) y de los tormentos
  • De los hurtos y de los engaños
  • De las violencias y los daños inferidos
  • De los fugitivos y de los desertores (refugientibus)
  • De los particiones, de los períodos de los años y de los plazos (limitibus)
  • De los enfermos, de los muertos y de los mercaderes transmarinos
  • De la prohibición de los abusos (removendis pressuris) y de la extinción de todas las sectas de los herejes.
Law Library (Crown)