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Book
xi, 218 pages : map ; 24 cm
With the heightened interest in Haiti following the earthquake of 2010, and the troubled state of its institutions in the decades before that, the world community has received a barrage of information regarding the country, much of it based on stereotypes and ignorance. This title provides comprehensive bibliographic information on the development of one of the earliest independent countries in the Western Hemisphere, from its colonial past through independence to the 21st century. In both the introductory material and in the bibliographic selections, this bilingual work emphasizes the impact of its colonial "mother country," France, and of its most important "neighbor," the United States, on Haitian constitutional and legal development-- Publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
223 pages, 6 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Introduction
  • Kolera and the United Nations
  • "Judge Him" : pursuing Duvalier
  • The rule of law, political will, and Haiti
  • The Raboteau trial
  • How not to save a country : lost opportunities in the post-earthquake response
  • Beyond the courtroom
  • The donkey and the horse : Haiti and the United States
  • Creating victory for the people.
A cataclysmic earthquake, revolution, corruption, and neglect have all conspired to strangle the growth of a legitimate legal system in Haiti. But as "How Human Rights Can Build Haiti" demonstrates, the story of lawyers-activists on the ground should give us all hope. They organize demonstrations at the street level, argue court cases at the international level, and conduct social media and lobbying campaigns across the globe. They are making historic claims and achieving real success as they tackle Haiti's cholera epidemic, post-earthquake housing and rape crises, and the Jean-Claude Duvalier prosecution, among other human rights emergencies in Haiti. The only way to transform Haiti's dismal human rights legacy is through a bottom-up social movement, supported by local and international challenges to the status quo. That recipe for reform mirrors the strategy followed by Mario Joseph, Brian Concannon, and their clients and colleagues profiled in this book. Together, Joseph, Concannon, and their allies represent Haiti's best hope to escape the cycle of disaster, corruption, and violence that has characterized the country's two-hundred-year history. At the same time, their efforts are creating a template for a new and more effective human rights-focused strategy to turn around failed states and end global poverty.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826519931 20160616
Law Library (Crown)
Book
50 p. ; 19 cm
"Aux lecteurs, La présente édition de la constitution, "autonomiste" pensée, souhaitée et promulguée par Toussaint-Louverture, est tirée d'un recueil de textes de lois relatifs à la république de Saint-Domingue, réunis par la prévoyance de Louis-Joseph Janvier. Ce texte est d'une grande portée : ce n'est rien de moins que le projet politique pour la colonie, durant les années où l'ancien esclave de l'habitation Bréda en était le gouverneur général. Témoignage, de cette épopée hors du commun, qui voit jaillir comme du néant, un génie politique rare. Ce texte est d'importance : à l'époque où il est édité, il ne reste que deux ans à vivre à son principal inspirateur : Toussaint-Louverture. Coup du sort ou clin d'oeil de l'Histoire, le texte est ratifié dans la colonie de Saint-Domingue, presque dix ans, jour pour jour après l'insurrection de la Plaine du Nord qui conduisit, par l'ampleur de ses répercussions, à peser de façon décisive dans la Métropole sur une solution favorable de la question coloniale dans le sens de ceux qui prônaient l'abolition. Cette abolition intervient de façon effective en 1794, après une session houleuse de l'Assemblée-Nation (Législative ou "Convention nationale"?) 1801 : année terrible s'il en fut, d'une période particulièrement troublée, après plus d'une décennie de tensions, de luttes, d'affrontements, de destructions mais aussi d'espérances, de reconstruction et de réconciliation, même partielle."--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
148 pages ; 22 cm
Green Library
Book
326 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Green Library
Book
xiii, 350 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Domestic enemies
  • Manumission was the means
  • Reconciling humanity and public policy
  • Stop the course of these cruelties
  • Less just than a despot?
  • To restore order and tranquility
  • Conclusion.
The Haitian Revolution (1789-1804) was an epochal event that galvanized slaves and terrified planters throughout the Atlantic world. Rather than view this tumultuous period solely as a radical rupture with slavery, Malick W. Ghachem's innovative study shows that emancipation in Haiti was also a long-term product of its colonial legal history. Ghachem takes us deep into this volatile colonial past, digging beyond the letter of the law and vividly re-enacting such episodes as the extraordinary prosecution of a master for torturing and killing his slaves. This book brings us face-to-face with the revolutionary invocation of Old Regime law by administrators seeking stability, but also by free people of color and slaves demanding citizenship and an end to brutality. The result is a subtle yet dramatic portrait of the strategic stakes of colonial governance in the land that would become Haiti.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521836807 20160607
Law Library (Crown)
Book
47 p. ; 27 cm.
  • I. Summary and Recommendations
  • Human Rights Abuses under Jean-Claude Duvalier
  • The Proceedings against Duvalier
  • Theories of Duvalier's Liability
  • Haiti's Obligation to Investigate and Punish Duvalier's Alleged Crimes
  • Institutional Challenges Facing the Prosecution
  • Recommendations
  • To the Government of Haiti
  • To Haitian Judicial Authorities
  • To the International Community and Donor States
  • Note on Methodology
  • II. Human Rights Abuses under Jean-Claude Duvalier
  • a) Political Prisoners and the Triangle of Death
  • b) "Disappearances" and Political Killings
  • c) Torture
  • d) Repression of the Press and Political Dissent
  • November 28, 1980: Duvalier and the Arrest, Torture, and Expulsion of Journalists and Activists
  • e) The Need to Investigate Sexual and Gender--Based Violence
  • III. The Proceedings against Duvalier
  • IV. Theories of Duvalier's Liability
  • a) Investigating Duvalier as an Accomplice to Crimes Committed by His Government
  • b) Investigating Duvalier for Crimes Committed under His Command Responsibility
  • 1. The Superior-Subordinate Relationship
  • 2. The Superior's Knowledge
  • Superior Duty to Take Necessary and Reasonable Measures to Prevent the Crime and to Punish the Perpetrator
  • V. Haiti has a Duty to Investigate and Punish Duvalier's Alleged Crimes
  • a) Haiti's International Obligation to Investigate Serious Violations of Human Rights or Crimes against Humanity Prevails over Any Statute of Limitations
  • b) The Continuous Nature of "Disappearances" and False Imprisonment Prevent Prescription
  • VI. Institutional Challenges Facing the Prosecution
  • a) Weak Capacity Can be Bolstered by International Support
  • b) Limited Resources can be Used Efficiently
  • c) Lack of Technical Expertise Can be Addressed with Expert Support
  • d) A Safer Political Environment Can be Created Through Political Support
  • VII. Conclusion
  • Acknowledgments.
"On January 16, 2011, former president-for-life of Haiti, Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier, returned to Haiti after nearly 25 years in exile. The government of Haiti responded by re-opening a 2008 investigation into alleged financial crimes, and several victims of serious human rights violations under the Duvalier regime also came forward and filed complaints with the prosecutor. The investigation into Duvalier's alleged financial and human rights crimes is currently underway. Haiti's Rendez-Vous with History provides an overview of human rights violations under Duvalier, details the current status of the proceedings against him, including obstacles to a successful prosecution, and analyzes applicable Haitian and international law. We conclude that investigation and prosecution of the grave violations of human rights under Duvalier's rule is required by Haiti's obligations under international law. While there are still obstacles to overcome, the case presents an historic opportunity for Haiti. Successful prosecution of Duvalier is important not only for Duvalier's many victims, but also for Haiti's struggling judicial system and for Haitian society more broadly. Bringing Duvalier to justice and giving him a fair trial could help restore Haitians' faith in the justice system and the rule of law. A prosecution could also act as a deterrent to other leaders, both in Haiti and elsewhere, demonstrating that they can be held accountable for serious violations of human rights. The challenges to fair and transparent prosecution of Duvalier are enormous but not insurmountable. The success of the case will depend on the political will of the government of Haiti to uphold its obligations under international law and rigorously pursue what could be the most important criminal case in its history, and on the willingness of the international community to provide essential support now and as the case develops."--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
78 p. : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
  • Summary
  • Key reccomendations
  • Methodology
  • Background
  • Obstacles to maternal and reproductive health : failure to protect women's and girl's rights
  • Donor states and non-state actors in Haiti
  • Conclusion
  • Recommendations
  • Acknowledgements.
"Despite an unprecedented influx of financial aid, the state of maternal health in post-earthquake Haiti remains precarious. Prenatal and obstetric care is inadequate. Many women have no access to contraceptives, including emergency contraception after rape, and many of the 300,000 women and girls who still live in displacement camps engage in sex for food or money in order to survive. The crisis is reflected in pregnancy rates in the camps that are three times higher than in urban areas before the earthquake, when rates of maternal mortality already ranked among the world's worst. Human Rights Watch interviewed 128 Haitian women and girls living in 15 displacement camps, in order to document these and other barriers to maternal health in post-earthquake Haiti. Access to even the most basic information related to reproductive and maternal health is severely limited. Even the small costs of transportation to and from health facilities or fees for medical prescriptions create serious obstacles for women and girls seeking health services. Women and girls who are consequently unable to access these services face further risks when they give birth in the unhealthy conditions of the displacement camps. This report also describes the impact of rape and survival sex on women's and girls' reproductive health, and the limited access to medical services necessary to prevent unwanted pregnancy. Long before the earthquake the government of Haiti was dependent on international aid to provide health care, and to address the problem of sexual violence. In the post-earthquake context donors should help the Haitian government to set up the oversight and accountability structures necessary to ensure that the rights of women and girls to adequate health care are protected. Without this assistance, women and girls living in the camps may not benefit from those services that are available to them and cannot seek a remedy when problems or abuses occur. Human Rights Watch calls on all actors in Haiti to prioritize the protection of women and girl's rights to maternal and reproductive health care in recovery efforts, and to ensure transparency and accountability in the provision of this protection, including by non-governmental actors"--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
221 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xviii, 457 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
143 p. ; 20 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
283 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
120 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 170 p. ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, 215 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
iii, 62 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
143 p. ; 18 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
[561]-610 p. ; 27 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
iv, 86 p. ; 21 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
160 p. ; 21 cm.
Law Library (Crown)