%{search_type} search results

425 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
xviii, 292 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • The Westway plan
  • Highways, subways, and the seeds of dissent
  • The art of regulatory war
  • The road warriors and the new environment
  • Searching for Westway's Achilles heel : air pollution?
  • Westway's fill and America's protected waters
  • The public fish story
  • Enter the independent federal judiciary and the power of law
  • Reexamining the 1971-1982 debacles
  • Westway's second chance
  • The trial crucible
  • The cross examination
  • Judgment days
  • Assessing Westway's outcome.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (313 pages) : illustrations
Book
1 online resource (viii, 495 pages ) : ill.
Book
1 online resource (522 pages) : illustrations
  • The post-war housing shortage
  • Between a rock and a hard place
  • A weighty decision
  • The great rent strikes
  • The mayor's committee on rent profiteering
  • Enter the state legislature
  • The April laws
  • The September laws
  • The battle in the state courts
  • The fight in the federal courts
  • A question of coverage
  • A reasonable rent
  • The four exceptions
  • Landlords and tenants in New York and Albany
  • The extension of rent control
  • The expiration of rent control
  • Epilogue.
Written by one of the country's foremost urban historians, The Great Rent Wars tells the fascinating but little-known story of the battles between landlords and tenants in the nation's largest city from 1917 through 1929. These conflicts were triggered by the post-war housing shortage, which prompted landlords to raise rents, drove tenants to go on rent strikes, and spurred the state legislature, a conservative body dominated by upstate Republicans, to impose rent control in New York, a radical and unprecedented step that transformed landlord-tenant relations. The Great Rent Wars traces the tumultuous history of rent control in New York from its inception to its expiration as it unfolded in New York, Albany, and Washington, D.C. At the heart of this story are such memorable figures as Al Smith, Fiorello H. La Guardia, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, as well as a host of tenants, landlords, judges, and politicians who have long been forgotten. Fogelson also explores the heated debates over landlord-tenant law, housing policy, and other issues that are as controversial today as they were a century ago.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300191721 20160612
Book
1 online resource (522 pages) : illustrations
  • The post-war housing shortage
  • Between a rock and a hard place
  • A weighty decision
  • The great rent strikes
  • The mayor's committee on rent profiteering
  • Enter the state legislature
  • The April laws
  • The September laws
  • The battle in the state courts
  • The fight in the federal courts
  • A question of coverage
  • A reasonable rent
  • The four exceptions
  • Landlords and tenants in New York and Albany
  • The extension of rent control
  • The expiration of rent control
  • Epilogue.
Written by one of the country's foremost urban historians, The Great Rent Wars tells the fascinating but little-known story of the battles between landlords and tenants in the nation's largest city from 1917 through 1929. These conflicts were triggered by the post-war housing shortage, which prompted landlords to raise rents, drove tenants to go on rent strikes, and spurred the state legislature, a conservative body dominated by upstate Republicans, to impose rent control in New York, a radical and unprecedented step that transformed landlord-tenant relations. The Great Rent Wars traces the tumultuous history of rent control in New York from its inception to its expiration as it unfolded in New York, Albany, and Washington, D.C. At the heart of this story are such memorable figures as Al Smith, Fiorello H. La Guardia, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, as well as a host of tenants, landlords, judges, and politicians who have long been forgotten. Fogelson also explores the heated debates over landlord-tenant law, housing policy, and other issues that are as controversial today as they were a century ago.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300191721 20171030
Book
viii, 495 pages, 16 pages of unnumbered plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • The post-war housing shortage
  • Between a rock and a hard place
  • A weighty decision
  • The great rent strikes
  • The mayor's committee on rent profiteering
  • Enter the state legislature
  • The April laws
  • The September laws
  • The battle in the state courts
  • The fight in the federal courts
  • A question of coverage
  • A reasonable rent
  • The four exceptions
  • Landlords and tenants in New York and Albany
  • The extension of rent control
  • The expiration of rent control.
Written by one of the country's foremost urban historians, The Great Rent Wars tells the fascinating but little-known story of the battles between landlords and tenants in the nation's largest city from 1917 through 1929. These conflicts were triggered by the post-war housing shortage, which prompted landlords to raise rents, drove tenants to go on rent strikes, and spurred the state legislature, a conservative body dominated by upstate Republicans, to impose rent control in New York, a radical and unprecedented step that transformed landlord-tenant relations. The Great Rent Wars traces the tumultuous history of rent control in New York from its inception to its expiration as it unfolded in New York, Albany, and Washington, D.C. At the heart of this story are such memorable figures as Al Smith, Fiorello H. La Guardia, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, as well as a host of tenants, landlords, judges, and politicians who have long been forgotten. Fogelson also explores the heated debates over landlord-tenant law, housing policy, and other issues that are as controversial today as they were a century ago.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300191721 20160612
Law Library (Crown)
Book
33 p. : col. ill. ; 27 cm.
  • Summary
  • Recommendations. To New York City elected and law enforcement officials. Research design. Demographics of the group under study
  • I. New York State marijuana laws. Marijuana arrests and use in New York City ; Marijuana arrests and public safety
  • II. Findings. Arrests ; Subsequent convictions
  • Conclusion
  • Acknowledgements
  • Methodological appendix. Study summary & New York State sealing Llaws ; Data ; Definition of the MJACD 03-04 cohort ; Criminal convictions ; Violent felony definition ; Injurious misdemeanor definition.
"In this report, Human Rights Watch offers new data indicating that people who enter the criminal justice system with an arrest for public possession of marijuana rarely commit violent crimes in the future. Over the last 15 years, New York City police have arrested more than 500,000 people - most of them young blacks or Hispanics - on misdemeanor charges of possessing small amounts of marijuana in public view. While Mayor Michael Bloomberg and the police have said the arrests have helped reduce violent crime, they have never specified how"--Publisher's website.
"Every year, New York City police arrest around 50,000 people--most of them young blacks or Hispanics--for the misdemeanor crime of possessing small amounts of marijuana in public view. New York City law enforcement and elected officials have never explained the rationale underlying why they focus so many resources on this type of misdemeanor arrest. Although some people make assertions that these arrests contribute to public safety, there has never been any empirical evidence offered in support. The disproportionate impact these arrests have on black and Hispanic city residents, as well as the fact that they consume so many scarce law enforcement and judicial resources, warrant a full, objective, and factual based explanation of this policing policy. This report analyzes the subsequent criminal histories of people who enter the New York criminal justice system with marijuana possession arrests. Based on tracking the criminal records of almost 30,000 people who had no prior criminal convictions when they were arrested for misdemeanor marijuana possession in 2003 and 2004, we find that as of June 2011, relatively few had been convicted of serious crimes: only 3.1 percent were convicted of one violent felony offense and an additional 0.4 percent had two or more violent felony convictions. Arresting and prosecuting those who commit violent crimes is a legitimate and necessary law enforcement objective. But it is not readily apparent how arresting and prosecuting 50,000 people annually for marijuana possession helps in that endeavor. If the reason is to enable the police to enter arrestees' fingerprints and other information into criminal databases so that they can identify anyone who may commit serious crimes in the future, our data indicates the police have cast too wide a net. The greater the numbers of people being arrested, and the more controversy and litigation spurred by this policing policy, the louder the absence of an official and transparent explanation becomes. Human Rights Watch calls on New York City officials to demonstrate that it has a non-discriminatory and human rights compliant policing policy in place to justify its focus on misdemeanor marijuana arrests"--Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
p. 365-684 ; 26 cm.
  • Reflections on the New York City Law Department / Edward I. Koch
  • Lawyers for government have unique responsibilities and opportunities to influence public policy / Frederick A. O. Schwartz, Jr.
  • Reflections on my years as corporation counsel / Peter L. Zimroth
  • Implementing a new city charter : thoughts on my tenure as corporation counsel in a time of transition / O. Peter Sherwood
  • The Giuliani years : corporation counsel 1994-1997 / Paul A. Crotty
  • The New York City Corporation Counsel : the best legal job in America / Michael A. Cardozo
  • The independence of the law department / Jeffrey D. Friedlander
  • Taking the offensive : New York City's affirmative suits / Gail Rubin
  • Institutional reform litigation / Leonard Koerner
  • A response : why William Nelson's analysis of the law department 1946-1965 is wrong / Paul A. Crotty
  • Defending the historian's art : a response to Paul A. Crotty's attack on Fighting for the city / William E. Nelson
  • The history of the New York City Law Department : Fighting for the city by William E. Nelson / Ross Sandler
  • Fighting for the city in context : William Nelson and the legal history of New York / William P. LaPiana.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
401 p. ; 25 cm
  • Prologue : welcome to county
  • White sales
  • A growth industry
  • Baggage
  • Good facts, bad facts
  • Luck
  • Busted again
  • A real lawyer
  • Charlie Chan
  • Perseveration
  • Freely and voluntarily
  • Father and son
  • Defective products
  • Fixes
  • A sensitive area
  • What really happened
  • Prejudice
  • Blame the po-lice
  • Compassion
  • Politics
  • Epilogue : a promising future.
The story of one year in Chicago's Cook County Criminal Courthouse, the busiest felony courthouse in the country, shown through the eyes of the men and women who experience it, not only in the courtroom but in the lockup, the jury room, the judge's chambers, the spectators' gallery.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
404 p. ; 25 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
LAW-7511-01
Book
xvii, 232 p., [10] p. of plates : ill.
Book
xi, 209 p. ; 23 cm.
  • The city of Memphis and progressive social reform
  • Child welfare and the establishment of the juvenile court
  • The juvenile court and the progressive child welfare network
  • Juvenile justice and the treatment of dependent children
  • Juvenile justice and the treatment of delinquent children.
The Juvenile Court of Memphis, founded in 1910, directed delinquent and dependent children into a variety of private charitable organizations and public correctional facilities. Drawing on the court's case files and other primary sources, Jennifer Trost explains the complex interactions between parents, children, and welfare officials in the urban South. Trost adds a personal dimension to her study by focusing on the people who appeared before the court - and not only on the legal specifics of their cases. Directed for thirty years by the charismatic and well-known chief judge Camille Kelley, the court was at once a traditional house of justice, a social services provider, an agent of state control, and a community-based mediator. Because the court saw boys and girls, blacks and whites, native Memphians and newly arrived residents with rural backgrounds, Trost is able to make subtle points about differences in these clients' experiences with the court. Those differences, she shows, were defined by the mix of Progressive and traditional attitudes that the involved parties held toward issues of class, race, and gender. Trost's insights are all the more valuable because the Memphis court had a large African American clientele. In addition, the court's jurisdiction extended beyond children engaged in criminal or otherwise unacceptable conduct to include those who suffered from neglect, abuse, or poverty. A work of legal history animated by questions more commonly posed by social historians, Gateway to Justice will engage anyone interested in how the early welfare state shaped, and was shaped by, tensions between public standards and private practices of parenting, sexuality, and race relations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780820326719 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 209 p. ; 23 cm.
  • The City of Memphis and progressive social reform
  • Child welfare and the establishment of the Juvenile Court
  • The Juvenile Court and the Progressive Child Welfare Network
  • Juvenile justice and the treatment of dependent children
  • Juvenile justice and the treatment of delinquent children.
The Juvenile Court of Memphis, founded in 1910, directed delinquent and dependent children into a variety of private charitable organizations and public correctional facilities. Drawing on the court's case files and other primary sources, Jennifer Trost explains the complex interactions between parents, children, and welfare officials in the urban South. Trost adds a personal dimension to her study by focusing on the people who appeared before the court - and not only on the legal specifics of their cases. Directed for thirty years by the charismatic and well-known chief judge Camille Kelley, the court was at once a traditional house of justice, a social services provider, an agent of state control, and a community-based mediator. Because the court saw boys and girls, blacks and whites, native Memphians and newly arrived residents with rural backgrounds, Trost is able to make subtle points about differences in these clients' experiences with the court. Those differences, she shows, were defined by the mix of Progressive and traditional attitudes that the involved parties held toward issues of class, race, and gender. Trost's insights are all the more valuable because the Memphis court had a large African American clientele. In addition, the court's jurisdiction extended beyond children engaged in criminal or otherwise unacceptable conduct to include those who suffered from neglect, abuse, or poverty. A work of legal history animated by questions more commonly posed by social historians, Gateway to Justice will engage anyone interested in how the early welfare state shaped, and was shaped by, tensions between public standards and private practices of parenting, sexuality, and race relations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780820326719 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
viii, 316 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Dismantling the dual system
  • Crowding, boundaries, and busing
  • Missed opportunities
  • Mounting problems
  • The federal connection
  • A changing metropolis
  • From metropolitan to magnets
  • Questionable attraction
  • The good times end.
Book
xxxix, 332 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Part I. Transformations: 1. The price of justice-- 2. A managerial revolution-- 3. Rethinking responsibility for a social age-- 4. Socializing the law-- Part II. Practices: Interlude: Socialized Law in Action-- 5. 'Keep sober, work, and support his family': the court of domestic relations-- 6. 'To protect her from the greed as well as the passions of man': the morals court-- 7. 'Upon the threshold of manhood': the boys' court-- 8. 'Keep the life stream pure': the psychopathic laboratory-- Part III. Misgivings: 9. America's first war on crime-- Afterword.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521790826 20160528
What could be more 'liberal' than the modern idea of social responsibility for crime - that crime is less the product of free will than of poverty and other social forces beyond the individual's control? And what could be more 'progressive' than the belief that the law should aim for social, not merely individual, justice? In this work of social, cultural, and legal history, Michael Willrich uncovers the contested origins and paradoxical consequences of these two protean concepts in the cosmopolitan cities of industrial America at the turn of the twentieth century. In Progressive Era Chicago, social activists, judges, and working-class families seeking justice transformed criminal courts into laboratories of progressive democracy. Willrich argues that this progressive effort to 'socialize' urban justice redefined American liberalism and the rule of law, laying an urban seedbed for the modern administrative welfare state.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521790826 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
2 v. in 1 ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 v. (loose-leaf) ; 30 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 v. (loose-leaf) ; 30 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
3 v. (loose-leaf) ; 30 cm.
Law Library (Crown)