%{search_type} search results

257 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
vi, 231 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • English legal literature as a source of law and practice in seventeenth-century Virginia / Warren M. Billings
  • Law books in the libraries of colonial Virginians / W. Hamilton Bryson
  • The library of the council of colonial Virginia / Brent Tarter
  • English statutes in Virginia, 1660-1714 / John Ruston Pagan
  • John Mercer : merchant, lawyer, author, book collector / Bennie Brown
  • The library reveals the man : George Wythe, legal and classical scholar / Linda K. Tesar
  • The law library of a working attorney : the example of Patrick Henry / Kevin J. Hayes
  • A Virginia original : George Webb's office and authority of a justice of peace / Warren M. Billings
  • A handbook for all : William Waller Hening's the new Virginia justice / R. Neil Hening
  • St. George Tucker : judge, legal scholar, and reformer of Virginia law / Charles F. Hobson.
Virginia men of law constituted one of the first learned professions in colonial America, and Virginia legal culture had an important and lasting impact on American political institutions and jurisprudence. Exploring the book collections of these Virginians therefore offers insight into the history of the book and early American intellectual history. It also addresses essential questions of how English culture migrated to the American colonies and was transformed into a distinctive American culture. Focusing on the law books that colonial Virginians acquired, how they used them, and how they eventually produced a native-grown legal literature, this collection of essays explores important aspects of the law and intellectual culture of the commonwealth that reveal the origins of a distinctively Virginian legal literature. The contributors argue that the development of early Virginia legal history-as revealed through these book collections-not only illuminates important aspects of Virginia's history and culture; it also underlies a thorough understanding of colonial and revolutionary American history and culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813939391 20180611
Green Library
Book
vi, 231 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • English legal literature as a source of law and practice in seventeenth-century Virginia / Warren M. Billings
  • Law books in the libraries of colonial Virginians / W. Hamilton Bryson
  • The library of the council of colonial Virginia / Brent Tarter
  • English statutes in Virginia, 1660-1714 / John Ruston Pagan
  • John Mercer : merchant, lawyer, author, book collector / Bennie Brown
  • The library reveals the man : George Wythe, legal and classical scholar / Linda K. Tesar
  • The law library of a working attorney : the example of Patrick Henry / Kevin J. Hayes
  • A Virginia original : George Webb's Office and authority of a justice of peace / Warren M. Billings
  • A handbook for all : William Waller Hening's The new Virginia justice / R. Neil Hening
  • St. George Tucker : judge, legal scholar, and reformer of Virginia law / Charles F. Hobson.
Virginia men of law constituted one of the first learned professions in colonial America, and Virginia legal culture had an important and lasting impact on American political institutions and jurisprudence. Exploring the book collections of these Virginians therefore offers insight into the history of the book and early American intellectual history. It also addresses essential questions of how English culture migrated to the American colonies and was transformed into a distinctive American culture. Focusing on the law books that colonial Virginians acquired, how they used them, and how they eventually produced a native-grown legal literature, this collection of essays explores important aspects of the law and intellectual culture of the commonwealth that reveal the origins of a distinctively Virginian legal literature. The contributors argue that the development of early Virginia legal history-as revealed through these book collections-not only illuminates important aspects of Virginia's history and culture; it also underlies a thorough understanding of colonial and revolutionary American history and culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813939391 20170327
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (1 volume (various pagings)).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (196 pages)
Book
324 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • Freedom bound in a new republic
  • Black clients, white attorneys
  • The Doswell brothers demand a law
  • Family and freedom in the neighborhood
  • To Liberia and back
  • Family bonds and Civil War
  • The barber of Boydton
  • Conclusion.
Between 1854 and 1864, more than a hundred free African Americans in Virginia proposed to enslave themselves and, in some cases, their children. Ted Maris-Wolf explains this phenomenon as a response to state legislation that forced free African Americans to make a terrible choice: leave enslaved loved ones behind for freedom elsewhere or seek a way to remain in their communities, even by renouncing legal freedom. Maris-Wolf paints an intimate portrait of these people whose lives, liberty, and use of Virginia law offer new understandings of race and place in the upper South. Maris-Wolf shows how free African Americans quietly challenged prevailing notions of racial restriction and exclusion, weaving themselves into the social and economic fabric of their neighborhoods and claiming, through unconventional or counterintuitive means, certain basic rights of residency and family. Employing records from nearly every Virginia county, he pieces together the remarkable lives of Watkins Love, Jane Payne, and other African Americans who made themselves essential parts of their communities and, in some cases, gave up their legal freedom in order to maintain family and community ties.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469620077 20160618
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (324 pages) : illustrations, map.
  • Introduction
  • Freedom bound in a new republic
  • Black clients, white attorneys
  • The Doswell brothers demand a law
  • Family and freedom in the neighborhood
  • To Liberia and back
  • Family bonds and Civil War
  • The barber of Boydton
  • Conclusion.
Between 1854 and 1864, more than a hundred free African Americans in Virginia proposed to enslave themselves and, in some cases, their children. Ted Maris-Wolf explains this phenomenon as a response to state legislation that forced free African Americans to make a terrible choice: leave enslaved loved ones behind for freedom elsewhere or seek a way to remain in their communities, even by renouncing legal freedom. Maris-Wolf paints an intimate portrait of these people whose lives, liberty, and use of Virginia law offer new understandings of race and place in the upper South. Maris-Wolf shows how free African Americans quietly challenged prevailing notions of racial restriction and exclusion, weaving themselves into the social and economic fabric of their neighborhoods and claiming, through unconventional or counterintuitive means, certain basic rights of residency and family. Employing records from nearly every Virginia county, he pieces together the remarkable lives of Watkins Love, Jane Payne, and other African Americans who made themselves essential parts of their communities and, in some cases, gave up their legal freedom in order to maintain family and community ties.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469620077 20161213
Law Library (Crown)
Book
173 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 359 pages : portraits ; 24 cm
  • Establishment : "true churchmen for the most part"
  • Toleration : "the free exercise of religion"
  • Statute : "establishing religious freedom"
  • Property : "to reconcile all the good people"
  • Litigation : "nursing fathers to the church"
  • Culture : making Virginia "a Christian country"
  • Politics : "neither hand nor finger in the pie"
  • Education : "Christianity will go in of itself"
  • Constitution : "a past that is dead and gone"
  • Bible : "to lift humanity".
The significance of the Virginia Statute for Establishing Religious Freedom goes far beyond the borders of the Old Dominion. Its influence ultimately extended to the Supreme Court's interpretation of the separation of church and state. In his latest book, Thomas Buckley tells the story of the statute, beginning with its background in the struggles of the colonial dissenters against an oppressive Church of England. When the Revolution forced the issue of religious liberty, Thomas Jefferson drafted his statute and James Madison guided its passage through the state legislature. Displacing an established church by instituting religious freedom, the Virginia statute provided the most substantial guarantees of religious liberty of any state in the new nation. The statute's implementation, however, proved to be problematic. Faced with a mandate for strict separation of church and state--and in an atmosphere of sweeping evangelical Christianity--Virginians clashed over numerous issues, including the legal ownership of church property, the incorporation of churches and religious groups, Sabbath observance, protection for religious groups, Bible reading in school, and divorce laws. Such debates pitted churches against one another and engaged Virginia's legal system for a century and a half. Fascinating history in itself, the effort to implement Jefferson's statute has even broader significance in its anticipation of the conflict that would occupy the whole country after the Supreme Court nationalised the religion clause of the First Amendment in the 1940s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813935034 20160612
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 414 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 192 p. ; 25 cm.
  • From family to individual and back again / Margaret F. Brinig
  • The legacy of Loving / John DeWitt Gregory, Joanna L. Grossman
  • Crossing borders : Loving v. Virginia as a story of migration / Victor C. Romero
  • Loving revisionism : on restricting marriage and subverting the constitution / Mark Strasser
  • In praise of Loving : reflections on the "Loving analogy" for same-sex marriage / Lynn D. Wardle, Lincoln C. Oliphant
  • Loving v. Virginia : and Mrs. Loving, speak to us today / Evan Wolfson.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 345 p.
  • History and background
  • The Innocence Commission for Virginia
  • The cases
  • An unmet obligation
  • Putting it together.
Book
xiii, 345 p. ; 24 cm.
  • History and background
  • The Innocence Commission for Virginia
  • The cases
  • An unmet obligation
  • Putting it all together.
DNA testing and advances in forensic science have shaken the foundations of the U.S. criminal justice system. One of the most visible results is the exoneration of inmates who were wrongly convicted and incarcerated, many of them sentenced to death for crimes they did not commit. This has caused a quandary for many states: how can claims of innocence be properly investigated and how can innocent inmates be reliably distinguished from the guilty? In answer, some states have created "innocence commissions" to establish policies and provide legal assistance to the improperly imprisoned. "The Innocence Commission" describes the creation and first years of the Innocence Commission for Virginia (ICVA), the second innocence commission in the nation and the first to conduct a systematic inquiry into all cases of wrongful conviction. Written by Jon B. Gould, the Chair of the ICVA, who is a professor of justice studies and an attorney, the book focuses on twelve wrongful conviction cases to show how and why wrongful convictions occur, what steps legal and state advocates took to investigate the convictions, how these prisoners were ultimately freed, and what lessons can be learned from their experiences. Gould recounts how a small band of attorneys and other advocates - in Virginia and around the country - have fought wrongful convictions in court, advanced the subject of wrongful convictions in the media, and sought to remedy the issue of wrongful convictions in the political arena. He makes a strong case for the need for Innocence Commissions in every state, showing that not only do Innocence Commissions help to identify weaknesses in the criminal justice system and offer workable improvements, but also protect society by helping to ensure that actual perpetrators are expeditiously identified, arrested, and brought to trial. Everyone has an interest in preventing wrongful convictions, from police officers and prosecutors, who seek the latest and best investigative techniques, to taxpayers, who want an efficient criminal justice system, to suspects who are erroneously pursued and sometimes convicted. Free of legal jargon and written for a general audience, "The Innocence Commission" is instructive, informative, and highly compelling reading.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814731796 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 256 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Series Forward-- Acknowledgements-- The Constitutional History of Virginia-- Virginia Constitution and Commentary-- Article I: Bill Of Rights-- Article II: Franchise Officers-- Division of Powers-- Article IV: Legislature-- Article V: Executive-- Article VI: Judiciary-- Article VII: Local Government-- Article VIII: Education-- Article IX: Corporations-- Article X: Taxation and Finance-- Article XI: Conservation. Article XII: Future Changes-- Schedule-- Notes to Part Two-- Bibliographical Essay-- Table of Cases.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780313332081 20160528
John Dinan analyzes the history and development of the Virginia Constitution and undertakes a detailed treatment of the evolving interpretation of each section, as seen in constitutional conventions, revisions commissions, judicial decisions, attorney general opinions, and legislative and gubernatorial deliberations. He also reveals that few states have made more opportunities than Virginia to engage in constitutional revision and, in the process, to debate fundamental political questions, whether in regard to the rights and liberties to which citizens are entitled, the extent of popular participation in governance, or the means of structuring governmental institutions. The first part of the book provides an overview of the development of the Virginia Constitution, and analyzes the principal debates that took place in the Conventions of 1776, 1829-30, 1850-51, 1861, 1864, 1867-68, and 1901-02, the Limited Conventions of 1945 and 1956, and the Revision Commissions of 1927 and 1969. The second part of the book undertakes a detailed treatment of the evolving interpretation of each Section of the Virginia Constitution, as seen in the relevant judicial decisions, attorney general opinions, and legislative and gubernatorial deliberations. Finally, this volume includes a bibliographical essay and table of cases that can assist lawyers, scholars, and students in conducting further research in particular areas.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780313332081 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 270 p. : maps ; 25 cm.
Women were once excluded everywhere from the legal profession, but by the 1990s the Virginia Supreme Court had three women among its seven justices. This is just one example of how law in Virginia has been transformed over the past century, as it has across the South and throughout the nation. In 'Blue Laws and Black Codes', Peter Wallenstein shows that laws were often changed not through legislative action or constitutional amendment but by citizens taking cases to state and federal courtrooms. Due largely to court rulings, for example, stores in Virginia are no longer required by "blue laws" to close on Sundays. Particularly notable was the abolition of segregation laws, modified versions of southern states' "black codes" dating back to the era of slavery and the first years after emancipation. Virginia's long road to racial equality under the law included the efforts of black civil rights lawyers to end racial discrimination in the public schools, the 1960 Richmond sit-ins, a case against segregated courtrooms, and a court challenge to a law that could imprison or exile an interracial couple for their marriage. While emphasizing a single state, 'Blue Laws and Black Codes' is framed in regional and national contexts. Regarding blue laws, Virginia resembled most American states. Regarding racial policy, Virginia was distinctly southern. Wallenstein shows how people pushed for changes in the laws under which they live, love, work, vote, study, and shop - in Virginia, the South, and the nation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813922614 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 270 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
Women were once excluded everywhere from the legal profession, but by the 1990s the Virginia Supreme Court had three women among its seven justices. This is just one example of how law in Virginia has been transformed over the past century, as it has across the South and throughout the nation. In 'Blue Laws and Black Codes', Peter Wallenstein shows that laws were often changed not through legislative action or constitutional amendment but by citizens taking cases to state and federal courtrooms. Due largely to court rulings, for example, stores in Virginia are no longer required by "blue laws" to close on Sundays. Particularly notable was the abolition of segregation laws, modified versions of southern states' "black codes" dating back to the era of slavery and the first years after emancipation. Virginia's long road to racial equality under the law included the efforts of black civil rights lawyers to end racial discrimination in the public schools, the 1960 Richmond sit-ins, a case against segregated courtrooms, and a court challenge to a law that could imprison or exile an interracial couple for their marriage. While emphasizing a single state, 'Blue Laws and Black Codes' is framed in regional and national contexts. Regarding blue laws, Virginia resembled most American states. Regarding racial policy, Virginia was distinctly southern. Wallenstein shows how people pushed for changes in the laws under which they live, love, work, vote, study, and shop - in Virginia, the South, and the nation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813922614 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 270 p.
  • The case of the laborer from Louisa : conscripts, convicts, and public roads, 1890s-1920s
  • Necessity, charity, and a sabbath : citizens, courts, and Sunday closing laws, 1920s-1980s
  • These new and strange beings : race, sex, and the legal profession, 1870s-1970s
  • The siege against segregation : Black Virginians and the law of civil rights
  • To sit or not to sit : scenes in Richmond from the civil rights movement
  • Racial identity and the crime of marriage : the view from twentieth-century Virginia
  • Power and policy in an American state : federal courts, political rights, and policy outcomes
  • From Harry Byrd to Douglas Wilder : gender, race, and judgeships.
Book
xvii, 298 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • I do
  • The passing capital of America
  • Making sense of senseless laws
  • How it all began
  • The prosecutions continue
  • Taking away the children and the money
  • The West leads the way
  • The organizations challenge, and the challenges become organized
  • The sad case of Ruby and Ham
  • Connie and Dewey share a room
  • Richard and Mildred want to go home
  • On to the Supreme Court
  • The Amicus briefs
  • Virginia and North Carolina defend the indefensible
  • May it please the court
  • The Supreme Court speaks
  • Not all states listen
  • "A big interracial display of their romance"
  • The Feds finally step in
  • Happily ever after.
This volume chronicles the history of laws banning interracial marriage in the United States with particular emphasis on the case of Richard and Mildred Loving, a white man and a black woman who were convicted by the state of Virginia for the crime of marrying across racial lines in the late 1950s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809325283 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvii, 298 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • I do
  • The passing capital of America
  • Making sense of senseless laws
  • How it all began
  • The prosecutions continue
  • Taking away the children and the money
  • The West leads the way
  • The organizations challenge, and the challenges become organized
  • The sad case of Ruby and Ham
  • Connie and Dewey share a room
  • Richard and Mildred want to go home
  • On to the Supreme Court
  • The Amicus briefs
  • Virginia and North Carolina defend the indefensible
  • May it please the court
  • The Supreme Court speaks
  • Not all states listen
  • "A big interracial display of their romance"
  • The Feds finally step in
  • Happily ever after.
This volume chronicles the history of laws banning interracial marriage in the United States with particular emphasis on the case of Richard and Mildred Loving, a white man and a black woman who were convicted by the state of Virginia for the crime of marrying across racial lines in the late 1950s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809325283 20160528
Green Library
Book
222 p. : map.
"Anne Orthwood's Bastard" tells the story of a maidservant from Bristol, England who emigrated to Virginia's Eastern Shore in 1662, became pregnant by a caddish nephew of a colonial politician, and died in childbirth, leaving an illegitimate son and a host of knotty legal problems. Through a study of the four cases stemming from this birth and the people involved, Pagan uses the community's response to illuminate the emerging distinctiveness of early American law. He argues that the peculiar structure of Virginia's economy and labour system accounts for many of the differences between colonial and English law, and contends that Virginia leaders skilfully shaped legal doctrines and institutions to serve their own agenda.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195144789 20180521
In 1663, an indentured servant, Anne Orthwood, was impregnated with twins in a tavern in Northampton County, Virginia. Orthwood died soon after giving birth; one of the twins, Jasper, survived. Orthwood's illegitimate pregnancy sparked four related cases that came before the Northampton magistrates - who coincidentally held court in the same tavern - between 1664 and 1686. These interrelated cases and the decisions rendered in them are notable for the ways in which the Virginia colonists modified English common law traditions and began to create their own, as well as what they reveal about cultural and economic values in an Eastern shore community. Through these cases, the very reasons legal systems are created are revealed, namely, the maintenance of social order, the protection of property interests, the protection of personal reputation, and personal liberty. Through Jasper Orthwood's life, the treatment of the poor in small communities is set in sharp relief.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195144796 20180521