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Book
viii, 202 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
In 1917, barely into his second term as governor of Texas, James E. Ferguson was impeached, convicted, and removed from office. Impeached provides a new examination of the rise and fall of Ferguson's political fortunes, offering a focused look at how battles over economic class, academic freedom, women's enfranchisement, and concentrated political power came to be directed toward one politician. Jessica Brannon-Wranosky and Bruce A. Glasrud have brought together top scholars to shine a light on this unique chapter in Texas history. An overview by John R. Lundberg offers a comprehensive survey of the impeachment process. Kay Reed Arnold then follows the Ferguson story into the halls of academia at the University of Texas-which Ferguson threatened to close-sparking a fierce response by faculty, alumni, students, and, especially, the Women's Committee for Good Government. Rachel M. Gunter further places the Ferguson impeachment in the context of the suffrage movement. Leah LaGrone Ochoa then explores Ferguson's hot-and-cold relationship with the Texas press, and Mark Stanley examines the impact of the impeachment on Texas politics in the decades that followed. Jessica Brannon-Wranosky concludes with an assessment of the historical memory of Ferguson's impeachment throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Impeached: The Removal of Texas Governor James E. Ferguson, reveals how power ebbed and flowed in twentieth-century Texas and includes several annotated primary documents critical to understanding the Ferguson impeachment.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781623495275 20171030
Green Library
Book
xvii, 245 pages : maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction. White slaves and ownership rights in Central Texas
  • Sex, race, and family on the Gulf Coast
  • Slave resistance and class conflict in the Redlands
  • A free family of color on the borderland
  • Lawyers and slaves on Galveston Island
  • Telling stories of slavery and freedom.
In these absorbing accounts of five court cases, Jason A. Gilmer offers intimate glimpses into Texas society in the time of slavery. Each story unfolds along boundaries - between men and women, slave and free, black and white, rich and poor, old and young - as rigid social orders are upset in ways that drive people into the courtroom., br>One case involves a settler in a rural county along the Colorado River, his thirty-year relationship with an enslaved woman, and the claims of their children as heirs. A case in East Texas arose after an owner refused to pay an overseer who had shot one of her slaves. Another case details how a free family of color carved out a life in the sparsely populated marshland of Southeast Texas, only to lose it all as waves of new settlers "civilized" the county. An enslaved woman in Galveston who was set free in her owner's will - and who got an uncommon level of support from her attorneys - is the subject of another case. In a Central Texas community, as another case recounts, citizens forced a Choctaw native into court in an effort to gain freedom for his slave, a woman who easily "passed" as white.The cases considered here include Gaines v. Thomas, Clark v. Honey, Brady v. Price, and Webster v. Heard. All of them pitted communal attitudes and values against the exigencies of daily life in an often harsh place. Here are real people in their own words, as gathered from trial records, various legal documents, and many other sources. People of many colors, from diverse backgrounds, weave their way in and out of the narratives. We come to know what mattered most to them - and where those personal concerns stood before the law.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780820351339 20171121
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvii, 245 pages : maps ; 24 cm.
In these absorbing accounts of five court cases, Jason A. Gilmer offers intimate glimpses into Texas society in the time of slavery. Each story unfolds along boundaries - between men and women, slave and free, black and white, rich and poor, old and young - as rigid social orders are upset in ways that drive people into the courtroom., br>One case involves a settler in a rural county along the Colorado River, his thirty-year relationship with an enslaved woman, and the claims of their children as heirs. A case in East Texas arose after an owner refused to pay an overseer who had shot one of her slaves. Another case details how a free family of color carved out a life in the sparsely populated marshland of Southeast Texas, only to lose it all as waves of new settlers "civilized" the county. An enslaved woman in Galveston who was set free in her owner's will - and who got an uncommon level of support from her attorneys - is the subject of another case. In a Central Texas community, as another case recounts, citizens forced a Choctaw native into court in an effort to gain freedom for his slave, a woman who easily "passed" as white.The cases considered here include Gaines v. Thomas, Clark v. Honey, Brady v. Price, and Webster v. Heard. All of them pitted communal attitudes and values against the exigencies of daily life in an often harsh place. Here are real people in their own words, as gathered from trial records, various legal documents, and many other sources. People of many colors, from diverse backgrounds, weave their way in and out of the narratives. We come to know what mattered most to them - and where those personal concerns stood before the law.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780820351339 20171121
Green Library
Book
xiv, 204 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • * Foreword by James W. Marquart * Acknowledgments * Introduction * Determinate Sentencing and the Texas Youth Commission: A Timeline *1. Origins and Discoveries *2. The Determinate Sentencing Act in Texas *3. The Sheep That Got Lost *4. Doing Time in the Texas Youth Commission *5. Another Second Chance *6. The Burden of Second Chances *7. Three Decades Later *8. The Last Word * Notes * Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477308455 20160906
What should be done with minors who kill, maim, defile, and destroy the lives of others? The state of Texas deals with some of its most serious and violent youthful offenders through "determinate sentencing, " a unique sentencing structure that blends parts of the juvenile and adult justice systems. Once adjudicated via determinate sentencing, offenders are first incarcerated in the Texas Youth Commission (TYC). As they approach age eighteen, they are either transferred to the Texas prison system to serve the remainder of their original determinate sentence or released from TYC into Texas's communities. The first long-term study of determinate sentencing in Texas, Lost Causes examines the social and delinquent histories, institutionalization experiences, and release and recidivism outcomes of more than 3,000 serious and violent juvenile offenders who received such sentences between 1987 and 2011. The authors seek to understand the process, outcomes, and consequences of determinate sentencing, which gave serious and violent juvenile offenders one more chance to redeem themselves or to solidify their place as the next generation of adult prisoners in Texas. The book's findings-that about 70 percent of offenders are released to the community during their most crime-prone years instead of being transferred to the Texas prison system and that about half of those released continue to reoffend for serious crimes-make Lost Causes crucial reading for all students and practitioners of juvenile and criminal justice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477308455 20160906
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxii, 192 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • The research process and legal analysis
  • Judicial opinions
  • Constitutions, statutes, and procedural and ethical rules
  • Researching legislative history
  • Researching administrative law
  • Updating research
  • Researching secondary authorities
  • Research strategies and organization
  • Where to find Tennessee law.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (1 volume (various pagings)).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxv, 238 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • The research process and legal analysis
  • Research techniques
  • Secondary sources
  • Constitutional law
  • Statutory research
  • Bill tracking and legislative history
  • Administrative law
  • Court systems and judicial opinions
  • Searching for cases
  • Local government research
  • Citators.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (1 volume (various pagings)).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxvi, 291 pages : maps ; 24 cm
  • Chapter One: Uncovering Racial Purposes in Voting Rights Politics Chapter Two: In Search of Racism Chapter Three: Racism, the Arlington Heights Factos, and Latinos Chapter Four: Latino Identity, Whiteness, and Dual-Race Theory Chapter Five: "Do Citizens Select Legislators or Do Legislators Select Their Constituents?" Chapter Six: There is a Method to This Madness Chapter Seven: Strategic Racism Uncovered.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739190456 20160618
This volume explores the role race and racism played in the Texas redistricting process and the creation and passage of the state's Voter Identification Law in 2011. The author puts forth research techniques designed to uncover racism and racist intentions even in the face of denials by the public policy decision makers involved. In addition to reviewing the redistricting history of the state, this book also provides an analysis of court decisions concerning the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution, the Voting Rights Act, and a thorough discussion of the Shelby County decision. The author brings together scholarly research and the analysis of significant Supreme Court decisions focusing on race to discuss Texas' election policy process. The core of the book centers on two federal court trials where both the state's congressional, house redistricting efforts, and the Voter ID Bill were found to violate the Voting Rights Act. This is the first book that speaks specifically to the effects of electoral politics and Latinos. The author develops new ground in racial political studies calling for movement beyond the 'dual-race' theoretical models that have been used by both the academy and the courts in looking at the effects of race on the public policy process. The author concludes that the historically tense race relations between Anglos and Latinos in Texas unavoidably affected both the redistricting process and the creation and design of the Voter ID Bill.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739190456 20160618
Green Library
Book
xxvi, 291 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Uncovering racial pupose in voting rights politics
  • In search of racism
  • Racism, the Arlington Heights factors, and Latinos
  • Latino identity, whiteness, and dual-race theory
  • "Do citizens select legislators or do legislators select their constituents?"
  • There is a method to this madness
  • Strategic racism uncovered.
This volume explores the role race and racism played in the Texas redistricting process and the creation and passage of the state's Voter Identification Law in 2011. The author puts forth research techniques designed to uncover racism and racist intentions even in the face of denials by the public policy decision makers involved. In addition to reviewing the redistricting history of the state, this book also provides an analysis of court decisions concerning the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution, the Voting Rights Act, and a thorough discussion of the Shelby County decision. The author brings together scholarly research and the analysis of significant Supreme Court decisions focusing on race to discuss Texas' election policy process. The core of the book centers on two federal court trials where both the state's congressional, house redistricting efforts, and the Voter ID Bill were found to violate the Voting Rights Act. This is the first book that speaks specifically to the effects of electoral politics and Latinos. The author develops new ground in racial political studies calling for movement beyond the 'dual-race' theoretical models that have been used by both the academy and the courts in looking at the effects of race on the public policy process. The author concludes that the historically tense race relations between Anglos and Latinos in Texas unavoidably affected both the redistricting process and the creation and design of the Voter ID Bill.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739190456 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiii, 257 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • In the crosshairs
  • "They grabbed the pendulum . . . and nailed it to the wall!" : highlights of tort reform, Texas style
  • A glimpse of the past and the development of the Texas Plaintiffs' Bar
  • The tension between professional norms and the need to generate business : a window into professional identity
  • "People like me are really the majority of plaintiffs' lawyers" : structure and hierarchy in the Texas Plaintiffs' Bar
  • "If my referring lawyers go away, I'm in trouble" : reputation, specialization, and the referral of cases
  • "The juice simply isn't worth the squeeze in those cases anymore" : damage caps, "hidden victims," and the declining interest in medical malpractice cases
  • Conclusion: "Unless there's a way to make money practicing law, rights don't make any difference".
Tort reform is a favorite cause for many business leaders and right-leaning politicians, who contend that out-ofcontrol lawsuits throttle growth and inflate costs, particularly in healthcare. Less is said about how such reforms might affect the ability of individuals to recover damages for injuries suffered through another partyAEs negligence. On that count, Texasuwhere efforts at tort reform have been energetic and successfuluprovides an opportunity to appraise the outcome for plaintiffs and their lawyers, an opportunity that Stephen Daniels and Joanne Martin take full advantage of in this timely and provocative work. Because much of the action on tort reform takes place on the state level, a look at the experience of Texas, a large and important state with a very active plaintiffAEs bar, is especially instructive. PlaintiffsAE lawyers work on a contingency fee basis, collecting compensation for themselves as a percentage only if they win. Reduce lawyersAE ability to use contingency fees as compensation, as tort reform inevitably does, and you reduce their economic incentive to do this work. DanielsAE and MartinAEs study bears this out. Drawing on over 20 years of research, extensive surveys and interviews, the authors explore the impact the tort reform movement in Texas has had on the ability of plaintiffs to obtain judgmentsuin short on private citizensAE meaningful access to the full power of the law. In the course of their analysis, the authors explain the history and economics behind the workings of the plaintiffsAE bar. They explore how lawyers select cases and clients, as well as the referral process that moves cases among lawyers and allows for specialization. They also examine the effects of medical malpractice reforms on plaintiffsAE lawyersureforms that often close the courthouse doors to certain types of peopleutort reformAEs ohidden victims.o PlaintiffsAE lawyers are the civil justice systemAEs gatekeepers, providing meaningful access to the rights the law provides. DanielsAEs and MartinAEs thorough and fair-minded work offers a unique and sobering perspective on how tort reform can curtail this accessuand thus, the legal rights of American citizens.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780700620739 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (502 pages) : illustrations, tables
  • Preface 1. An Overview of Education Law, Texas Schools, and Parent Rights Sources of Law Constitutional Law Statutory Law Administrative Law Judicial Law The Structure and Governance of the Texas School System Texas Legislature State Board of Education and the Texas Education Agency Local School Districts Charter Schools Private Schools School Administrators District- and Campus-Level Decision-Making How the U.S. Constitution and Federal Government Affect Texas Schools Key Provisions of the U.S. Constitution Important Federal Statutes School Finance Parent Rights Rights within Public Schools Choosing Private Schools Educating Children at Home Summary 2. Student Attendance and the Instructional Program Attendance Impermissible Discrimination Residency, Guardianship, and the Right to Attend a District's Schools The Compulsory School Attendance Law Kindergarten and Prekindergarten Programs Absences Maintaining a Safe School Environment The Instructional Program The Required Curriculum Student Assessment School District Accountability The Effect of the No Child Left Behind Act Removal of Objectionable Library and Study Materials Technology at School: Computers, the Internet, and Cell Phones The Federal Copyright Law Extracurricular Activities and the UIL Addressing the Needs of Special Groups At-Risk Children Bilingual Children Gifted Children Abused and Neglected Children Summary 3. Special Education The Jargon of Special Education Federal Legislation Child Find Evaluation Eligibility Response to Intervention (RtI) ARD Committee Individualized Education Program General Curriculum NCLB and Statewide Assessments Least Restrictive Environment Procedural Safeguards Attorneys' Fees FAPE Related Services Extended School Year Services Unilateral Placements Private-School Children Discipline of Students with Disabilities Expulsion Stay Put Change of Placement Ten Days Manifestation Determinations Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Summary 4. The Employment Relationship Constitutional Issues Due Process of Law How Much Process Is Due? Types of Employment Arrangements At-Will Employment Non-Chapter 21 Contracts Probationary Contracts Term Contracts Continuing Contracts Third-Party Independent Contract Educators and Retire/Rehire Selection of Staff Certification and the Role of SBEC Nondiscrimination Laws Protected Activity The Hiring Process Criminal Records The Impact of NCLB Restrictions on Employment Ending the Relationship At-Will Employees Non-Chapter 21 Contracts Probationary Contracts Term Contracts Contract Nonrenewal Contract Termination Professional Capacity Dual-Assignment Contracts Remedies Reduction in Force (RIF) Continuing Contracts The Independent Hearing System A Few Final Thoughts on "Good Cause" Constructive Discharge Summary 5. Personnel Issues Reassignment The Constitutional Issues Same Professional Capacity Compensation Issues Duties and Schedule The Commissioner's Jurisdiction Reassignment of the Superintendent Compensation Disputes Teacher Appraisal Employment Benefits Planning and Preparation Period Duty-Free Lunch Personal Leave Health Insurance Assault Leave Teacher Retirement Temporary Disability Leave Family and Medical Leave Act USERRA Miscellaneous Leave Policies Wage and Hour Requirements Workers' Compensation and Unemployment Compensation Grievances and the Role of Employee Organizations Employee Grievances: A Little History Hearing Employee Grievances The Role of Employee Organizations Collective Bargaining on the National Scene The Law in Texas Summary 6. Expression and Associational Rights Educator Rights of Expression Expression outside the School Expression within the School Electronic Communication Academic Freedom Texas Whistleblower Act Educator Freedom of Association Student Rights of Expression Communication among Students on Campus School-Sponsored Student Publications Non-School-Sponsored Student Publications and Materials Electronic Communication Student Freedom of Association Summary 7. Religion in the Schools Legal Framework No Government Establishment of Religion Free Exercise of Religion Contemporary Issues The Pledge of Allegiance School Prayer School-Sponsored or Employee-Led Prayer Silent Meditation Invocations, Benedictions, and Religious Speeches at Graduation Baccalaureate Ceremonies Student-Initiated Prayer at School, Extracurricular Activities, and Athletic Events Teaching Creation-Science Secular Humanism and Pagan Religion Religion in Classrooms, Choir Programs, and Holiday Observances Teaching about Religion Student Papers and Presentations on Religious Topics Choir Programs Holiday Observances Clergy in the Schools Distribution of Religious Literature Wearing Religious Symbols Student Religious Groups Meeting on Campus Religious Exemptions Assistance to Sectarian Private Schools Summary 8. Student Discipline Constitutional Concerns: Due Process Other Constitutional Issues Overbreadth Protected Areas Void for Vagueness Chapter 37: An Overview Student Code of Conduct Bullying Teacher-Initiated Removal Suspension Removal to a DAEP Mandatory Placements Discretionary Placements Procedure Life in a DAEP Expulsion Grounds Procedures Emergency Actions Interaction with Law Enforcement Other Disciplinary Practices Corporal Punishment Suspension from Extracurricular Activities Summary 9. Privacy Issues: Community, Educators, Students The Legal Framework The U.S. Constitution Federal Statutes State Law The Texas Open Meetings and Public Information Acts Texas Open Meetings Act Meetings and Quorums Notice Emergency Meetings Closed Sessions Tape Recordings and Certified Agendas Meetings by Telephone and Videoconference Call Internet Broadcast Violations Criminal Provisions Texas Public Information Act Items That Must Be Disclosed Personal Information Criminal History Information, Witness Statements, and Investigative Reports Inter- or Intraagency Memoranda Student Records Other Exempt Items Production of Records Educator Privacy Rights Lifestyle Issues Employee Drug Testing Personnel Records and Employee References Search of School Computer Files and Pagers Search of File Cabinets Student Privacy Rights Student Personal Privacy Student Records Parent Rights Education Records Disclosure of Records Recordkeeping Violations Child Custody Issues Student Dress and Grooming Student Search and Seizure Standards for Student Searches Strip Searches Use of Magnetometers, Metal Detectors, and Breathalyzers Locker and Desk Searches Search of Cell Phones and Electronic Communications Use of Sniffer Dogs to Conduct Searches Student Drug Testing Summary 10. Legal Liability Identifying Areas of Legal Liability State Torts School District Immunity Sovereign Immunity and Contract Cases Qualified Immunity for Public School Professional Employees The Special Case of Corporal Punishment and Physical Force Law and the School Counselor Federal Civil Rights Liability Governmental Liability Individual Liability Personal Injuries and the Constitution A Federally Protected Right The District Itself Is Responsible More Than Negligence A New Theory Liability under Federal Statutory Law Summary Appendixes A. How to Find and Read a Court Case B. Glossary of Legal Terminology C. Reference Sources Index of Cases Index of Topics Tables 1. Basic Components of Texas Education Law 2. Relationship of Law to Establishment and Operation of Texas Public Schools 3. School Finance at a Glance 4. Major School Desegregation Decisions, 1954-2007 5. Complying with Copyright Guidelines Figures 1. The Overall Structure of Texas Administrative Law 2. Geographic Jurisdiction of U.S. District Courts in Texas.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292760837 20160704
Much has changed in the area of school law since the first edition of The Educator's Guide was published in 1986. Successive editions grew incrementally longer to keep abreast of legal developments. In this new eighth edition, the authors have streamlined the discussion by pruning older material and weaving in new developments. The result is an authoritative source on all major dimensions of Texas school law that is both well integrated and easy to read. Intended for Texas school personnel, school board members, interested attorneys, and taxpayers, the eighth edition explains what the law is and what the implications are for effective school operations. It is designed to help professional educators avoid expensive and time consuming lawsuits by taking effective preventive action. It is an especially valuable resource for school law courses and staff development sessions. The eighth edition begins with a review of the legal structure of the Texas school system. As Chapter 1 notes, education law is a complex interweaving of state and federal constitutional, statutory, administrative, and judicial law. It is important to understand the nature of the system before reading other sections. Successive chapters address attendance and the instructional program, the education of children with special needs, employment and personnel, expression and associational rights, the role of religion in public schools, student discipline, open meetings and records, privacy, search and seizure, and legal liability under both federal and Texas law. In addition to state law, the book addresses the role of the federal government in school operation through such major federal legislation as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Statute and case references are kept as simple as possible, and a complete index of case citations is included for those readers who wish to consult the cases themselves. The appendices describe how case law is reported and where to find it, along with a glossary of legal terms and a listing of other sources on Texas school law.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292760837 20160704
Book
xi, 247 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 25 cm.
  • The unique characteristics of water and water rights in Texas
  • Water rights and water law in general
  • Water : state owned
  • Water : privately owned
  • Water : shared ownership
  • Supply and demand, today and tomorrow
  • How we use water
  • Who regulates water use?
  • Water and everyday real estate transactions
  • Public policy debates in the recent past
  • Public policy through the crystal ball
  • Epilogue
  • Appendix 1. Significant court cases concerning Texas water rights
  • Appendix 2. Government and other resources
  • Appendix 3. Texas Supreme Court cases and other significant Texas cases.
If all the people, municipalities, agencies, businesses, power plants, and other entities that think they have a right to the water in Texas actually tried to exercise those rights, there would not be enough water to satisfy all claims, no matter how legitimate. In Sharing the Common Pool: Water Rights in the Everyday Lives of Texans, water rights expert Charles Porter explains in the simplest possible terms who has rights to the water in Texas, who determines who has those rights, and who benefits or suffers because of it. The origins of Texas water law, which contains elements of the state's Spanish, English, and Republic heritages, contributed to the development of a system that defines water by where it sits, flows, or falls and assigns its ownership accordingly. Over time, this seemingly logical, even workable, set of expectations has evolved into a tortuous collection of laws, permits, and governing authorities under the onslaught of population growth and competing interests--agriculture, industry, cities--all with insatiable thirsts. In sections that cover ownership, use, regulation, real estate, and policy, Porter lays out in as straightforward a fashion as possible just how we manage (and mismanage) water in this state, what legal cases have guided the debate, and where the future might take us as old rivalries, new demands, and innovative technologies--such as hydraulic fracturing of oil shale formations ("fracking")--help redefine water policy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781623491376 20160616
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 594 pages ; 27 cm
  • Development of state constitutions
  • State constitutions and the federal system
  • State judicial power
  • Dually protected individual rights under state constitutions
  • Unique state constitutional protections for individual rights
  • Separation of powers
  • Legislative powers, duties, and limitations
  • State executive power.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxvi, 322 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword by William S. Pugsley-- Preface-- Acknowledgments-- Prologue 1. Ancient Heritage, New Circumstance-- 2. Good Intentions, Fitful Beginnings-- 3. A Functioning Judiciary-- 4. The Frontier Court-- 5. The Antebellum Court-- 6. The Civil War Court-- 7. The Reconstruction Courts-- 8. The Redeemer Court-- 9. The Capitol Court and the Public Lands-- 10. The Capitol Court and the Gilded Age-- 11. The Consensus Court-- 12. The Wrench in the Gears-- 13. The Cureton Court-- 14. The Wartime Court-- 15. The Fifties Court-- 16. The Calvert Court-- 17. The Court in Flux Appendix A. Milestones in the Organization and Operation of the Texas Supreme Court-- Appendix B. Justices of the Texas Supreme Court, 1836-2012, with Appointment/Election Dates Notes-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292744585 20160615
"Few people realize that in the area of law, Texas began its American journey far ahead of most of the rest of the country, far more enlightened on such subjects as women's rights and the protection of debtors." Thus James Haley begins this highly readable account of the Texas Supreme Court. The first book-length history of the Court published since 1917, it tells the story of the Texas Supreme Court from its origins in the Republic of Texas to the political and philosophical upheavals of the mid-1980s. Using a lively narrative style rather than a legalistic approach, Haley describes the twists and turns of an evolving judiciary both empowered and constrained by its dual ties to Spanish civil law and English common law. He focuses on the personalities and judicial philosophies of those who served on the Supreme Court, as well as on the interplay between the Court's rulings and the state's unique history in such areas as slavery, women's rights, land and water rights, the rise of the railroad and oil and gas industries, Prohibition, civil rights, and consumer protection. The book is illustrated with more than fifty historical photos, many from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It concludes with a detailed chronology of milestones in the Supreme Court's history and a list, with appointment and election dates, of the more than 150 justices who have served on the Court since 1836.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292744585 20160615
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxvi, 322 p. : ill., ports.
  • Foreword by William S. Pugsley-- Preface-- Acknowledgments-- Prologue 1. Ancient Heritage, New Circumstance-- 2. Good Intentions, Fitful Beginnings-- 3. A Functioning Judiciary-- 4. The Frontier Court-- 5. The Antebellum Court-- 6. The Civil War Court-- 7. The Reconstruction Courts-- 8. The Redeemer Court-- 9. The Capitol Court and the Public Lands-- 10. The Capitol Court and the Gilded Age-- 11. The Consensus Court-- 12. The Wrench in the Gears-- 13. The Cureton Court-- 14. The Wartime Court-- 15. The Fifties Court-- 16. The Calvert Court-- 17. The Court in Flux Appendix A. Milestones in the Organization and Operation of the Texas Supreme Court-- Appendix B. Justices of the Texas Supreme Court, 1836-2012, with Appointment/Election Dates Notes-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292744585 20160615
"Few people realize that in the area of law, Texas began its American journey far ahead of most of the rest of the country, far more enlightened on such subjects as women's rights and the protection of debtors." Thus James Haley begins this highly readable account of the Texas Supreme Court. The first book-length history of the Court published since 1917, it tells the story of the Texas Supreme Court from its origins in the Republic of Texas to the political and philosophical upheavals of the mid-1980s. Using a lively narrative style rather than a legalistic approach, Haley describes the twists and turns of an evolving judiciary both empowered and constrained by its dual ties to Spanish civil law and English common law. He focuses on the personalities and judicial philosophies of those who served on the Supreme Court, as well as on the interplay between the Court's rulings and the state's unique history in such areas as slavery, women's rights, land and water rights, the rise of the railroad and oil and gas industries, Prohibition, civil rights, and consumer protection. The book is illustrated with more than fifty historical photos, many from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It concludes with a detailed chronology of milestones in the Supreme Court's history and a list, with appointment and election dates, of the more than 150 justices who have served on the Court since 1836.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292744585 20160615
Book
xxvi, 235 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • The research process and legal analysis
  • Online legal research
  • Constitutional law
  • Court systems and judicial opinions
  • Researching judicial opinions
  • Statutory research
  • Bill tracking and legislative history
  • Administrative law
  • Updating with citators
  • Secondary sources.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 366 p. : ill., maps ; 27 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Creating Texas law, 1718-1864
  • Law and crises, 1865-1920
  • Land, oil, water, and sea : the law of Texas
  • The railroad and other corporations
  • Family law and cultural change
  • The legal profession, legal education, and the courts
  • Criminal Law and civil rights
  • Civil procedure, civil remedies, and civil law
  • Conclusion.
Michael Ariens proves that no state possesses a richer or more surprising legal history than Texas. In narrative as engaging as it is accessible, he has produced an overarching consideration of Lone Star law and legal culture--something notably missing in other Texas histories. After taking readers chronologically from early settlement through 1920, Ariens focuses on particular areas of Texas law, including property, family, business, criminal, and civil harms (tort), and on the history of Texas's legal profession itself. Through illuminating and utterly Texan particulars, Ariens helps us understand a place at once southern and western, Spanish and Mexican, republic and state.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780896726956 20160607
Law Library (Crown)
Book
182, [27] pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxv, 217 p. : maps ; 23 cm.
  • The development of Spain and Castilian law
  • Las siete partidas
  • Family law in the partidas
  • The transfer of Castilian laws to new Spain
  • The Spanish legal system arrives in Texas
  • Women's status in case law from San Fernando de Béxar
  • The impact of English history on the development of English common law
  • The application of Spanish and English laws to Anglo-American settlers in Mexican Texas
  • The creation of the Republic of Texas and its legal system
  • The state of Texas and its legal system.
In the mid-1700s, in the tiny villa of San Fernando de Bexar, on the northern fringes of the Spanish Empire in North America, Hispanic women had legal rights that would have astonished their British counterparts half a continent to the east. Under Spanish law, even in the sparsely settled land that would one day become Texas, married women could own property in their own names. They could control and manage not only their own property but even that of their husbands. And if their property rights were infringed, they could seek redress in the courts. --from the introductionThrough court cases and legal documents, Hers, His, and Theirs explores the evolution of Castilian law during the Spanish Reconquest and how those laws came to the New World and Texas. Looking carefully at why the Spanish legal system developed so differently from any other European system and why it survived in Texas even after settlement by Anglos in the 1830s, Jean A. Stuntz discusses what this system of community property offered that English common law did not, and why this aspect of married women's property rights has not been well studied.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780896727175 20160605
Green Library