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Book
xxii, 391 pages ; 25 cm
  • The murder of Courtney Smith
  • The murder of Christine Jackson
  • Investigating the dead
  • At the hands of persons unknown
  • Setting the stage for the cadaver king
  • Rise of a fiefdom
  • The West phenomenon
  • Entrenchment
  • The trial of Levon Brooks
  • Keep that woman under control
  • Vessels of wrath, fitted for destruction
  • Prayers for relief
  • The unraveling
  • Redemption and insurrection
  • No reckoning.
This is a tale of two tragedies. At the heart of the first is Dr. Steven Hayne, a doctor the State of Mississippi employed as its de facto medical examiner for two decades. Beginning in the late 1980s, he performed anywhere from 1,200 to 1,800 autopsies per year, five times more than is recommended, all at night, in the basement of a local morgue and flower shop. Autopsy reports claimed organs had been observed and weighed when, in reality, they had been surgically removed from the body years before. But Hayne was the only game in town. He also often brought in local dentist and self-styled "bite mark specialist" Dr. Michael West, who would discover marks on victim's bodies, at times invisible to the naked eye, and then match those marks to law enforcement's lead suspect. This leads to the second tragic tale: that of Kennedy Brewer and Levon Brooks, two black men each convicted in separate cases of the brutal rape and murder of young girls. Dr. Hayne's autopsy and Dr. West's bite mark matching formed the bases for the convictions. Combined the two men served over 30 years in Mississippi's notorious penitentiary - Parchman Farm - before being exonerated in 2008. Brooks' and Brewer's wrongful convictions lie at the intersection of both the most pressing problem facing this country's criminal justice system - structural injustice built on the historic foundation of race and class as well as with the much more contemporary but equally egregious problem of invalid forensic science. The old problem is inextricably bound up with and exacerbates the new. In Dr. Death and the Country Dentist, Radley Balko and Tucker Carrington write a true story of Southern gothic horror--of two innocent men wrongly convicted of vicious crimes and the legally condoned failures that allowed it to happen. Balko and Carrington will shine a light on the institutional and professional failures that allowed this tragic, astonishing story to happen, identify where it may have happened elsewhere, and show how to prevent it from happening again.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781610396912 20180409
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 294 pages ; 24 cm
  • Prologue
  • Introduction and overview
  • The bourbon elites
  • Opposition to the bourbons
  • Calling the convention
  • The convention debates the franchise
  • The convention adopts the understanding clause
  • The convention considers reform agendas
  • The convention exposes class divisions
  • Defending the new constitution in congress
  • Defending the new constitution in the federal courts
  • Conclusion.
In 1890, Mississippi called a convention to rewrite its constitution. That convention became the singular event that marked the state's transition from the nineteenth century to the twentieth and set the path for the state for decades to come. The primary purpose of the convention was to disfranchise African American voters as well as some poor whites. The result was a document that transformed the state for the next century. In Sowing the Wind, Dorothy Overstreet Pratt traces the decision to call that convention, examines the delegates' decisions, and analyzes the impact of their new constitution. Pratt argues the constitution produced a new social structure, which pivoted the state's culture from a class-based system to one centered upon race. Though state leaders had not anticipated this change, they were savvy in their manipulation of the issues. The new constitution effectively filled the goal of disfranchisement. Moreover, unlike the constitutions of many other southern states, it held up against attack for over seventy years. It also hindered the state socially and economically well into the twentieth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781496815460 20180122
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (1 volume (various pagings)).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiii, 189 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction to legal research
  • Legal research as a process
  • Secondary sources
  • Judicial opinions
  • Case law research
  • Statutes
  • Legislative process and legislative history
  • Administrative law
  • Constitutions
  • Law of evidence and rules of court, including rules of professional conduct
  • Appendix A: Basics of citation
  • Appendix B: Basics of full-text searching on Lexis Advance, Westlaw, and Bloomberg Law.
"[This book] has been extensively revised to outline a process of effective and efficient legal research that may incorporate print resources, free Internet resources, and commercial platforms. Introductory chapters discuss the importance of legal research in legal problem solving, strategies for locating relevant primary and secondary authority, and ways to evaluate research findings. Following these introductory chapters, [the author] discusses legal secondary sources, and then addresses Massachusetts primary sources and techniques for using them with chapters on judicial opinions, statutes, administrative law, constitutions, and rules of court. An additional chapter discusses the legislative process. The book includes concise descriptions of federal sources and appendixes on full-text searching and citation."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
2 volumes (loose-leaf) : forms ; 26 cm
  • Volume I. Choice of entity and incorporation / Arthur B. Page, Charles R. Platt
  • Filing and reporting requirements / Amy R. Segal
  • Qualifying for tax exemption / Elka T. Sachs
  • Preparing IRS forms 1023, 1023EZ, and 1024 / Susan M. (Sandy) Tarrant, Anita S. Lichtblau
  • Duties and liabilities of directors and officers / Sharon C. Lincoln
  • Limiting liability and risk of directors and officers / Frederic J. Marx
  • Board function and composition: practical considerations / Nancy B. Gardiner
  • Employment law and employee benefits / Frederick L. Sullivan, Layla G. Taylor
  • Regulation of public charities and fundraising / Richard A. Sugarman
  • Limitations on lobbying and political activities / Oliver F. Ames, Renat V. Lumpau
  • Unrelated business income / Charles Fayerweather
  • Volume II. Property tax exemptions / Tad Heuer, Sandra Shapiro
  • Tax-exempt financing / David R. Sullivan
  • Reorganizations and dissolutions / Jack A. Eiferman
  • Special issues for health-care nonprofits / Kenneth R. Appleby, Dianne J. Bourque, Ellen L. Janos, M. Daria Niewenhous, Donald W. Schroeder, Bruce D. Sokler, Stephen M. Weiner
  • Administering a private foundation / Sarah T. Connolly, Annette K. Eaton
  • Management of endowment and institutional funds / Christopnher A. Klem, Carolyn O. Ward
  • Nonprofits in trouble : receiverships and bankruptcy / Jack A. Eiferman
  • Conversion from nonprofit to for-profit status / Charles R. Buck, Christopher M. Jedrey, Edward G. Zacharias.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiii, 163 pages ; 23 cm.
  • The research process and legal analysis
  • Judicial opinions
  • Enacted law
  • Legislative history
  • Administrative law
  • Secondary sources
  • Research strategies
  • Legal citation.
"In addition to updating all sources discussed, this edition...focuses on free legal resources, including current commercial and government sources. For the free online sources, this edition includes directions on how to navigate the website to make it easy for the reader to find the relevant information. Where applicable, references to new and established subscription-based resources are juxtaposed against those resources that are available for free. The goal is to help the reader make an informed decision regarding when to use a fee-based service as opposed to a free legal resource. This edition continues to draw upon the authors' years of experience teaching legal writing and research by providing the tools for conducting efficient and effective legal research, as well as discussing the interplay between legal research and legal analysis."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (1 volume (various pagings)).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, 288 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Searching for rights in Missouri history / Kenneth H. Winn
  • Testing the limits of American justice : Indian trials in nineteenth-century Missouri / William E. Foley
  • The frown of fortune : George Sibley, breach of promise, and Anglo-Francophone conflict on the Missouri frontier / Kenneth H. Winn
  • The politics of slavery and Missouri's first elected Supreme Court : Dred Scott v. Emerson / Paul Finkelman
  • The Judicial Ouster Ordinance of 1865 and radical reconstruction in Missouri / Dennis W. Belcher
  • Disfranchised and degraded : Virginia L. Minor and the constitutional case for women's suffrage / Bonnie Stepenoff
  • Missouri's long road to juvenile justice / Douglas E. Abrams
  • The living example : Laurence M. Hyde and the Missouri nonpartisan court plan / Kenneth H. Winn
  • Constitutional mollycoddling : how women won the right to serve as jurors in Missouri (but only if they wanted to) / Karen Anderson Winn
  • Shaking the shackles : Curt Flood's challenge to baseball's reserve clause / James R. Devine
  • In the midst of all such excitement : the Nancy Cruzan case / Edward "Chip" Robertson, Jr.
Until recently, many of Missouri's legal records were inaccessible and the existence of many influential, historic cases was unknown. The ten essays in this volume showcase Missouri as both maker and microcosm of American history. Some of the topics are famous: Dred Scott's slave freedom suit, Virginia Minor's women's suffrage case, Curt Flood's suit against professional baseball, and the Nancy Cruzan "right to die" case. Other essays cover court cases concerning the uneasy incorporation of ethnic and cultural populations into the United States; political loyalty tests during the Civil War; the alleviation of cruelty to poor and criminally institutionalized children; the barring of women to serve on juries decades after they could vote; and the creation of the "Missouri Court Plan, " a national model for judicial selection.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826220691 20160928
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vi, 288 pages ; 24 cm
Until recently, many of Missouri's legal records were inaccessible and the existence of many influential, historic cases was unknown. The ten essays in this volume showcase Missouri as both maker and microcosm of American history. Some of the topics are famous: Dred Scott's slave freedom suit, Virginia Minor's women's suffrage case, Curt Flood's suit against professional baseball, and the Nancy Cruzan "right to die" case. Other essays cover court cases concerning the uneasy incorporation of ethnic and cultural populations into the United States; political loyalty tests during the Civil War; the alleviation of cruelty to poor and criminally institutionalized children; the barring of women to serve on juries decades after they could vote; and the creation of the "Missouri Court Plan, " a national model for judicial selection.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826220691 20160704
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (1 volume (various pagings)).
Law Library (Crown)

11. The Boston trustee [2015]

Book
173 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • The donor : John McLean
  • The trust document
  • The Boston trustee
  • Origins of the Boston Trustee
  • The property : economic and social backdrop
  • The beneficiary : control and care
  • The law
  • Trust investments
  • The trustee
  • Massachusetts lawyer trustees
  • Competitive landscape
  • Individual and corporate trustees : a comparison
  • The Franklin fund
  • Codicil
  • Current Boston trustees
  • Conclusion.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (327 pages)
Book
xxix, 188 pages ; 23 cm.
  • The legal research process
  • Constitutions and statutes
  • Case reporters and digests
  • Administrative law
  • Citators
  • Secondary sources
  • Legislative history and legislation
  • Online research
  • Research strategies and organizing research.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 398 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: An Old Valuables Chest -- Chapter One: Satan's Storm -- Chapter Two: The City upon a Hill -- Chapter Three: Drawing Battle Lines in Salem Village -- Chapter Four: The Afflicted -- Chapter Five: The Accused -- Chapter Six: The Judges -- Chapter Seven: An Inextinguishable Flame -- Chapter Eight: Salem End -- Chapter Nine: Witch City?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199890347 20160618
Beginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers-mainly young women-suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. The resulting Salem Witch Trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history. Historians have speculated on a web of possible causes for the witchcraft that stated in Salem and spread across the region-religious crisis, ergot poisoning, an encephalitis outbreak, frontier war hysteria-but most agree that there was no single factor. Rather, as Emerson Baker illustrates in this seminal new work, Salem was "a perfect storm": a unique convergence of conditions and events that produced something extraordinary throughout New England in 1692 and the following years, and which has haunted us ever since. Baker shows how a range of factors in the Bay colony in the 1690s, including a new charter and government, a lethal frontier war, and religious and political conflicts, set the stage for the dramatic events in Salem. Engaging a range of perspectives, he looks at the key players in the outbreak-the accused witches and the people they allegedly bewitched, as well as the judges and government officials who prosecuted them-and wrestles with questions about why the Salem tragedy unfolded as it did, and why it has become an enduring legacy. Salem in 1692 was a critical moment for the fading Puritan government of Massachusetts Bay, whose attempts to suppress the story of the trials and erase them from memory only fueled the popular imagination. Baker argues that the trials marked a turning point in colonial history from Puritan communalism to Yankee independence, from faith in collective conscience to skepticism toward moral governance. A brilliantly told tale, A Storm of Witchcraft also puts Salem's storm into its broader context as a part of the ongoing narrative of American history and the history of the Atlantic World.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199890347 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 398 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: An Old Valuables Chest -- Chapter One: Satan's Storm -- Chapter Two: The City upon a Hill -- Chapter Three: Drawing Battle Lines in Salem Village -- Chapter Four: The Afflicted -- Chapter Five: The Accused -- Chapter Six: The Judges -- Chapter Seven: An Inextinguishable Flame -- Chapter Eight: Salem End -- Chapter Nine: Witch City?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199890347 20160618
Beginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers-mainly young women-suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. The resulting Salem Witch Trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history. Historians have speculated on a web of possible causes for the witchcraft that stated in Salem and spread across the region-religious crisis, ergot poisoning, an encephalitis outbreak, frontier war hysteria-but most agree that there was no single factor. Rather, as Emerson Baker illustrates in this seminal new work, Salem was "a perfect storm": a unique convergence of conditions and events that produced something extraordinary throughout New England in 1692 and the following years, and which has haunted us ever since. Baker shows how a range of factors in the Bay colony in the 1690s, including a new charter and government, a lethal frontier war, and religious and political conflicts, set the stage for the dramatic events in Salem. Engaging a range of perspectives, he looks at the key players in the outbreak-the accused witches and the people they allegedly bewitched, as well as the judges and government officials who prosecuted them-and wrestles with questions about why the Salem tragedy unfolded as it did, and why it has become an enduring legacy. Salem in 1692 was a critical moment for the fading Puritan government of Massachusetts Bay, whose attempts to suppress the story of the trials and erase them from memory only fueled the popular imagination. Baker argues that the trials marked a turning point in colonial history from Puritan communalism to Yankee independence, from faith in collective conscience to skepticism toward moral governance. A brilliantly told tale, A Storm of Witchcraft also puts Salem's storm into its broader context as a part of the ongoing narrative of American history and the history of the Atlantic World.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199890347 20160618
Green Library
Book
xiii, 235 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface
  • Day one
  • Deviating from the norm
  • Investigating the scene
  • Day two
  • Day three
  • Day four
  • Blaming the victim?
  • Day five
  • The changing story of cigarillos
  • Watching
  • The people
  • The demon and the gentle giant
  • An officer of the law
  • Day twenty-three
  • Day twenty-four
  • Afterword
  • Epilogue.
"The death of Michael Brown, Jr., in Ferguson, Missouri, on August 9, 2014, has become a touchstone for reform in three areas of American society: the high incidence of black citizens killed by white policemen; the pattern and effect of systemic racism in the country's criminal justice system; the need for study and reform of current federal and state grand jury systems. [This book] illustrates the pitfalls of the grand jury system by inviting readers to take a seat with the 12 people selected as grand jurors in the Michael Brown case, and to share the evidence and process they went through. Details that were not openly or adequately questioned are highlighted, and the impact of the posture and attitude of the prosecuting attorneys is explored. Disparities are uncovered in the narrative of Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who was responsible for Brown's death, and the process of informing, or misinforming, jury members regarding the law(s) governing their deliberations is given critical attention. Ultimately, throughout the 24 days of testimony, the deeply human side of this tragedy is shared. And measured against the history of the grand jury process itself, this is a case study illustrating the need for examination and reform."-- Back cover.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource
  • Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Preface to the New Edition; Acknowledgments; Chronology; Players; Prologue; ONE: A Certain Tract of Land; TWO: Owners and Outcasts; THREE: Should Trees Have Standing?; FOUR: The Cords of Christ's Tent; FIVE: To Have and to Hold; SIX: Common Ground; SEVEN: Cross-Lot Walking; EIGHT: Terra Nullius; NINE: Holding Ground; TEN: Out of the Quiver of the Scriptures; ELEVEN: The Last of the Commons; TWELVE: Islands of the Dead; THIRTEEN: Who Really Owns North America?; FOURTEEN: The Tawny Vermin; FIFTEEN: Their Heirs and Assigns Forever.
  • SIXTEEN: The Intelligence of SalamandersSEVENTEEN: The Landing; EIGHTEEN: Drawn and Quartered; Epilogue.
Trespassing, "a thoughtful, beautifully written addition to environmental and regional literature" (Kirkus Reviews), is a historical survey of the evolution of private ownership of land, concentrating on the various land uses of a 500-acre tract of land over a 350-year period. What began as wild land controlled periodically by various Native American tribes became British crown land after 1654, then private property under US law, and finally common land again in the late twentieth century. Mitchell considers every aspect of the important issue of land ownership and explores how our attitudes toward land have changed over the centuries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611687194 20180521
Book
xiv, 498 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (chiefly color), portraits, facsimiles ; 25 cm
Green Library
Book
vii, 302 pages ; 24 cm
"No state ...shall deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws." So says the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution, a document held dear by Carl Cohen, a professor of philosophy and longtime champion of civil liberties who has devoted most of his adult life to the University of Michigan. So when Cohen discovered, after encountering some resistance, how his school, in its admirable wish to increase minority enrollment, was actually practicing a form of racial discrimination--calling it "affirmative action"--he found himself at odds with his longtime allies and colleagues in an effort to defend the equal treatment of the races at his university. In A Conflict of Principles Cohen tells the story of what happened at Michigan, how racial preferences were devised and implemented there, and what was at stake in the heated and divisive controversy that ensued. He gives voice to the judicious and seldom heard liberal argument against affirmative action in college admission policies. In the early 1970s, as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Civil Liberties Union, Cohen vigorously supported programs devised to encourage the recruitment of minorities in colleges, and in private employment. But some of these efforts gave deliberate preference to blacks and Hispanics seeking university admission, and this Cohen recognized as a form of racism, however well-meaning. In his book he recounts the fortunes of contested affirmative action programs as they made their way through the legal system to the Supreme Court, beginning with DeFunis v. Odegaard (1974) at the University of Washington Law School, then Bakke v. Regents of the University of California (1978) at the Medical School on the UC Davis campus, and culminating at the University of Michigan in the landmark cases of Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger (2003). He recounts his role in the initiation of the Michigan cases, explaining the many arguments against racial preferences in college admissions. He presents a principled case for the resultant amendment to the Michigan constitution, of which he was a prominent advocate, which prohibited preference by race in public employment and public contracting, as well as in public education. An eminently readable personal, consistently fair-minded account of the principles and politics that come into play in the struggles over affirmative action, A Conflict of Principles is a deeply thoughtful and thought-provoking contribution to our national conversation about race.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780700619962 20160617
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (250 pages)