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Book
1 online resource (1 volume (various pagings)).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 169 pages ; 23 cm
  • The plight of Frank Johnson
  • The politics of transfer
  • The creation of convict lease
  • The triumph of the redeemers
  • The whisper in the crowd
  • The burden of precedent
  • The vagaries of due process
  • The decision in Johnson
  • The ghost in the machine
  • The trial of Derrick Todd Lee
  • Epilogue.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 266 pages : portraits ; 25 cm
  • The justices of the Supreme Court of Louisiana
  • Justice Zenon Labauve
  • Justice John Henry Ilsley
  • Governor Hahn resigns
  • Justice William Bryan Hyman
  • Justice Robert Byron Jones
  • Justice Rufus King Howell
  • The 1865 Court
  • Justice James Govan Taliaferro
  • The 1865 Court with Justice Taliaferro
  • Louisiana's 1868 Constitution
  • Justice John Theodore Ludeling
  • Justice William Wirt Howe
  • Justice William Gillespie Wyly
  • The 1868 court
  • 1872 politics
  • Justice John Hanson Kennard
  • The 1868 Court with Justice Kennard
  • Justice Philip Hickey Morgan
  • The 1868 Court with Justice Morgan
  • Justice John Edward Leonard
  • The 1868 Court with Justice Leonard
  • Justice John Edward King
  • 1877 politics
  • Justice Robert Hardin Marr
  • Justice Thomas Courtland Manning
  • Justice Alcibiades DeBlanc
  • Justice William Brainerd Spencer
  • Justice William B. Giles Egan
  • The 1877 Court
  • Eighteen men.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
34 leaves ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 249 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • The gulf and its city
  • A legal system in flux
  • "We shall serve with fidelity and zeal"
  • Outside the bonds of matrimony
  • Owning so as not to be owned
  • When the question Is slavery or freedom?
  • Epilogue: From Adele to Plessy
No American city's history better illustrates both the possibilities for alternative racial models and the role of the law in shaping racial identity than New Orleans, Louisiana, which prior to the Civil War was home to America's most privileged community of people of African descent. In the eyes of the law, New Orleans' free people of color did not belong to the same race as enslaved Africans and African-Americans. While slaves were "negroes, " free people of color were gens de couleur libre, creoles of color, or simply creoles. New Orleans' creoles of color remained legally and culturally distinct from "negroes" throughout most of the nineteenth century until state mandated segregation lumped together descendants of slaves with descendants of free people of color. Much of the recent scholarship on New Orleans examines what race relations in the antebellum period looked as well as why antebellum Louisiana's gens de couleur enjoyed rights and privileges denied to free blacks throughout most of the United States. This book, however, is less concerned with the what and why questions than with how people of color, acting within institutions of power, shaped those institutions in ways beyond their control. As its title suggests, Making Race in the Courtroom argues that race is best understood not as a category, but as a process. It seeks to demonstrate the role of free people of African-descent, interacting within the courts, in this process.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814724316 20160617
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxv, 229 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
  • Fundamental principles of legal research
  • Overview of the legal research process and citation
  • Researching enacted law: constitutions, statutes, and rules
  • Bill tracking and researching legislative history
  • Judicial systems and judicial opinions
  • Researching judicial opinions: digests and other finding tools and strategies
  • Researching administrative law and other executive documents
  • Updating
  • Finding and updating secondary sources
  • Online legal research
  • Research efficiency and organization.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvi, 196 p. : ill, map ; 24 cm
  • The authors and origins of the Code Noir
  • War without arms : the customs of slavery
  • The strange science of codifying slavery : Moreau Lislet and the Louisiana digest of 1808
  • Slave law under digest and code 1808-1860 : systematic thinking and classical learning
  • Appendix Code Noir of 1724 (in French and English) ; Translation by Vernon Valentine Palmer.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 391 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
  • Contents Introduction-- Chapter 1: The Origins of Federal Acknowledgment Policy-- Chapter 2: The Tunica-Biloxi Tribe's Early Recognition Efforts-- Chapter 3: Tunica Activism from the Termination Era to the Self-Determination Era-- Chapter 4: Treasures: Tunica-Biloxi in the Federal Recognition Era-- Chapter 5: Tribal Enterprise and Tribal Life-- Chapter 6: Jena Choctaws Under Jim Crow and Outside the Federal Purview-- Chapter 7: Jena Choctaw Persistence from World War II to Recognition-- Chapter 8: Jena Choctaw Recognition-- Chapter 9: On the Outside, Looking In: Clifton-Choctaws, Race, and Federal Acknowledgment-- Chapter 10: Conclusions and Implications Appendix-- Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822349846 20160605
In Recognition Odysseys, Brian Klopotek illuminates the complex relationship between federal tribal recognition policy and American Indian racial and tribal identities. He does so by comparing the experiences of three central Louisiana tribes that have petitioned for federal acknowledgment: the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe (recognized in 1981), the Jena Band of Choctaw Indians (recognized in 1995), and the Clifton-Choctaws (currently seeking recognition). Though recognition has acquired a transformational aura, seemingly able to lift tribes from poverty and cultural decay to wealth and revitalization, the cases of these three groups reveals a more complex reality. Klopotek describes the varied effects of the recognition process on each tribe's social and political structures, community cohesion, cultural revitalization projects, identity, and economic health. He emphasizes that recognition policy is not the only racial project affecting Louisiana tribes. For the Tunica-Biloxis, the Jena Band of Choctaws, and the Clifton-Choctaws, discourses around blackness and whiteness have shaped the boundaries of Indian identity in ways that have only begun to be explored. Klopotek urges scholars and officials from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to acknowledge the multiple discourses and viewpoints influencing tribal identities. At the same time, he puts tribal recognition in broader perspective. Indigenous struggles began long before the BIA existed, and they will continue long after it renders any particular recognition decision.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822349846 20160605
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxv, 223 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • Fundamental principles of legal research
  • Overview of the legal research process and citation
  • Researching enacted law : constitutions, statutes, and rules
  • Bill tracking and researching legislative history
  • Judicial systems and judicial opinions
  • Researching judicial opinions : digests and other finding tools and strategies
  • Researching administrative law and other executive documents
  • Updating
  • Finding and updating secondary sources
  • Online legal research
  • Research strategies and organization.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 192 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Covenant marriage and the marriage movement
  • Covenant marriage in Louisiana : legal and historical background
  • The implementation of covenant marriage in Louisiana
  • Who wants a covenant marriage?
  • The role of religion in covenant and standard marriages
  • The ongoing marriage
  • Divorce, religiosity and counseling.
Regardless how you interpret the statistics, the divorce rate in the United States is staggering. But, what if the government could change this? Would families be better off if new public policies made it more difficult for couples to separate?This book explores a movement that emerged over the past fifteen years, which aims to do just that. Guided by certain politicians and religious leaders who herald marriage as a solution to a range of longstanding social problems, a handful of state governments enacted "covenant marriage" laws, which require couples to choose between a conventional and a covenant marriage. While the familiar type of union requires little effort to enter and can be terminated by either party unilaterally, covenant marriage requires premarital counseling, an agreement bound by fault-based rules or lengthy waiting periods to exit, and a legal stipulation that divorce can be granted only after the couple has received counseling.Drawing on interviews with over 700 couples - half of whom have chosen covenant unions - this book not only evaluates the viability of public policy in the intimate affairs of marriage, it also explores how growing public discourse is causing men and women to rethink the meaning of marriage.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813543253 20160528
Green Library
Book
xv, 192 p. : forms ; 24 cm.
  • Covenant marriage and the marriage movement
  • Covenant marriage in Louisiana : legal and historical background
  • The implementation of covenant marriage in Louisiana
  • Who wants a covenant marriage?
  • The role of religion in covenant and standard marriages / with Jill A. Deines
  • The ongoing marriage
  • Divorce, religiosity, and counseling.
Regardless how you interpret the statistics, the divorce rate in the United States is staggering. But, what if the government could change this? Would families be better off if new public policies made it more difficult for couples to separate?This book explores a movement that emerged over the past fifteen years, which aims to do just that. Guided by certain politicians and religious leaders who herald marriage as a solution to a range of longstanding social problems, a handful of state governments enacted "covenant marriage" laws, which require couples to choose between a conventional and a covenant marriage. While the familiar type of union requires little effort to enter and can be terminated by either party unilaterally, covenant marriage requires premarital counseling, an agreement bound by fault-based rules or lengthy waiting periods to exit, and a legal stipulation that divorce can be granted only after the couple has received counseling.Drawing on interviews with over 700 couples - half of whom have chosen covenant unions - this book not only evaluates the viability of public policy in the intimate affairs of marriage, it also explores how growing public discourse is causing men and women to rethink the meaning of marriage.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813543253 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown)
Book
39 p. ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
p. 719-1123 ; 26 cm.
  • Louisiana land reform in the storms' aftermath / Frank S. Alexander
  • Housing redevelopment strategies in the wake of Katrina and anti-Kelo constitutional amendments : mapping a path through the landscape of disaster / David A. Marcello
  • Abating Katrina's second wave : a strategy for using code enforcement to target unoccupied nuisance and blighted property in post-disaster New Orleans / Jeffrey Thomas
  • Post-hurricane demolition in the city of New Orleans : when is a house no longer a home? / Davida Finger.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
62 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiII, 284 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm.
  • Setting the scene : Louisiana 1803-1812
  • Understanding Moreau Lislet
  • The French connection and the Spanish perception
  • The authors and origins of the Code Noir
  • The death of a code : the birth of a digest
  • Celebrating the Quebec codification achievement
  • The collapse of the general clause
  • The many guises of equity in a mixed jurisdiction.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 135 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Frenchmen and Spaniards
  • Courts and the "Clash of cultures," 1803-1812
  • Order and chaos : organizing the early Supreme Court
  • Creating a common law
  • The Phoenix : Edward Livingston and codification in the 1820s.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 135 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Frenchmen and Spaniards : the Colonial Period
  • Courts and the "Clash of cultures," 1803-1812 : the territory of Orleans
  • Order and chaos : organizing the early Supreme Court
  • Creating a common law
  • The Phoenix : Edward Livingston and codification in the 1820s
  • From chaos to continuity : early reforms.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 224 p. ; 23 cm.
  • A course of legal studies / Warren M. Billings
  • "The people's friend, the tyrant's foe" / Florence M. Jumonville
  • Case law reporters in nineteenth-century Louisiana / Carla Downer Pritchett
  • Local justice in the territory of Orleans / Mark F. Fernandez
  • Louisiana's Court of Errors and Appeals, 1843-1846 / Sheridan E. Young
  • Of generals and jurists : the judicial system of New Orleans under Union occupation, May 1862-April 1865 / Thomas W. Helis
  • "Forever free from the bonds of slavery" / Judith Kelleher Schafer
  • Defiant women and the Supreme Court of Louisiana in the nineteenth century / Kathryn Page
  • Imperfect equality / Ellen Holmes Pearson.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
34 leaves ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)