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Book
xv, 270 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • Illinois before statehood : slave country of the Northwest Territory
  • The constitution of 1818 : slavery, a bogus census, feeble executive power
  • Black codes and bondage, settling the North, legislative follies
  • The constitution of 1848 : reconstructing government, balancing powers, oppressing free blacks
  • Two transformative decades : 1848-1868
  • Civil War, a partisan convention, the decisive later 1860s
  • The constitution of 1870 : progressive foundation for a century.
In its early days, Illinois seemed destined to extend the American South. Its population of transplants lived an upland southern culture and in some cases owned slaves. Yet the nineteenth century and three constitutions recast Illinois as a crucible of northern strength and American progress. Frank Cicero Jr. provides an appealing new history of Illinois as expressed by the state's constitutions-and the lively conventions that led to each one. In Creating the Land of Lincoln, Cicero sheds light on the vital debates of delegates who, freed from electoral necessity, revealed the opinions, prejudices, sentiments, and dreams of Illinoisans at critical junctures in state history. Cicero simultaneously analyzes decisions large and small that fostered momentous social and political changes. The addition of northern land in the 1818 constitution, for instance, opened up the state to immigrant populations that reoriented Illinois to the north. Legislative abuses and rancor over free blacks influenced the 1848 document and the subsequent rise of a Republican Party that gave the nation Abraham Lincoln as its president. Cicero concludes with the 1870 constitution, revealing how its dialogues and resolutions set the state on the modern course that still endures today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252041679 20180611
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource
  • Illinois before Statehood: Slave Country of the Northwest Territory
  • The Constitution of 1818: Slavery, a Bogus Census, Feeble Executive Power
  • Black Codes and Bondage, Settling the North, Legislative Follies
  • The Constitution of 1848: Reconstructing Government, Balancing Powers, Oppressing Free Blacks
  • 1848-1868: Two Transformative Decades
  • Civil War, a Partisan Convention, the Decisive Later 1860s.
  • The Constitution of 1870: Progressive Foundation for a Century
"Creating the Land of Lincoln: The Forgotten History of Illinois tells the development of Illinois through the history of its 19th century constitutions. Illinois in the early 19th century was essentially a southern state sympathetic to slavery. Boundary changes written into the 1818 constitution that added a large land area in the north and a rapidly growing population immigrating from the north and east pushed the state's political trajectory northward. The debates about slavery changed, with intensified concern about the presence of free blacks, and legislative abuses grew, leading to the 1848 document. That process accelerated through the eighteen fifties, Lincoln's presidency, and the Civil War, resulting in the progressive 1870s constitution. In Creating the Land of Lincoln, Frank Cicero, Jr. takes a fresh look at generally neglected aspects of Illinois's political history, offering new insights into Abraham Lincoln, slavery, and Illinois politics as we approach the states 200th anniversary. It covers the period from 1673 to 1870, the year the third Illinois Constitution went into effect to last for 100 years. The events of that early period, and the three 19th century constitutions that reflected them, enabled the election of Abraham Lincoln and shaped the Illinois of the subsequent 150 years"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 337 pages ; 25 cm.
  • The history of the Iowa constitution
  • Preamble and boundaries
  • Article I : Bill of rights
  • Article II : right of suffrage
  • Article III : of the distribution of powers
  • Article IV : executive department
  • Article V : judicial department
  • Article VI : militia
  • Article VII : state debts
  • Article VIII : corporations
  • Article IX : education and school lands
  • Article X : amendments to the Constitution
  • Article XI : miscellaneous
  • Article XII : schedule.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 252 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Opening the courthouse doors
  • Separate and unequal justice
  • Of monsters and mopes : racial and criminal "immorality"
  • Race in everyday legal practices
  • There are no racists here : prosecutors in the criminal courts
  • Rethinking Gideon's army : defense attorneys in the criminal courts
  • Conclusion: Racialized punishment in the courts : a call to action.
Americans are slowly waking up to the dire effects of racial profiling, police brutality, and mass incarceration, especially in disadvantaged neighborhoods and communities of color. The criminal courts are the crucial gateway between police action on the street and the processing of primarily black and Latino defendants into jails and prisons. And yet the courts, often portrayed as sacred, impartial institutions, have remained shrouded in secrecy, with the majority of Americans kept in the dark about how they function internally. Crook County bursts open the courthouse doors and enters the hallways, courtrooms, judges' chambers, and attorneys' offices to reveal a world of punishment determined by race, not offense.Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve spent ten years working in and investigating the largest criminal courthouse in the country, Chicago-Cook County, and based on over 1,000 hours of observation, she takes readers inside our so-called halls of justice to witness the types of everyday racial abuses that fester within the courts, often in plain sight. We watch white courtroom professionals classify and deliberate on the fates of mostly black and Latino defendants while racial abuse and due process violations are encouraged and even seen as justified. Judges fall asleep on the bench. Prosecutors hang out like frat boys in the judges' chambers while the fates of defendants hang in the balance. Public defenders make choices about which defendants they will try to "save" and which they will sacrifice. Sheriff's officers cruelly mock and abuse defendants' family members. Crook County's powerful and at times devastating narratives reveal startling truths about a legal culture steeped in racial abuse. Defendants find themselves thrust into a pernicious legal world where courtroom actors live and breathe racism while simultaneously committing themselves to a colorblind ideal. Van Cleve urges all citizens to take a closer look at the way we do justice in America and to hold our arbiters of justice accountable to the highest standards of equality.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804790437 20160919
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 252 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction : opening the courthouse doors
  • Separate and unequal justice
  • Of monsters and mopes : racial and criminal "immorality"
  • Race in everyday legal practices
  • There are no racists here : prosecutors in the criminal courts
  • Rethinking Gideon's army : defense attorneys in the criminal courts
  • Conclusion : racialized punishment in the courts : a call to action.
Americans are slowly waking up to the dire effects of racial profiling, police brutality, and mass incarceration, especially in disadvantaged neighborhoods and communities of color. The criminal courts are the crucial gateway between police action on the street and the processing of primarily black and Latino defendants into jails and prisons. And yet the courts, often portrayed as sacred, impartial institutions, have remained shrouded in secrecy, with the majority of Americans kept in the dark about how they function internally. Crook County bursts open the courthouse doors and enters the hallways, courtrooms, judges' chambers, and attorneys' offices to reveal a world of punishment determined by race, not offense.Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve spent ten years working in and investigating the largest criminal courthouse in the country, Chicago-Cook County, and based on over 1,000 hours of observation, she takes readers inside our so-called halls of justice to witness the types of everyday racial abuses that fester within the courts, often in plain sight. We watch white courtroom professionals classify and deliberate on the fates of mostly black and Latino defendants while racial abuse and due process violations are encouraged and even seen as justified. Judges fall asleep on the bench. Prosecutors hang out like frat boys in the judges' chambers while the fates of defendants hang in the balance. Public defenders make choices about which defendants they will try to "save" and which they will sacrifice. Sheriff's officers cruelly mock and abuse defendants' family members. Crook County's powerful and at times devastating narratives reveal startling truths about a legal culture steeped in racial abuse. Defendants find themselves thrust into a pernicious legal world where courtroom actors live and breathe racism while simultaneously committing themselves to a colorblind ideal. Van Cleve urges all citizens to take a closer look at the way we do justice in America and to hold our arbiters of justice accountable to the highest standards of equality.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804790437 20160704
Green Library
Journal/Periodical
volumes ; 26 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxviii, 291 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • The research process and legal analysis
  • Legal research sources and techniques
  • Secondary sources
  • The constitution
  • Judicial opinions, reporters, and digests
  • Statutes, court rules, and ordinances
  • Legislative history
  • Administrative law
  • Updating with citators
  • Practice aids
  • Legal ethics
  • Research strategies.
"The goal [of this book] is to make the complex process of legal research understandable and accessible. Outlines of the research process and examples from Iowa resources make the book easy to use. URLs point researchers to where they can find access to free or low-cost legal materials on the web. Screen shots and excerpts are used frequently to help in understanding a resource. In addition to covering Iowa-specific resources, the book discusses how to find applicable federal law...and can be used as a stand-alone text or in conjunction with a research text covering U.S. law. The book begins with an overview of the research process and legal analysis so that the reader can better understand the nature of these complementary components in finding and reviewing the law."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 236 pages, 10 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 23 cm.
oWeAEve been together in sickness and in health, through the death of his mother, through the adoption of our children, through four long years of this legal battle, o Jason Morgan told reporters of himself and his partner, Chuck Swaggerty. oAnd if being together through all of that isnAEt love and commitment or isnAEt family or isnAEt marriage, then I donAEt know what is.o Just minutes earlier on that day, April 3, 2009, the justices of the Iowa Supreme Court had agreed. The courtAEs decision in Varnum v. Brien made Iowa only the third state in the nation to permit same-sex couples to wedumoderate, midwestern Iowa, years before such left-leaning coastal states as California and New York. And unlike the earlier decisions in Massachusetts and Connecticut, Varnum v. Brien was unanimous and unequivocal. It catalyzed the unprecedented and rapid shift in law and public opinion that continues today. Equal Before the Law tells the stories behind this critical battle in the fight for marriage equality and traces the decisionAEs impact. The struggle began in 1998 with the easy passage of IowaAEs Defense of Marriage Act and took a turn, surprising to many, in 2005, when six ordinary Iowa couples signed on to Lambda LegalAEs suit against the law. Their triumph in 2009 sparked a conservative backlash against the supreme court justices, three of whom faced tough retention elections that fall. Longtime, award-winning reporters Tom Witosky and Marc Hansen talked with and researched dozens of key figures, including opponent Bob Vander Plaats, proponents Janelle Rettig and Sharon Malheiro, attorneys Roger Kuhle, Dennis Johnson, and Camilla Taylor, and politicians Matt McCoy, Mary Lundby, and Tom Vilsack, who had to weigh their careers against their convictions. Justice Mark Cady, who wrote the decision, explains why the court had to rule in favor of the plaintiffs. At the center of the story are the six couples who sacrificed their privacy to demand public respect for their families. Through these voices, Witosky and Hansen show that no one should have been surprised by the 2009 decision. Iowans have a long history of leadership on civil rights. Just a year after Iowa became a state, its citizens adopted as their motto the phrase, oOur liberties we prize and our rights we will maintain.o And they still do today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781609383497 20160618
Green Library
Book
xiii, 236 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Injured child
  • Right and wrong
  • Near the truth
  • Two women
  • Legal trifecta
  • Old farts and Rosa Parks
  • All justices concur
  • Decision day ... and beyond
  • We the people
  • Buyer's remorse
  • Enough is enough
  • Iowa.
oWeAEve been together in sickness and in health, through the death of his mother, through the adoption of our children, through four long years of this legal battle, o Jason Morgan told reporters of himself and his partner, Chuck Swaggerty. oAnd if being together through all of that isnAEt love and commitment or isnAEt family or isnAEt marriage, then I donAEt know what is.o Just minutes earlier on that day, April 3, 2009, the justices of the Iowa Supreme Court had agreed. The courtAEs decision in Varnum v. Brien made Iowa only the third state in the nation to permit same-sex couples to wedumoderate, midwestern Iowa, years before such left-leaning coastal states as California and New York. And unlike the earlier decisions in Massachusetts and Connecticut, Varnum v. Brien was unanimous and unequivocal. It catalyzed the unprecedented and rapid shift in law and public opinion that continues today. Equal Before the Law tells the stories behind this critical battle in the fight for marriage equality and traces the decisionAEs impact. The struggle began in 1998 with the easy passage of IowaAEs Defense of Marriage Act and took a turn, surprising to many, in 2005, when six ordinary Iowa couples signed on to Lambda LegalAEs suit against the law. Their triumph in 2009 sparked a conservative backlash against the supreme court justices, three of whom faced tough retention elections that fall. Longtime, award-winning reporters Tom Witosky and Marc Hansen talked with and researched dozens of key figures, including opponent Bob Vander Plaats, proponents Janelle Rettig and Sharon Malheiro, attorneys Roger Kuhle, Dennis Johnson, and Camilla Taylor, and politicians Matt McCoy, Mary Lundby, and Tom Vilsack, who had to weigh their careers against their convictions. Justice Mark Cady, who wrote the decision, explains why the court had to rule in favor of the plaintiffs. At the center of the story are the six couples who sacrificed their privacy to demand public respect for their families. Through these voices, Witosky and Hansen show that no one should have been surprised by the 2009 decision. Iowans have a long history of leadership on civil rights. Just a year after Iowa became a state, its citizens adopted as their motto the phrase, oOur liberties we prize and our rights we will maintain.o And they still do today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781609383497 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxv, 180 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (275 pages) : illustrations
A concise legal history of Illinois through the end of the nineteenth century, Prairie Justice covers the region's progression from French to British to early American legal systems, which culminated in a unique body of Illinois law that has influenced other jurisdictions. Written by Roger L. Severns in the 1950s and published in serial form in the 1960s, Prairie Justice is available now for the first time as a book, thanks to the work of editor John A. Lupton, an Illinois and legal historian who also contributed an introduction. Illinois' legal development demonstrates the tension between two completely different European legal systems, between river communities and prairie towns, and between agrarian and urban interests. Severns uses several rulings-including a reconstitution of the Supreme Court in 1824, slavery-related cases, and the impeachment of a Supreme Court justice-to examine political movements in Illinois and their impact on the local judiciary. Through legal decisions, the Illinois judiciary became an independent, co-equal branch of state government. By the mid-nineteenth century, Illinois had established itself as a leading judicial authority, influencing not only the growing western frontier but also the industrialized and farming regions of the country. With a close eye for detail, Severns reviews the status of the legal profession during the 1850s by looking new members of the Court, the nostalgia of circuit riding, and how a young lawyer named Abraham Lincoln rose to prominence. Illinois has a rich judicial history, but that history has not been adequately documented until now. With the publication of Prairie Justice, those interested in Illinois legal history finally have a book that covers the development of the state's judiciary in its formative years.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809333691 20180530
Book
xx, 250 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • "Whose home is in the wilderness"
  • Law and anarchy, Virginia County, federal territory
  • The coming of the common law
  • A frontier court
  • Lawyers and law courts
  • Law and politics
  • Giants in the Prairie
  • Trails of the circuit riders
  • The Coming of Age.
A concise legal history of Illinois through the end of the nineteenth century, Prairie Justice covers the region's progression from French to British to early American legal systems, which culminated in a unique body of Illinois law that has influenced other jurisdictions. Written by Roger L. Severns in the 1950s and published in serial form in the 1960s, Prairie Justice is available now for the first time as a book, thanks to the work of editor John A. Lupton, an Illinois and legal historian who also contributed an introduction. Illinois' legal development demonstrates the tension between two completely different European legal systems, between river communities and prairie towns, and between agrarian and urban interests. Severns uses several rulings-including a reconstitution of the Supreme Court in 1824, slavery-related cases, and the impeachment of a Supreme Court justice-to examine political movements in Illinois and their impact on the local judiciary. Through legal decisions, the Illinois judiciary became an independent, co-equal branch of state government. By the mid-nineteenth century, Illinois had established itself as a leading judicial authority, influencing not only the growing western frontier but also the industrialized and farming regions of the country. With a close eye for detail, Severns reviews the status of the legal profession during the 1850s by looking new members of the Court, the nostalgia of circuit riding, and how a young lawyer named Abraham Lincoln rose to prominence. Illinois has a rich judicial history, but that history has not been adequately documented until now. With the publication of Prairie Justice, those interested in Illinois legal history finally have a book that covers the development of the state's judiciary in its formative years.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809333691 20180530
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (248 pages)
"Providing accurate and objective information to help make the right decisions during a divorce in Illinois, this guide provides answers to 360 queries such as What is the mediation process in Illinois and is it required? How quickly can one get a divorce? Who decides who gets the cars, the pets, and the house? What actions might influence child custody? How are bills divided and paid during the divorce? How much will a divorce cost? and Will a spouse have to pay some or all attorney fees? Structured in a question-and-answer format, this divorce handbook provides clear and concise responses to help build confidence and give the peace of mind needed to meet the challenges of a divorce proceeding"-- Provided by publisher.
Book
v, 36 pages ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
263 pages ; 26 cm
  • An introduction / Joel M. Schumm
  • Keynote address. Justice in jeopardy : the ABA perspective / Wm. T. (Bill) Robinson III
  • Merit selection in Indiana : the foundation for a fair and impartial appellate judiciary / Edward W. Najam, Jr.
  • Merit selection and diversity on the bench / K.O. Myers
  • Judicial retention elections after 2010 / Melissa S. May
  • The perils of merit selection / James Bopp, Jr.
  • A new perspective on judicial disqualification : an antidote to the effects of the decisions in White and Citizens United / Penny J. White
  • Assuring due process through merit selection of judges / Frank Sullivan, Jr.
  • The transformation of the legal profession and legal education / E. Thomas Sullivan
  • Frank Sullivan, Jr., the very model of a modern justice / Randall T. Shepard
  • Tribute to Justice (now Professor) Frank Sullivan, Jr. / Gary R. Roberts.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 258 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • Jury law and tradition in the antebellum Midwest
  • The composition of juries in Sangamon County, Illinois, 1830/60
  • The work of jurors in the antebellum Illinois courtroom
  • The struggle for legal power in Lincoln's America.
In the antebellum Midwest, Americans looked to the law, and specifically to the jury, to navigate the uncertain terrain of a rapidly changing society. During this formative era of American law, the jury served as the most visible connector between law and society. Through an analysis of the composition of grand and trial juries and an examination of their courtroom experiences, Stacy Pratt McDermott demonstrates how central the law was for people who lived in Abraham Lincoln's America. McDermott focuses on the status of the jury as a democratic institution as well as on the status of those who served as jurors. According to the 1860 census, the juries in Springfield and Sangamon County, Illinois, comprised an ethnically and racially diverse population of settlers from northern and southern states, representing both urban and rural mid-nineteenth-century America. It was in these counties that Lincoln developed his law practice, handling more than 5,200 cases in a legal career that spanned nearly twenty-five years. Drawing from a rich collection of legal records, docket books, county histories, and surviving newspapers, McDermott reveals the enormous power jurors wielded over the litigants and the character of their communities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780821419564 20160614
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (xiv, 258 pages, [6] pages of plates) : illustrations, portrait. Digital: data file.
  • Jury law and tradition in the antebellum Midwest
  • The composition of juries in Sangamon County, Illinois, 1830/60
  • The work of jurors in the antebellum Illinois courtroom
  • The struggle for legal power in Lincoln's America.
In the antebellum Midwest, Americans looked to the law, and specifically to the jury, to navigate the uncertain terrain of a rapidly changing society. During this formative era of American law, the jury served as the most visible connector between law and society. Through an analysis of the composition of grand and trial juries and an examination of their courtroom experiences, Stacy Pratt McDermott demonstrates how central the law was for people who lived in Abraham Lincoln's America. McDermott focuses on the status of the jury as a democratic institution as well as on the status of those.
Book
xiv, 258 p., [6] p. of plates : ill., port.
  • Jury law and tradition in the antebellum Midwest
  • The composition of juries in Sangamon County, Illinois, 1830/60
  • The work of jurors in the antebellum Illinois courtroom
  • The struggle for legal power in Lincoln's America.
Book
xxii, 1273 p. ; 26 cm.
  • General provisions
  • Judical notice
  • Burdens of proof and presumptions in civil and criminal actions and proceedings
  • Relevancy and its limits
  • Privilege
  • Witness
  • Opinions and expert testimony
  • Hearsay
  • Authentication and identification
  • Original writing rule
  • Miscellaneous rules
  • Illinois rules of evidence
  • Committee commentary to the Illinois rules of evidence.
Law Library (Crown)

20. Iowa legal research [2011]

Book
xxvii, 305 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • The research process and legal analysis
  • Legal research sources and techniques
  • Secondary sources
  • The constitution
  • Judicial opinions, reporters, and digests
  • Statutes, court rules, and ordinances
  • Legislative history
  • Administrative law
  • Updating with citators
  • Practice aids
  • Legal ethics
  • Research strategies
  • Appendix: Legal citations.
Law Library (Crown)