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Book
xii, 207 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction / James M. Denham
  • Spanish courts / M.C. Mirow
  • British courts / Robert M. Jarvis
  • Territorial courts / Christopher A. Vallandingham
  • Confederate courts / Robert W. Lee
  • Military courts / David J.R. Frakt
  • Religious courts / Donna Litman
  • Black courts / Ernesto A. Longa
  • Indian courts / Tonya Kowalski and Robert M. Jarvis.
Pushing past the standard federal-state narrative, the essays in Florida's Other Courts examine eight little-known Florida courts. In doing so, they fill a longstanding gap in the state's legal literature. In Part I, the contributors profile Florida's courts under the Spanish and British empires and during its existence as a U.S. territory and a member of the Confederate States of America. In Part II, they describe four modern-era courts: those governing military personnel stationed in Florida; adherents of specific religious faiths in Florida; residents of Miami's black neighborhoods during the waning days of Jim Crow segregation; and members of the Miccosukee and Seminole Indian tribes. Including extensive notes, a detailed index, and a complete table of cases, this volume offers a new and compelling look at the development of justice in Florida.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813056685 20180416
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvii, 409 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Article I : declaration of rights
  • Article II : general provisions
  • Article III : legislature
  • Article IV : executive
  • Article V : judiciary
  • Article VI : suffrage and elections
  • Article VII : finance and taxation
  • Article VIII : local government
  • Article IX : education
  • Article X : miscellaneous
  • Article XI : amendments
  • Article XII : schedule.
With an introduction that traces the long constitutional history of Florida, Talbot D'Alemberte provides a thorough understanding of Florida's state constitutional history. He includes an in-depth, article-by-article analysis of the entire constitution, detailing the many significant changes that have been made since its initial drafting. This treatment, along with a table of cases, index, and bibliography, provides an unsurpassed reference guide for students, scholars, and practitioners of Florida's constitution. This second edition provides analysis of Florida's State Constitution with updated commentary focusing on the many court decisions rendered since the 1990s, summarizing the state's current jurisprudence and the increasing use of Florida's many methods of Constitution Amendment, including initiative, Legislative, Constitution Revision Commission and Tax and Budget Reform Commission adopted proposals. The Oxford Commentaries on the State Constitutions of the United States is an important series that reflects a renewed international interest in constitutional history and provides expert insight into each of the 50 state constitutions. Each volume in this innovative series contains a historical overview of the state's constitutional development, a section-by-section analysis of its current constitution, and a comprehensive guide to further research. Under the expert editorship of Professor G. Alan Tarr, Director of the Center on State Constitutional Studies at Rutgers University, this series provides essential reference tools for understanding state constitutional law. Books in the series can be purchased individually or as part of a complete set, giving readers unmatched access to these important political documents.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190464066 20170306
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xix, 506 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Chronology of cases and important events
  • Four horsemen of the reformation
  • 1974 : Overton and England
  • 1975 : Sundberg and Hatchett
  • Article V : architects of change
  • The third branch
  • The spirit of 1976 : reformers take control
  • Unexpected replacements : Alderman and McDonald
  • Playing chicken with courtroom cameras
  • Access to legal services : who will serve the poor?
  • "Save the Supreme Court"
  • Personal injury : a collision of interests
  • Media law : satyrs, beer trucks, and teachers
  • Personal injury : a wrong finds a remedy
  • Divorce and family litigation : till the judge do us part
  • Environment and growth : property rights and the public good
  • Death penalty : the long last mile
  • The machinery of death
  • The "e" seat : Ervin to England to Ehrlich
  • Accepting gays
  • Reapportionment : where to draw the lines
  • Search and seizure : reshaping constitutional protections
  • Private lives and public values in criminal law
  • Shaw : from descendant of a slave to Chief Justice
  • Death penalty : deciding who dies
  • Sovereign immunity : suing city hall
  • Constitutional amendments : tinkering with democracy
  • Open government and privacy : the Forsberg saga
  • Chief Justice Boyd : the passover ends
  • Criminal law : to establish justice
  • "Rosemary the first"
  • Virgil Hawkins : crossing the bar.
This third volume in the history of the Florida Supreme Court describes the court during its most tumultuous years. Amid the upheaval of the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and Watergate, the story begins with reform in the entire Florida court system. It includes the court's first black justice, Joseph Hatchett; Governor Reubin Askew's new system for merit selection of justices; and revision of Article V, the section of the state constitution dealing with the judiciary. Neil Skene moves on to cover landmark court decisions; the introduction of cameras in court; changes to media law, personal injury law, and family and divorce law; privacy rights; gay rights; death penalty cases; and the appointment of the first woman justice, Rosemary Barkett. This book is an absorbing portrayal of a judicial institution adapting to a time of deep political and social change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813054483 20170925
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (1 volume (various pagings)).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (273 pages), illustrations, tables.
Mid-twentieth-century Florida was a state in flux. Changes exemplified by rapidly burgeoning cities and suburbs, the growth of the Kennedy Space Center during the space race, and the impending construction of Walt Disney World overwhelmed the outdated 1885 constitution. A small group of rural legislators known as the "Pork Chop Gang" controlled the state and thwarted several attempts to modernize the constitution. Through court-imposed redistribution of legislators and the hard work of state leaders, however, the executive branch was reorganized and the constitution was modernized.In Making Modern Florida, Mary Adkins goes behind the scenes to examine the history and impact of the 1966-68 revision of the Florida state constitution. With storytelling flair, Adkins uses interviews and detailed analysis of speeches and transcripts to vividly capture the moves, gambits, and backroom moments necessary to create and introduce a new state constitution. This carefully researched account brings to light the constitutional debates and political processes in the growth to maturity of what is now the nation's third largest state.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813062853 20171030
Book
xxv, 241 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm.
  • The old constitutions
  • The U.S. Supreme Court reapportionment cases
  • The 1966 Constitution Revision Commission
  • Building a constitution's foundation
  • Putting it together, part I
  • Drafting a constitution, drafting a legislature
  • The CRC debates : November and December 1966
  • Putting it together, part II
  • A new constitution.
Mid-twentieth-century Florida was a state in flux. Changes exemplified by rapidly burgeoning cities and suburbs, the growth of the Kennedy Space Center during the space race, and the impending construction of Walt Disney World overwhelmed the outdated 1885 constitution. A small group of rural legislators known as the "Pork Chop Gang" controlled the state and thwarted several attempts to modernize the constitution. Through court-imposed redistribution of legislators and the hard work of state leaders, however, the executive branch was reorganized and the constitution was modernized.In Making Modern Florida, Mary Adkins goes behind the scenes to examine the history and impact of the 1966-68 revision of the Florida state constitution. With storytelling flair, Adkins uses interviews and detailed analysis of speeches and transcripts to vividly capture the moves, gambits, and backroom moments necessary to create and introduce a new state constitution. This carefully researched account brings to light the constitutional debates and political processes in the growth to maturity of what is now the nation's third largest state.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813062853 20171030
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (273 pages), illustrations, tables.
Mid-twentieth-century Florida was a state in flux. Changes exemplified by rapidly burgeoning cities and suburbs, the growth of the Kennedy Space Center during the space race, and the impending construction of Walt Disney World overwhelmed the outdated 1885 constitution. A small group of rural legislators known as the "Pork Chop Gang" controlled the state and thwarted several attempts to modernize the constitution. Through court-imposed redistribution of legislators and the hard work of state leaders, however, the executive branch was reorganized and the constitution was modernized.In Making Modern Florida, Mary Adkins goes behind the scenes to examine the history and impact of the 1966-68 revision of the Florida state constitution. With storytelling flair, Adkins uses interviews and detailed analysis of speeches and transcripts to vividly capture the moves, gambits, and backroom moments necessary to create and introduce a new state constitution. This carefully researched account brings to light the constitutional debates and political processes in the growth to maturity of what is now the nation's third largest state.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813062853 20180611
Book
xix, 345 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: Redistricting in Florida / Seth C. McKee
  • Part I: Process
  • Before the lines are drawn : congressional apportionment in Florida / Jeffrey W. ladewig
  • New rules for an old Florida game : the 2012 legislative and congressional redistricting process / Aubrey Jewett
  • The law and politics of Florida redistricting in state and federal court / Mark Jonathan McKenzie
  • Part II: Politics
  • Drawing the line : public support for amendments 5 and 6 / Joseph T. Eagleton and Daniel A. Smith
  • Redistricting in Florida : loud voices from the grassroots / Susan A. MacManus, Joanna M. Cheshire, Tifini L. Hill, and Susan C. Schuler
  • Paradoxes of political reform : congressional redistricting in Florida / Micah Altman and Michael P. McDonald
  • Part III: Effects
  • Running with uncertainty : candidate emergence during redistricting in Florida / Cherie D. Maestas and Travis A. Braidwood
  • The participatory consequences of Florida redistricting / Danny Hayes, M. V. Hood III, and Seth C. McKee
  • Elections in a brave new world : reform, redistricting, and the battle for the 2012 legislature / Jonathan Winburn
  • Effects of redistricting in congressional elections / Charles S. Bullock III
  • Conclusion : the never-ending story / Seth C. McKee.
This brief review of the evolution of redistricting standards, processes, and outcomes underscores the importance of scholarship examining the dynamics of each redistricting cycle. Jigsaw Puzzle Politics in the Sunshine State , edited by the highly respected political scientist, Seth C. McKee, chronicles the redistricting controversies that emerged during the 2012 cycle. Jigsaw Puzzle Politics gives readers a comprehensive look at the ohows, whens, whys, and consequenceso of the most recent redistricting wars.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813060712 20160704
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xx, 180 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Planning and organizing research
  • Judicial decisions
  • Statutes and constitutions
  • Administrative law
  • Updating
  • Secondary sources
  • Research aids
  • Rules of court and ethics
  • citation.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (235 pages) : illustrations
The Johns Committee, a product of the red scare in Florida, grabbed headlines and destroyed lives. Its goal was to halt integration by destroying the NAACP in Florida and smearing integrationists. Citizens were first subpoenaed under charges of communist tendencies and later for homosexual or subversive behaviour. Drawing on previously unpublished sources and newly unsealed records, Judith Poucher profiles five individuals who stood up to the Johns Committee. Virgil Hawkins and Ruth Perry were civil rights activists who, respectively, foiled the committee's plans to stop integration at the University of Florida and refused to divulge Florida and Miami NAACP records. G.G.Mock, a bartender in Tampa, was arrested and shackled in the nude by police but would not reveal the name of her girlfriend, a teacher. University of Florida professor Sig Diettrich was threatened with twenty years in prison and being "outed, " yet he still would not name names. Margaret Fisher, a college administrator, helped to bring the committee's investigation of the University of South Florida into the open, publicly condemning their bullying. By re-examining the daring stands taken by these ordinary citizens, Poucher illustrates not only the abuses propagated by the committee but also the collective power of individuals to effect change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813049939 20180530
Book
xvi, 217 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Charley Johns and Virgil Hawkins: ambition realized, dream deferred
  • Virgil Hawkins: pursuit of the dream continues
  • Ruth Perry: the librarian raises her voice
  • Sig Diettrich: the geographer draws the line
  • G. G. Mock: surrounded by fear, empowered by love
  • Margaret Fisher and her University of South Florida colleagues: intellectuals versus inquisitors
  • Conclusion: Majorities of one.
The Johns Committee, a product of the red scare in Florida, grabbed headlines and destroyed lives. Its goal was to halt integration by destroying the NAACP in Florida and smearing integrationists. Citizens were first subpoenaed under charges of communist tendencies and later for homosexual or subversive behaviour. Drawing on previously unpublished sources and newly unsealed records, Judith Poucher profiles five individuals who stood up to the Johns Committee. Virgil Hawkins and Ruth Perry were civil rights activists who, respectively, foiled the committee's plans to stop integration at the University of Florida and refused to divulge Florida and Miami NAACP records. G.G.Mock, a bartender in Tampa, was arrested and shackled in the nude by police but would not reveal the name of her girlfriend, a teacher. University of Florida professor Sig Diettrich was threatened with twenty years in prison and being "outed, " yet he still would not name names. Margaret Fisher, a college administrator, helped to bring the committee's investigation of the University of South Florida into the open, publicly condemning their bullying. By re-examining the daring stands taken by these ordinary citizens, Poucher illustrates not only the abuses propagated by the committee but also the collective power of individuals to effect change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813049939 20180530
Green Library
Book
1 v. (various pagings) ; 28 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
20 pages : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 204 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Seventeen equal pieces
  • Justice Dekle's "dissent"
  • School for scandal
  • David McCain, eagle scout
  • What's a politician to do?
  • Shadows of treason
  • Circling the wagons
  • A "good old boy" court
  • A Florida Watergate?
  • Like calling Walter Cronkite
  • Public trial, secret trial
  • A politician first-- a justice second
  • Dekle resigns
  • Appearance of impropriety
  • The old order is over
  • The fugitive
  • The keys to the courthouse
  • Clear and present dangers.
In the 1970s, justices on the Florida Supreme Court were popularly elected. But a number of scandals threatened to topple the court until public outrage led to profound reforms and fundamental changes in the way justices were seated.One justice abruptly retired after being filmed on a high-roller junket to Las Vegas. Two others tried to fix cases in lower courts on behalf of campaign supporters. A fourth destroyed evidence by shredding his copy of a document into "seventeen equal" strips of paper that he then flushed down a toilet.As the journalist who wrote most of the stories that exposed these events, Martin Dyckman played a key role in revealing the corruption, favoritism, and cronyism then rampant in the court."A Most Disorderly Court" recounts this dark period in Florida politics, when stunning revelations regularly came to light. He also traces the reform efforts that ultimately led to a constitutional amendment providing for the appointment of all Florida's appellate judges, and emphasizes the absolute importance of confidential sources for journalists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813032054 20160528
Green Library
Book
xx, 219 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • Judicial decisions
  • Statutes and constitutions
  • Administrative law
  • Updating
  • Planning and organizing research
  • Secondary sources
  • Rules of court and ethics
  • Form books
  • Looseleaf services
  • Citation.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (xlii, 407, A-F pages).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxi, 757 p. ; 26 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 428 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Brown and Manley, two award-winning legal and Florida history scholars, offer an in-depth analysis of the court, the individuals who sat on its bench, the major subject areas of appeals it considered, and the influences that propelled its evolution during an era that was crucial to Florida's emergence as a national force. This court presided through two world wars, the issues of desegregation and growth management, court scandals, and the emergence of drug trafficking in South Florida. In a series of distinct but connected vignettes that draw effectively on oral interviews, the volume provides the first examination of the events that shaped the Florida Supreme Court. One of the few such studies of any state supreme court in the United States, it provides insights into judicial, political, and governmental processes applicable beyond the state. Further, it places hundreds of crucial court decisions within the context of state and national history. The authors delve deeply into controversies within the supreme court, including the associations, interests, and actions of individual tribunal members. Justices forgotten by history or subjected to professional slight emerge as dynamic and positive factors while the reputations of others, previously heralded for their service, face a level of critical scrutiny they had eluded. All of the men who served on the tribunal during the period appear unencumbered by the mystique of their office. As such, the authors offer a solid foundation for understanding scandals that rocked the court in the mid-1970s. From these circumstances emerged the court whose decision to recount the 2000 presidential election votes was reversed by the U.S. Supreme Court.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813030036 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 266 p., [12] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • A case of conflict : growth, science, tradition
  • The Kissimmee River story : empire and ecology
  • Custom, criteria, and community : clarifying the OHWL concept
  • Drawing the line : the changing status of the natural world
  • Lawyers, landowners, surveyors, and the state : the OHWL language wars
  • A new low for the ordinary high water line : the demand for certainty
  • Down to the waterline : the nature of our place.
In most states the boundary separating public waters from private uplands - the ordinary high water line (OHWL) - is a flashpoint between proponents of either property rights or public-trust protection of our water. Using Florida as a case study, Down to the Waterline is the first book-length analysis of the OHWL doctrine and its legal, technical, and cultural underpinnings. Sara Warner not only covers the historical function of the OHWL but tells how advances in science and our environmental attitudes have led us to a more complex encounter with this ancient boundary. Florida sees a steady influx of new residents who crowd along its extensive coasts and interior shorelines - yet who also demand pristine water resources. The OHWL establishes public access and private ownership limits on some of the state's most valuable land: in economic terms, waterfront real estate; in ecological terms, marshes and wetlands. Sara Warner brings to life many of the courtroom battles fought over the OHWL through the perspectives of ranchers, outdoors enthusiasts, developers, surveyors, scientists, and policymakers. While explaining the OHWL's legal and political intricacies, Warner never loses sight of the wonder of herons wading a marsh or a large-mouth bass breaking a smooth lake surface. To her the OHWL is not just an ideological battleground; it is a marker of how we see the natural world. What do we think we're doing when we channel a river or fill a swamp? she asks - for it matters greatly where we focus our attention before invoking the awesome capabilities of technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780820327037 20160528
Green Library
Book
xii, 205 p.
  • Limited liability company, in general
  • Limited liability company : advantages and disadvantages
  • Type of LLCs
  • Start-up procedures
  • Capital structure and selling interests
  • Running a limited liability company
  • Amending a limited liability company
  • Dissolving a limited liability company.