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Book
x, 514 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1: Introduction: Constituting Law, Constituting Justice in the Jewish School Question Chapter 2: Invoking Equality, Invoking Legality: Jews Constituting Their Canadian Identity Chapter 3: Schools, Taxes, Jews, Catholics (and Protestants): The Origins of the Jewish School Question Chapter 4: Jews and Roman Catholics, School Taxes and Protestants: The First Jewish School Question Chapter 5: Taxes, the Rabbi and the Schoolboy: S 93 and the Pinsler Case Chapter 6: Promises, Promises: "Honorary Protestants" in Protestant Schools Chapter 7: Jews, Protestants, and Taxes (Again): The Jewish School Question in the 1920s Chapter 8: Jews, Protestants, Roman Catholics, and the Law: The Jewish School Question Goes to Court Chapter 9: Jews, Protestants, and Roman Catholics: Two Crises, and the Jewish School Question, 1928-31 Chapter 10: The Protestant Jews of Ste. Sophie and La Macaza: Constituting School and Community in Rural Quebec Chapter 11: Outremont and Beyond: The Jewish School Question Moves West Chapter 12: Hampstead and Beyond: From the Ghetto to Citizenship and Equality under Law's Shadow Chapter 13: TMR, St. Laurent, Cote Saint-Luc: Democracy, Law, and the End of the Jewish School Question Chapter 14: Constituting Canada and the Jewish School Question in Montreal.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442630482 20160619
When the Constitution Act of 1867 was enacted, section 93 guaranteed certain educational rights to Catholics and Protestants in Quebec, but not to any others. Over the course of the next century, the Jewish community in Montreal carved out an often tenuous arrangement for public schooling as "honorary Protestants, " based on complex negotiations with the Protestant and Catholic school boards, the provincial government, and individual municipalities. In the face of the constitution's exclusionary language, all parties gave their compromise a legal form which was frankly unconstitutional, but unavoidable if Jewish children were to have access to public schools. Bargaining in the shadow of the law, they made their own constitution long before the formal constitutional amendment of 1997 finally put an end to the issue. In Honorary Protestants, David Fraser presents the first legal history of the Jewish school question in Montreal. Based on extensive archival research, it highlights the complex evolution of concepts of rights, citizenship, and identity, negotiated outside the strict legal boundaries of the constitution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442630482 20160619
Green Library
Book
177 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 210 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvi, 467 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of Tables and Figures Foreword Acknowledgments Abbreviations Introduction * English Justice in a Foreign Land * Making Justices * The Character of the Magistracy * The Police before the Police * The Relevance of Criminal Justice * Experiencing the Everyday Course of Criminal Justice * Criminal Justice and Social Power * Criminal Justice and State Power Conclusion Notes Bibliography Illustration Credits Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780802092236 20160603
The role and function of criminal justice in a conquered colony is always problematic, and the case of Quebec is no exception. Many historians have suggested that, between the Conquest and the Rebellions (1760s-1830s), Quebec's 'Canadien' inhabitants both boycotted and were excluded from the British criminal justice system. Magistrates, Police, and People challenges this simplistic view of the relationship between criminal law and Quebec society, offering instead a fresh view of a complex accord. Based on extensive research in judicial and official sources, Donald Fyson offers the first comprehensive study of the everyday workings of criminal justice in Quebec and Lower Canada. Focussing on the justices of the peace and their police, Fyson examines both the criminal justice system itself, and the system in operation as experienced by those who participated in it. Fyson contends that, although the system was fundamentally biased, its flexibility provided a source of power for ordinary citizens. At the same time, everyday criminal justice offered the colonial state and colonial elites a powerful, though often faulty, means of imposing their will on Quebec society. This fascinating and controversial study will challenge many received historical interpretations, providing new insight into the criminal justice system of early Quebec.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780802092236 20160603
Law Library (Crown)
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Book
235 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxi, 369 p. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 314 p. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xix, 336 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
193 p. : portr. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxxviii, 152, 146, xlii p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxix, 200 p. ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xlv, 1120 p. ; 17 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
165 p. ; 21 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (189 pages)
  • Circuit court/circus court
  • Toponymy and its objects
  • The children under the bed
  • Lovers and healing circles
  • Circuit/circus/circle
  • Agents of justice/agents of love.
"Exploring the quandaries of intercultural communication and contemplating how diverse legal sensibilities might be mutually recognized, Incorporating the Familiar evokes the possibilities and limits of intercultural accommodation. Susan Drummond explores a series of philosophic, ethnographic and legal dilemmas produced by the interaction between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal legal cultures, setting up a dialogue between narrative and theory by interspersing accounts of her field experiences in Inuit communities with analytical chapters." "In the first section she addresses problems of delivery of justice among Inuit communities and explores the cultural determinacy of understanding. In the second section she focuses on the problem of family violence and the complexities to which it gives rise in rendering justice in Inuit communities. In the third section she provides an ethnographic account of Nunavik's first sentencing circle, underlining her contention that juridical rule emerge from the habits and forms of a society."--Jacket.
Book
189 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxvi, 330 p. ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxvii, 722 p. ; 19 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ii, 115 p. ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)