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Book
xxi, 325 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : portraits ; 24 cm.
  • Give us the Court of Appeal, 1792-1874
  • Oliver Mowat's court, 1874-1912
  • The Meredith-Mulock-Rowell courts, 1913-38 : experiments in court reform
  • The Robertson-Pickup-Porter courts, 1938-67
  • Renewal : the Gale-Estey-Howland Courts, 1967-90
  • Dublin-McMurtry Courts, 1990-2007
  • Into the twenty-first century : the Winkler court, 2007-13.
In Christopher Moore's lively and engaging history of the Court of Appeal for Ontario, he traces the evolution of one of Canada's most influential courts from its origins as a branch of the lieutenant governor's executive council to the post-Charter years of cutting-edge jurisprudence and national influence. Discussing the issues, personalities, and politics which have shaped Ontario's highest court, The Court of Appeal for Ontario offers appreciations of key figures in Canada's legal and political history - including John Beverly Robinson, Oliver Mowat, Bora Laskin, and Bertha Wilson - and a serious examination of what the right of appeal means and how it has been interpreted by Canadians over the last two hundred years. The first comprehensive history of the Ontario Court of Appeal, Moore's book is the definitive and eminently readable account of the court that has been called everything from a bulwark against tyranny to murderer's row.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442650145 20160617
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xviii, 211 pages ; 23 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (xvii, 556 pages)
  • Foreword The Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, P.C., Chief Justice of Canada List of Contributors Part 1: Introduction Michael Trebilcock (University of Toronto), Anthony Duggan (University of Toronto), and Lorne Sossin (Dean of Osgoode Hall Law School) Part 2: Defining the Problem - What are the Unmet Legal Needs? Chapter 1: Caught in the Middle: Income, Justiciable Problems and the Use of Lawyers Pascoe Pleasance (University College London) and Nigel J. Balmer (University College London) Chapter 2: The Ontario Civil Needs Project: A Comparative Analysis of the 2009 Survey Data Jamie Baxter, Michael Trebilcock, and Albert Yoon (University of Toronto) Part 3: "Front-End" Proactive Solutions Chapter 3:Front-End Strategies for Improving Consumer Access to Justice Anthony Duggan (University of Toronto) and Iain Ramsey (University of Kent) Part 4: Non-Lawyer Forms of Assistance Chapter 4: Opportunities and Challenges: Non-Lawyer Forms of Assistance in Providing Access to Justice for Middle-Income Earners Russell Engler (New England Law) Chapter 5: Middle Income Access to Civil Justice: Implications of Proposals for the Reform of Legal Aid in England and Wales Roger Smith Part 5: Access to Lawyers Chapter 6: Should Legal Services be Unbundled? Samreen Beg and Lorne Sossin Chapter 7: Money Isn't Everything: Understanding Moderate Income Households' Use of Lawyers' Services Rebecca Sandefur (American Bar Foundation) Chapter 8: Legal Services Plans: Crucial Time Access to Lawyers and the Case for a Public-Private Partnership Paul Vayda (CAW Legal Services Plan) and Stephen Ginsberg (CAW Legal Services Plan) Part 6: Reforming the Dispute Resolution Process Chapter 9: Reforming Family Dispute Resolution in Ontario: Systemic Changes and Cultural Shifts Nicholas Bala (Queen's University) Chapter 10: Commentary on Bala Justice George Czurtin (Justice of the Superior Court of Justice - Ontario) Chapter 11: Access to Justice for Small Amount Claims in the Consumer Marketplace: Lessons from Australia Justin Malbon (Monash University) Chapter 12: Challenges in Small Claims Court System Design: Does One Size Fit All? Shelley McGill (Deputy Judge of the Ontario Small Claims Court) Part 7: Creating Change and Reform of the Justice System Chapter 13: Growing Ontario Legal Aid into the Middle Class: A Proposal for Public Legal Expenses Insurance Sujit Choudry (University of Toronto), Michael Trebilcock, and James Wilson Part 8: The Options Papers Noel Semple (York University) and Carol Rogerson (University of Toronto), Middle Income Access to Justice: Policy Options with respect to Family Law Judith McCormack (University of Toronto) and Azim Remani (University of Toronto), Middle Income Access to Justice: Policy Options with Respect to Employment Law Anthony Duggan, Azim Remani and Dennis Kao (Sidley Austin LLP), Middle Income Access to Justice: Policy Options with respect to Consumer and Debtor-Creditor Law Part 9: Select Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442644441 20180521
Though most conceptions of the rule of law assume equality before the law - and hence equal access to the justice system - this basic right is not being met for many low and middle income Canadians. This book focuses on the problem of civil access to justice for middle income earners - those whose household income is high enough to disqualify them from legal aid but not high enough to cover the costs of litigation. Featuring contributions by leading Canadian and international scholars, practitioners, and members of the judiciary, this multidisciplinary collection draws on scholarship in the fields of law, social science, and public policy. There is a particular emphasis on family law, consumer law, and employment law, as these are the areas where research has indicated that unmet legal needs are highest. Middle Income Access to Justice presents a variety of innovative solutions, from dispute resolution process reforms to the development of non-lawyer forms of assistance and new methods for funding legal expenses. In doing so, it lays the foundation for the development of a much-needed new delivery model to provide early intervention for legal services.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442644441 20180521
Book
xvii, 556 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Caught in the middle : justiciable problems and the use of lawyers / Pascoe Pleasance and Nigel J. Balmer
  • The Ontario Civil Needs Project : a comparative analysis of the 2009 survey data / Jamie Baxter, Michael Trebilcock, and Albert Yoon
  • Front-end strategies for improving consumer access to justice / Anthony Duggan and Iain Ramsey
  • Opportunities and challenges : non-lawyer forms of assistance in providing access to justice for middle-income earners / Russell Engler
  • Middle income access to civil justice : implications of proposals for the reform of legal aid in England and Wales / Roger Smith
  • Should legal services be unbundled? / Samreen Beg and Lorne Sossin
  • Money isn't everything : understanding moderate income households' use of lawyers' services / Rebecca L. Sandefur
  • Legal services plans : crucial time access to lawyers and the case for a public-private partnership / Paul A. Vayda and Stephen B. Ginsberg
  • Reforming family dispute resolution in Ontario : systemic changes and cultural shifts / Nicholas Bala
  • Some reflections on family dispute resolution in Ontario / George Czurtin
  • Access to justice for small amount claims in the consumer marketplace : lessons from Australia / Justin Malbon
  • Challenges in small claims court system design : does one size fit all? / Shelley McGill
  • Growing Legal Aid Ontario into the middle class : a proposal for public legal expenses insurance / Sujit Choudry, Michael Trebilcock, and James Wilson
  • Middle-income access to justice : policy options with respect to family law / Noel Semple and Carol Rogerson
  • Middle income access to justice : policy options with respect to employment law / Judith McCormack and Azim Remani
  • Middle income access to justice : policy options with respect to consumer and debtor/creditor law / Anthony Duggan, Azim Remani, and Dennis Kao.
Though most conceptions of the rule of law assume equality before the law - and hence equal access to the justice system - this basic right is not being met for many low and middle income Canadians. This book focuses on the problem of civil access to justice for middle income earners - those whose household income is high enough to disqualify them from legal aid but not high enough to cover the costs of litigation. Featuring contributions by leading Canadian and international scholars, practitioners, and members of the judiciary, this multidisciplinary collection draws on scholarship in the fields of law, social science, and public policy. There is a particular emphasis on family law, consumer law, and employment law, as these are the areas where research has indicated that unmet legal needs are highest. Middle Income Access to Justice presents a variety of innovative solutions, from dispute resolution process reforms to the development of non-lawyer forms of assistance and new methods for funding legal expenses. In doing so, it lays the foundation for the development of a much-needed new delivery model to provide early intervention for legal services.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442644441 20160609
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 256 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements Introduction * Blackness and the Law in Slavery and Freedom * Nationhood, Mercy and the Gallows * Black Patriarchy * Tales of a "Peculiarly Horrible Description": Archetypal Rape Narratives * Race, Sex, and the Power of Dominant Rape Narratives Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780802099099 20160602
While slavery in Canada was abolished in 1834, discrimination remained. Race on Trial contrasts formal legal equality with pervasive patterns of social, legal, and attitudinal inequality in Ontario by documenting the history of black Ontarians who appeared before the criminal courts from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries. Using capital case files and the assize records for Kent and Essex counties, areas that had significant black populations because they were termini for the Underground Railroad, Barrington Walker investigates the limits of freedom for Ontario's African Canadians. Through court transcripts, depositions, jail records, Judge's Bench Books, newspapers, and government correspondence, Walker identifies trends in charges and convictions in the Black population. This exploration of the complex and often contradictory web of racial attitudes and the values of white legal elites not only exposes how blackness was articulated in Canadian law but also offers a rare glimpse of black life as experienced in Canada's past.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780802099099 20160602
Law Library (Crown)
Book
227 p. ; 24 cm.
  • The Toronto Women's Police Court as an institution
  • Feminism, moral equality, and the criminal law : the women's court as feminized justice
  • "The badness of their badness when they're bad" : women, crime, and the Court
  • "What chance is there for a girl?" : vagrancy and theft charges in the women's court
  • "Up again, Jenny?" : repeat offenders in the women's court
  • "Can her justice be just?" : Margaret Patterson, male critics, and female criminals.
In 1913, Toronto launched Canada's first woman's police court. The court was run by and for women, but was it a great achievement? This multifaceted portrait of the cases, defendants, and officials that graced its halls reveals a fundamental contradiction at the experiment's core: the Toronto Women's Police Court was both a site for feminist adaptations of justice and a court empowered to punish women.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780774817110 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
ix, 221 leaves ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 191 p. ; 24 cm.
"Defining Rights and Wrongs" investigates the day-to-day practices of the officials who manage human rights complaints. Rosanna Langer documents agencies' struggle to reconcile a huge body of claims within expansive standards and restrictive rules. She also examines how independent human rights advocates and organizations challenge the agency to respond to calls for change. Langer concludes that tensions remain between rights, enforcement ideals, and operational imperatives; between the public interest and particular individual complainants; and between perpetuation and change. In its defence of the public interest and offering a strong anti-discrimination framework at a time when public complaint administration is under attack, "Defining Rights and Wrongs" opposes the formalization and privatization of discrimination complaints. It will interest practitioners, students, and academics interested in human rights, politics, public policy, and law and society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780774813525 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (xi, 258 pages) : illustrations
  • 1. 'Such a program of legislation': illegitimacy and law reform
  • 2. 'Doubtful of her veracity': procedures and judgment under the Children of Unmarried Parents Act
  • 3. 'I did not bring this child into the world by myself': stories of unwed pregnancy
  • 4. 'Best for our babies': the adoption mandate
  • 5. 'Haunted by bills': lone motherhood and poverty
  • 6. 'Known as Mrs S': cohabitation and the Children of Unmarried Parents Act.
In 1921, despite the passing of legislation intended to ease the consequences of illegitimacy for children (Children of Unmarried Parents Act), reformers in Ontario made no effort to improve the status of unwed mothers. Furthermore, the reforms that were passed served as models for legislation in other provinces and even in some American states, institutionalizing, in essence, the prejudices evident throughout. Until now, historians have not sufficiently studied these measures, resulting in the marginalization of unwed mothers as historical subjects. In Misconceptions, Lori Chambers seeks to redress this oversight. By way of analysis and careful critique, Chambers shows that the solutions to unwed pregnancy promoted in the reforms of 1921 were themselves based upon misconceptions. The book also explores the experiences of unwed mothers who were subjected to the legislation of the time, thus shedding an invaluable light on these formerly ignored subjects. Ultimately, Misconceptions argues that child welfare measures which simultaneously seek to rescue children and punish errant women will not, and cannot, succeed in alleviating child or maternal poverty.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780802044631 20181008
Book
1 online resource (274 pages) : illustrations.
In 1921, despite the passing of legislation intended to ease the consequences of illegitimacy for children (Children of Unmarried Parents Act), reformers in Ontario made no effort to improve the status of unwed mothers. Furthermore, the reforms that were passed served as models for legislation in other provinces and even in some American states, institutionalizing, in essence, the prejudices evident throughout. Until now, historians have not sufficiently studied these measures, resulting in the marginalization of unwed mothers as historical subjects. In Misconceptions, Lori Chambers seeks to redress this oversight. By way of analysis and careful critique, Chambers shows that the solutions to unwed pregnancy promoted in the reforms of 1921 were themselves based upon misconceptions. The book also explores the experiences of unwed mothers who were subjected to the legislation of the time, thus shedding an invaluable light on these formerly ignored subjects. Ultimately, Misconceptions argues that child welfare measures which simultaneously seek to rescue children and punish errant women will not, and cannot, succeed in alleviating child or maternal poverty.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780802044631 20181008
Book
xxi, 307 p. : forms ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 285 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 285 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (298 pages) : illustrations, map.
In 1791 when the Constitutional Act created a legislative assembly for Upper Canada, the colonists and their British rulers decreed that the operating criminal justice system in the area be adopted from England, to avoid any undue influence from the nearby United States. In this new study of early Canadian law, David Murray has delved into the court records of the Niagara District, one of the richest sets of criminal court records surviving from Upper Canada, to analyze the criminal justice system in the district during the first half of the nineteenth century. Murray explores how far local characteristics affected the operation of a criminal justice system transplanted from England; his analysis includes how legal processes affected Upper Canadian morality, the treatment of the insane, welfare cases, crimes committed in the district, and an examination of the roles of the Niagara magistrates, constables, and juries. Murray concludes by arguing that while the principles and culture of British justice were firmly implanted in the Niagara district, this did not prevent justice from being unequal, especially for women and visible minorities. Integrating the stories of the individuals caught up in the legal system, Murray explores law from a local perspective, and illuminates how the Niagara region's criminal justice system operated under hybrid influences from both Britain and the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780802086884 20181008
Book
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 29 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 30 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (451 pages)
Long before the spectacular collapse of Bre-X in 1997, the Canadian capital markets had their share of swindlers and crooks. In the boom times after Second World War, hard-sell speculative mining ventures, pushing what often amounted to a few acres of moose pasture, riddled over-the-counter markets and the TSE. It was in this context that the Ontario Securities Commission developed into Canada's leading securities regulator. Following the war, the OSC concerned itself primarily with fraudsters and attempts to reign in Toronto's boiler rooms, but by the mid-sixties increasingly sophisticated markets and a series of scandals culminating in the Windfall affair resulted in a rewriting of the Securities Act and a widening of the OSC's investor protection mandate. The seventies tested the Commission's new powers as increased corporate merger activity brought the phrase "insider-trading" into the popular lexicon. Surprisingly, considering that capital markets have such a profound impact on Canada's well-being, this is the first thorough study of the their post-war evolution and regulation. Moose Pastures and Mergers takes off where the author's acclaimed previous work, Blue Skies and Boiler Rooms: Buying and Selling Securities in Canada, 1870 - 1940, left off. With an ear for a good story - seedy personalities, bunglers and guileless victims abound - and a scholar's rigour, Armstrong has met the protean beast of share markets head on and revealed its shape for the timid or the merely baffled. Essential reading for business journalists, securities lawyers, academics, and interested investors. Winner of the J.J. Talman Award presented by the Ontario Historical Society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442657601 20181008
Book
xiii, 147 p. : forms ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xvii, 207 p. ; forms ; 23 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 258 p. ; 24 cm.
Champion sprinter Donovan Bailey said it, and this book confirms it. While racism may not be as blatant in Canada as in the United States, it does exist. Members of visible minority groups are discriminated against in employment, housing, and access to public services. The increasing visibility of hate groups and calls to restrict immigration mark the growing tension. Racist attitudes against Asians and Blacks, in particular, have seeped into the criminal justice system. Ironically, since 1960 it has been illegal in Ontario to track crime by race, making it difficult for researchers to collect data. The media, our primary source of information, has sensationalized crimes where minority groups are implicated. Clayton Mosher uses historical data and media reports to expose racism in Canada's social, legal, and criminal justice systems. He considers the social contexts of discrimination, legislation directed against minority groups, law enforcement, and court outcomes. At last, we are offered an objective assessment of racism in Canada. Discrimination and Denial is essential reading for judges, lawyers, police officers, social policy makers, and community leaders. Interpretations of recent events, such as the shooting of officer Todd Baylis by a fugitive alien and gang-style slayings in Toronto's Chinatown, are guaranteed to heat up the embers of public debate.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780802071491 20181008
Law Library (Crown)