%{search_type} search results

87 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
xviii, 244 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: `The Voice of Sanity is Getting Hoarse:' Historical Narratives in Northern Ireland 1. Where, Why, & How `Will We Remember Them?:' The Bloomfield Report Revisited 2. Social Memory 3. State of Exception 4. Hierarchy of Victims 5. Fugitive Roads & Social Hauntings 6. The Politics of Inscription 7. It Should Never be Lost 8. We are All, Potentially, Homines Sacri.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138291515 20180219
Taking Northern Ireland as its primary case study, this book applies the burgeoning literature in memory studies to the primary question of transitional justice: how shall societies and individuals reckon with a traumatic past? Joseph Robinson argues that without understanding how memory shapes, moulds, and frames narratives of the past in the minds of communities and individuals, theorists and practitioners may not be able to fully appreciate the complex, emotive realities of transitional political landscapes. Drawing on interviews with what the author terms "memory curators, " coupled with a robust analysis of secondary literature from a range of transitional cases, the book analyses how the bodies of the dead, the injured, and the traumatised are written into - or written out of - transitional justice. The author argues that scholars cannot appreciate the dynamism of transitional memory-space unless they first engage with the often silenced or marginalised voices whose memories remain trapped behind the antagonistic politics of fear and division. Ultimately challenging the imperative of national reconciliation, the author argues for a politics of public memory that incubates at multiple nodes of social production and can facilitate a vibrant, democratic debate over the ways in which a traumatic past can or should be remembered.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138291515 20180219
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 197 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Resolving the constitutional question
  • Devolution and decommissioning
  • The 'normalisation of security' I : the removal of emergency powers
  • The 'normalisation of security' II : the military in Northern Ireland
  • Normalising policing and justice
  • Paramilitary prisoners
  • Northern Ireland : the new normal?
The Northern Ireland peace process has been heralded by those involved as a successful example of transformation from a violent conflict to a peaceful society. This book examines the implementation of the Belfast Agreement in Northern Ireland, and evaluates whether its goal to establish a normal, peaceful society has been fully realised. Using the political and legal status of England, Scotland and Wales as a comparison, Jessie Blackbourn evaluates eight aspects of Northern Ireland which the Agreement aimed to normalise: the contested constitutional status of Northern Ireland, the devolution of power, decommissioning, the removal of emergency laws, demilitarisation, police reform, criminal justice reform, and paramilitary prisoners. The book highlights the historical context which gave rise to the need for a programme of normalisation within the Belfast Agreement with respect to these areas and assesses the extent to which that programme of normalisation has been successfully implemented. By evaluating the implementation of the Belfast Agreement, the book demonstrates the difficulties that transitional or post-conflict states face in attempting to wind back extraordinary counter-terrorism policies after periods of violence have been brought to an end. The book will be of great use to students and researchers concerned with the emergence, evolution and repeal of anti-terrorism laws, and anyone interested in the history of the conflict and peace process in Northern Ireland.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415714334 20160617
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiv, 386 pages ; 25 cm
  • Crime and criminal justice in Northern Ireland : conflict, transition and the legacy of the past / Clare Dwyer and Anne-Marie McAlinden
  • Criminal justice, truth recovery and dealing with the past in Northern Ireland / Cheryl Lawther
  • Bringing humanity home : a transformational human rights culture for Northern Ireland? / Colin Harvey
  • Criminal justice reform in Northern Ireland : the agents of change / Brice Dickson
  • Governing justice through risk : the development of penal and social policies in a transitional context / Clare Dwyer
  • Policing in transition / John Topping
  • Finding 'merit' in judicial appointments : the Northern Ireland Judicial Appointments Commission (NIJAC) and the search for a new judiciary for Northern Ireland / John Morison
  • Judging and conflict : audience, performance and the judicial past / Kieran McEvoy and Alex Schwartz
  • Prisons and imprisonment in Northern Ireland / Phil Scraton
  • Prisoner reintegration in a transitional society : the Northern Ireland experience / Clare Dwyer
  • Probation and community sanctions in Northern Ireland : historical and contemporary contexts / Nicola Carr
  • Revisiting the past : miscarriages of justice, the courts and transition / Marny Requa
  • Transition, women and criminal justice in Northern Ireland / Linda Moore and Azrini Wahidin
  • Young people, crime and justice in Northern Ireland / Deena Haydon and Siobhán McAlister
  • Public and official responses to sexual and violent crime in Northern Ireland / Anne-Marie McAlinden
  • Restorative justice in the Northern Ireland transition / Anna Eriksson
  • 'Doing' criminal justice in Northern Ireland : 'policy transfer', transitional justice and governing through the past / Anne-Marie McAlinden and Clare Dwyer.
This book represents a critical examination of key aspects of crime and criminal justice in Northern Ireland which will have resonance elsewhere. It considers the core aspects of criminal justice policy-making in Northern Ireland which are central to the process of post-conflict transition, including reform of policing, judicial decision-making and correctional services such as probation and prisons. It examines contemporary trends in criminal justice in Northern Ireland and various dimensions of crime relating to female offenders, young offenders, sexual and violent offenders, community safety and restorative justice. The book also considers the extent to which crime and criminal justice issues in Northern Ireland are being affected by the broader processes of 'policy transfer', globalisation and transnationalism and the extent to which criminal justice in Northern Ireland is divergent from the other jurisdictions in the United Kingdom. Written by leading international authorities in the field, the book offers a snapshot of the cutting edge of critical thinking in criminal justice practice and transitional justice contexts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849465779 20160619
Law Library (Crown)
Book
lix, 676 pages ; 24 cm
  • 1. Introduction Brice Dickson and Brian Gormally 2. Victims ' Rights Brice Dickson 3. Powers of the Police and Army Brice Dickson 4. Questioning Suspects and Witnesses John Jackson, Fiona Doherty and Malachy McGowan 5. Complaints Against the Police Mary O ' Rawe 6. Prisoners ' Rights Jacqueline Monahan and Ann Jemphrey 7. Immigration Anne Grimes and Fidelma O ' Hagan 8. Processions, Protests and Other Meetings Michael Hamilton 9. Freedom of Expression Rory O ' Connell and Paul Mageean 10. Rights to Access Information Colin Harper and Brice Dickson 11. The Right to Privacy Louise Mallinder 12. The Equality Framework in Northern Ireland Debbie Kohner 13. Sex Discrimination Beverley Jones and Joanne White 14. Religious and Political Opinion Discrimination Evelyn Collins 15. Race Discrimination Ciaran White 16. Disability Discrimination George Kilpatrick 17. Sexual Orientation Discrimination Barry Fitzpatrick 18. Age Discrimination Barry Fitzpatrick 19. Mental Disorder Michael Potter 20. Family and Sexual Matters Monica McWilliams, Rhyannon Blythe and Hannah Russell 21. Children ' s Rights The Children ' s Law Centre 22. Education Rights Laura Lundy, Gr a inne McKeever and Viviane Treacy 23. Employment Rights Mark Reid and Caroline Maguire 24. Housing Rights Sharon Geary 25. Social Security Rights Les Allamby 26. Environmental Rights Neil Faris.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849466158 20160618
This Handbook is the latest version of a book that was last published in 2003, and has been completely revised to take account of the innumerable legal developments since then. The book contains 26 chapters on topics ranging across the full spectrum of civil, political, social, economic and environmental rights, with particular emphasis on the right not to be discriminated against. It is currently the most comprehensive and practical publication on the state of human rights in Northern Ireland. This is a part of the world where, as well as ongoing issues arising out of the conflict ('emergency laws' are still in place, for example), there are familiar questions concerning the rights of people with poor mental health, the law relating to family and sexual matters, children's rights, education rights, employment rights, housing rights, and social security rights. The contributors to the book are all experts in their field, most of them with years of experience as human rights activists and advisers. The book provides precise information about relevant legislation and case law (on which there are tables) and is fully indexed.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849466158 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
lxix, 314 pages ; 25 cm
  • Judicial review in Northern Ireland : purposes, sources of law, and constitutional context
  • When is the judicial review procedure used? : the public/private divide and effective alternative remedies
  • The judicial review procedure
  • The grounds for review introduced
  • Illegality
  • Substantive review : Wednesbury, proportionality, legitimate expectation, equality
  • Procedural impropriety
  • Remedies.
This is the second edition of Hart's leading book on the principle and practice of judicial review in Northern Ireland. Providing a fully updated account of the ever-burgeoning body of case law, it divides into eight chapters that consider the purposes of judicial review; the nature of the public-private divide in Northern Ireland law; the judicial review procedure; the grounds for review; and remedies. As with the first edition, the focus of the book is very much on case law that is unique to Northern Ireland, and the book identifies some important differences between principle and practice in Northern Ireland and England and Wales. It also considers the leading Human Rights Act decisions of the Northern Ireland courts and the House of Lords and UK Supreme Court.The book has been written primarily for practitioners of judicial review and uses numbered paragraphs for ease of reference. The book is, however, of much wider interest and is a valuable resource for academics and students alike. Much of the Northern Ireland case law has been concerned with contentious political issues, and the courts have had to consider difficult questions of the constitutional limits to the judicial role in review proceedings. The book should therefore be of use not just to practitioners but also to those involved in the study of judicial reasoning in different jurisdictions (both within the UK and elsewhere).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849462617 20160612
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 200 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Truth, denial and blamelessness
  • Truth, politics and victimhood
  • Truth, trust and (re-)writing the past
  • Truth, confidence and loyalty
  • Truth, sacrifice and betrayal
  • Conclusion: Truth, transition and political responsibility.
Truth, Denial and Transition: Northern Ireland and the Contested Past makes a unique and timely contribution to the transitional justice field. In contrast to the focus on truth and those societies where truth recovery has been central to dealing with the aftermath of human rights violations, comparatively little scholarly attention has been paid to those jurisdictions whose transition from violent conflict has been marked by the absence or rejection of a formal truth process. This book draws upon the case study of Northern Ireland, where, despite a lengthy debate, the question of establishing a formal truth recovery process remains hotly contested. The strongest and most vocal opposition has been from unionist political elites, loyalist ex-combatants and members of the security forces. Based on empirical research, their opposition is unpicked and interrogated at length throughout this book. Critically exploring notions of national imagination and blamelessness, the politics of victimhood and the tension between traditions of sacrifice and the fear of betrayal, this book is the first substantive effort to concentrate on the opponents of truth recovery rather than its advocates. This book will interest those studying truth processes and transitional justice in the fields of Law, Politics, and Criminology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415510141 20160613
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xlviii, 415 pages ; 24 cm
  • The evolution of law-making in Northern Ireland
  • Constitutional law in Northern Ireland
  • Legislation in Northern Ireland
  • Courts and case law in Northern Ireland
  • International law in Northern Ireland
  • Public law in Northern Ireland
  • Criminal law in Northern Ireland
  • Criminal proceedings in Northern Ireland
  • Private law in Northern Ireland
  • Civil proceedings in Northern Ireland
  • Lawyers in Northern Ireland.
This is the latest edition of a book which is the standard introductory text for newcomers to the legal system of Northern Ireland. After explaining how law-making has evolved in Northern Ireland, particularly since the partition of Ireland in 1921, the book devotes separate chapters to the current constitutional position of Northern Ireland, to the making of legislation and case law for that jurisdiction, and to the influence of EU and European Convention law. It examines the principles of public law applying in Northern Ireland and outlines the role of some of the public authorities there. It then moves to chapters on criminal law and criminal procedure, followed by chapters on private law and civil procedure. It ends by examining the legal professions, legal education, the legal aid regimes and legal costs. There are also appendices with sample sources of law. Throughout the book, the focus is on conveying in comprehensible terms the essential features of this small, but historically very controversial, legal jurisdiction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849464598 20160612
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxvii, 445 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Background to the Conflict and the Rights Discourse -- 3. Early Fumblings with the Convention -- 4. Internment and Restrictions on Movement -- 5. Powers of Arrest -- 6. Detention Pending Charge or Trial -- 7. The Right Not to be Ill-treated -- 8. The Right to a Fair Trial -- 9. The Right to Life -- 10. The Right to a Private and Family Life -- 11. Freedom of Expression, Belief, and Assembly -- 12. Freedom from Discrimination -- 13. The Final Picture -- Appendix: Applications lodged in Strasbourg relating to the conflict in Northern Ireland.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199571383 20160604
This book provides the first comprehensive account of the role played by the European Convention on Human Rights during the conflict in Northern Ireland from 1968. Brice Dickson studies the effectiveness of the Convention in protecting human rights in a society wracked by terrorism and deep political conflict, detailing the numerous applications lodged at Strasbourg relating to the conflict and considering how they were dealt with by the enforcement bodies. The book illustrates the limitations inherent in the Convention system but also demonstrates how the European Commission and Court of Human Rights gradually developed a more interventionist approach to the applications emanating from Northern Ireland. In turn this allowed the Convention to become a more secure guarantor of basic rights and freedoms during times of extreme civil unrest and political turmoil elsewhere in Europe. The topics examined include the right to life, the right not to be ill-treated, the right to liberty, the right to a fair trial, the right to a private life, the right to freedom of belief, the right to freedom of expression, the right to freedom of assembly, and the right not to be discriminated against. The book argues that, while eventually the European Court did use the applications from Northern Ireland to establish important human rights principles, their development was slow and arduous and some gaps in protection still remain. The book illustrates the limits of the European Convention as a tool for protecting human rights in times of crisis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199571383 20160604
Law Library (Crown)
Book
lxii, 284 p. ; 25 cm.
  • [1] Judicial Review in Northern Ireland: Contours and Context [2] When is the Judicial Review Procedure Used? [3] The Judicial Review Procedure [4] Jurisdiction, vires, law, and fact [5] Substantive Review: Wednesbury, Proportionality, and Equality [6] Illegality [7] Procedural Impropriety [8] Remedies The European Dimension: EU law and the Human Rights Act 1998 Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781841136172 20160528
This is the first book to be written on the principle and practice of judicial review in Northern Ireland. It collates and discusses the ever-burgeoning body of Northern Ireland case law and divides into eight chapters that consider the purposes of judicial review; the nature of the public-private divide in Northern Ireland law; the judicial review procedure; the grounds for review; and remedies. Much of the case law here is unique to Northern Ireland, and the book identifies actual and potential differences between Northern Ireland case law and that of England and Wales. The book also integrates Human Rights Act 1998 jurisprudence as has been developed by the Northern Ireland courts and by the House of Lords; and it situates much of that case law within wider debates about judicial review as play out in related practitioner and/or academic journals. The book has been written primarily for practitioners of judicial review and uses numbered paragraphs for ease of reference. The book is, however, of a wider interest and it will be a valuable resource for academics and students too. Much of the Northern Ireland case law has been concerned with contentious political issues, and the courts have had to consider difficult questions of the constitutional limits to the judicial role in review proceedings. The book should therefore be of use not just to practitioners but also to those involved in the study of judicial reasoning in different jurisdictions (both within the UK and elsewhere). From the Foreword by Rt Hon Sir Brian Kerr, Lord Chief Justice of Northern Ireland "This important new work by Gordon Anthony will be of inestimable assistance to practitioners and academic commentators alike. It provides a magisterial review of developments in the field of judicial review in this jurisdiction, particularly since the coming into force in October 2000 of the Human Rights Act 1998...(this and other topics are] handled with great authority and clarity...it is certain that this will become an indispensable reference text for those practising in judicial review in this jurisdiction and elsewhere.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781841136172 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xlix, 536 p. ; 21 cm.
  • Northern Ireland's legal history
  • Sources of Northern Ireland's law
  • Legal services
  • Crime and policing
  • Criminal proceedings
  • Civil proceedings
  • Specialised courts
  • Tribunals
  • Official watchdogs.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 325 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Northern Ireland in transition - an introduction, Colin J. Harvey-- the new beginning - reconstructing constitutional law and democracy in Northern Ireland, Colin J. Harvey-- Northern Ireland, devolution and the European Union, Gordon Anthony and Andrew Evans-- equality, Christopher McCrudden-- building a human rights culture in a political democracy - the role of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Colin J. Harvey-- and justice for all? the judiciary and the legal profession in transition, Stephen Livingstone-- shaping the future of criminal justice, John Jackson-- a new beginning for policing in Northern Ireland, Linda Moore and Mary O'Rawe-- human rights, humanitarian interventions and paramilitary activities in Northern Ireland, Kieran McEvoy-- democracy, governance and governmentality - the role of the voluntary sector in the democratic renewal of Northern Ireland, John Morison.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781841131191 20160528
Recent developments in Northern Ireland have correctly been described as historic. While the future of constitutional change is by no means certain, events merit close scrutiny. The Good Friday Agreement 1998 marked a significant departure from incrementalism and thus with the dominant logic of British constitutionalism. The Agreement is in essence a constitutional promise anchored in clear normative principles. Although several aspects of the Agreement are in operation there is no guarantee that this new form of constitutionalism will work. However, the foundations of the settlement are clear. The building blocks reflect a strong commitment to human rights, equality and democratic renewal which encompasses a multiplicity of overlapping relationships. This book examines several key aspects of this complex picture. Developments in Northern Ireland have attracted a large measure of international interest. Reflecting this the contributors demonstrate the links to current controversies in constitutional and human rights law scholarship. At a time when there is much consideration of constitutional change in the UK and beyond, the intention is to offer a collection that both describes the changing legal and political landscape in Northern Ireland and one which provides a significant contribution to current debates on constitutionalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781841131191 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
35 p. ; 23 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
30 p. ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxii, 322 p. ; 24 cm.
Cases connected with the troubles in Northern Ireland have been tried by a judge sitting without a jury in 'Diplock Courts'. Given the symbolic importance of the jury within the common law tradition, this study offers the first systematic comparison of the process of trial by judge alone with that of trial by jury. The authors determine the impact of the replacement of jury trial with trial by a professional judge on the adversarial character of the criminal trial process.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198258896 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 244 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Constitutionalism under assault. Reviving constitutionalism? - the non option of reform. The Northern Ireland Constitutional debate: the Endgame of Westminsterism. The real constitution of Northern Ireland. Getting the business of government done. The external dimension. Northern Ireland and the English problem. A brief political-constitutional chronology.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780421528901 20160527
Reshaping Public Power considers new developments in the exercise of public powers in Britain. Its comprehensive coverage shows the trends nascent in the UK by analysing the use of public powers in Northern Ireland, and illustrates with examples the new ways of approaching government in Northern Ireland. * Provides suitable background reading for constitutional and administrative law courses * Uses Northern Ireland as a case study to illustrate how government works * Offers insight into the trends and possible future development of Westminster-style constitutionalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780421528901 20160527
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 309 p. ; 23 cm.
In the first half of the 1980s a succession of high profile and deeply controversial trials took place in Northern Ireland on the evidence of 'supergrasses' from loyalist and republican paramilitary organisations prepared to betray large numbers of their former alleged confederates in return for immunity from prosecution or lenient sentences and new identities outside Northern Ireland. This, the first thoroughly-researched book-length study of this process, not only carefully documents the central trials - some of which were larger than any other criminal proceedings in the UK or Ireland - but also opens a rare window on the highly secret world of the terrorist groups concerned. The origins of the supergrass system are traced through the complex web of intelligence gathering and counter-terrorist policy in Northern Ireland, and the broader criminal justice and criminological issues are fully explored. The author also compares and contrasts the failure of the supergrass experiment in Northern Ireland with its much more successful counterparts in England, the United States, Italy and Germany, and considers why France and Spain chose not to go down the supergrass path. The publication of this book could hardly be more timely. Northern Ireland is once again at the top of the political agenda in the United Kingdom and Ireland, and the recent ceasefires have ensured that the Troubles are the focus of renewed international attention. The need for strong due process rights in the criminal justice system as part of an overall settlement of the Ulster conflict is firmly underlined, and the study adds further support to the case for more effective mechanisms of public accountability over policing and intelligence-gathering in liberal democracies generally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198257660 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 309 p. ; 23 cm.
In the first half of the 1980s a succession of high profile and deeply controversial trials took place in Northern Ireland on the evidence of 'supergrasses' from loyalist and republican paramilitary organisations prepared to betray large numbers of their former alleged confederates in return for immunity from prosecution or lenient sentences and new identities outside Northern Ireland. This, the first thoroughly-researched book-length study of this process, not only carefully documents the central trials - some of which were larger than any other criminal proceedings in the UK or Ireland - but also opens a rare window on the highly secret world of the terrorist groups concerned. The origins of the supergrass system are traced through the complex web of intelligence gathering and counter-terrorist policy in Northern Ireland, and the broader criminal justice and criminological issues are fully explored. The author also compares and contrasts the failure of the supergrass experiment in Northern Ireland with its much more successful counterparts in England, the United States, Italy and Germany, and considers why France and Spain chose not to go down the supergrass path. The publication of this book could hardly be more timely. Northern Ireland is once again at the top of the political agenda in the United Kingdom and Ireland, and the recent ceasefires have ensured that the Troubles are the focus of renewed international attention. The need for strong due process rights in the criminal justice system as part of an overall settlement of the Ulster conflict is firmly underlined, and the study adds further support to the case for more effective mechanisms of public accountability over policing and intelligence-gathering in liberal democracies generally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198257660 20160528
Green Library
Book
245 p. ; 30 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 387 p. ; 21 cm.
Law Library (Crown)