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Book
558 p. ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
191 p. ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
517 pages ; 24 cm.
The manuscript of the 'Aqwal Qatada' has repeatedly attracted particular interest among modern scholars, as it raises questions concerning the early development of the 'Ibadi' Basran community and the emergence of Islamic jurisprudence in Iraq. It is a unique document because it attests to the existence of a scholarly link between 'Sunnis' and 'Ibadis' during the early development of Islamic law. The fact that the legal responsa and traditions of Qatada b. Di'ama al-Sadusi (60/680-117/735) are part of an 'Ibadi' collection, in which the traditions of Ibadi Imam Jabir b. Zayd (d. 93/ 711) have been transmitted through 'Amr b. Harim and 'Amr b. Dinar, proves that the Ibadi lawyers of the first generations considered Qatada to be a faithful upholder of Jabir's doctrine. Given the lack of material available for 'Jabir', instructions must have been given to collect whatever was transmitted through Qatada. Qatada's legal responsa must have corresponded to those of the first Ibadi authorities, which explains why the collator of the Aqwal Qatada (probably Abu Ghanim al-Khurasani) included them in an Ibadi manuscript. The present volume sheds light on the relationship between the 'Aqwal Qatada 'and 'Ibadi' authorities such as al-Rabi, Abu Ubayda, and Jabir.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
516 pages ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
376 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
159 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
269 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 208 pages ; 25 cm.
  • An introduction to Islamic law and commerce : the basics
  • Are Islamic commercial laws proper and normative laws? or simply "Primitive" and "religious and moral codes"?
  • Competence by encompassing
  • Does Islamic commercial law have the specific competence to govern modern complex commercial and financial transactions?
Islamic Commercial Law: Contemporariness, Normativeness and Competence' offers new perspectives on why for centuries Islamic commercial law has been perceived as arbitrary and unpredictable, and on its evolution to a contemporary, consistent, reliable and credible body of law. The book also examines why Western positivists have viewed Islamic commercial law in a simplistic or archaic religious framework and counters those arguments with an examination of its normative legal qualities. The work analyses the competencies of Fiqh (jurisprudence) for structuring new financial instruments, and restructuring conventional financial products more equitability.0.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
544 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
135 p. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
4 volumes ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
366 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
336 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
246 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
462 pages ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
448 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
256 pages ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
607 pages ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
664 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
208 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)