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Book
92, 436 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Defining al-qawāʻid and al-qawāʻid al-fiqhiyyah
  • The relation between al-qawāʻid al-fiqhiyyah and al-Ashbāh wa'l-naẓāʼir
  • The origins of al-qawāʻid al-fiqhiyyah
  • The development of al-qawāʻid al-fiqhiyyah
  • The purpose of al-qawāʼid al-fiqhiyyah
  • Ibn Nujaym and his al-Ashbāh wa'l-naẓāʼir
  • Abū 'l-Suʻūd and his commentary
  • The manuscripts
  • The edited text of ʻUmdat al-nāẓir.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
116 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
120 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
367 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
558 p. ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
511 p. ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
254 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
272 p. ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
350 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
685 p. ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
344 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
175 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
120 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 476 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Formation and development of territorial concepts in the pre-modern period
  • Debates on territoriality in the modern period
  • Dār al-islām versus Dār al-Kufr : reinventing traditional binaries
  • Dār al-islām and the West : a contractual relationship
  • Dār al-islām relocated : how "Islamic" is the West?
  • Rethinking territoriality beyond Dār al-islām : alternative calls for overcoming geo-religious boundaries
  • Territoriality, residence, and legal interpretation in the West
  • Territoriality, authority, and identity
  • Conclusion.
Where is dar al-islam, and who defines its boundaries in the 21st century? In Dar al-Islam Revisited. Territoriality in Contemporary Islamic Legal Discourse on Muslims in the West, Sarah Albrecht explores the variety of ways in which contemporary Sunni Muslim scholars, intellectuals, and activists reinterpret the Islamic legal tradition of dividing the world into dar al-islam, the "territory of Islam, " dar al-harb, the "territory of war, " and other geo-religious categories. Starting with an overview of the rich history of debate about this tradition, this book traces how and why territorial boundaries have remained a matter of controversy until today. It shows that they play a crucial role in current discussions of religious authority, identity, and the interpretation of the shari'a in the West.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004364547 20180806
Law Library (Crown)
Book
415 p. ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1057 pages ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
516 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction Arabic Texts a. Part One b. Part Two c. Part Three d. Part Four e. Part Five f. Part Six g. Part Seven Indices.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004339477 20180423
The manuscript of the Aqwal Qatada has repeatedly attracted particular interest among modern scholars, as it raises questions concerning the early development of the Ibadi Basran community and the emergence of Islamic jurisprudence in Iraq. It is a unique document because it attests to the existence of a scholarly link between Sunnis and Ibadis during the early development of Islamic law. The fact that the legal responsa and traditions of Qatada b. Di'ama al-Sadusi (60/680-117/735) are part of an Ibadi collection, in which the traditions of Ibadi Imam Jabir b. Zayd (d. 93/ 711) have been transmitted through 'Amr b. Harim and 'Amr b. Dinar, proves that the Ibadi lawyers of the first generations considered Qatada to be a faithful upholder of Jabir's doctrine. Given the lack of material available for Jabir, instructions must have been given to collect whatever was transmitted through Qatada. Qatada's legal responsa must have corresponded to those of the first Ibadi authorities, which explains why the collator of the Aqwal Qatada (probably Abu Ghanim al-Khurasani) included them in an Ibadi manuscript. The present volume sheds light on the relationship between the Aqwal Qatada and Ibadi authorities such as al-Rabi, Abu Ubayda, and Jabir.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004339477 20180423
Green Library
Book
1 volume (various pagings) ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction Arabic Texts a. Part One b. Part Two c. Part Three d. Part Four e. Part Five f. Part Six g. Part Seven Indices.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004339477 20180423
The manuscript of the Aqwal Qatada has repeatedly attracted particular interest among modern scholars, as it raises questions concerning the early development of the Ibadi Basran community and the emergence of Islamic jurisprudence in Iraq. It is a unique document because it attests to the existence of a scholarly link between Sunnis and Ibadis during the early development of Islamic law. The fact that the legal responsa and traditions of Qatada b. Di'ama al-Sadusi (60/680-117/735) are part of an Ibadi collection, in which the traditions of Ibadi Imam Jabir b. Zayd (d. 93/ 711) have been transmitted through 'Amr b. Harim and 'Amr b. Dinar, proves that the Ibadi lawyers of the first generations considered Qatada to be a faithful upholder of Jabir's doctrine. Given the lack of material available for Jabir, instructions must have been given to collect whatever was transmitted through Qatada. Qatada's legal responsa must have corresponded to those of the first Ibadi authorities, which explains why the collator of the Aqwal Qatada (probably Abu Ghanim al-Khurasani) included them in an Ibadi manuscript. The present volume sheds light on the relationship between the Aqwal Qatada and Ibadi authorities such as al-Rabi, Abu Ubayda, and Jabir.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004339477 20180423
Law Library (Crown)
Book
448 pages ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
304 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)