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Book
2 volumes ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 424 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Can we even speak of "Judaism and law"? / Christine Hayes
  • Law in biblical Israel / Chaya Halberstam
  • Law in Jewish society of the second temple period / Seth Schwartz
  • Law in classical rabbinic Judaism / Christine Hayes
  • Approaches to foreign law in biblical Israel and classical Judaism through the medieval period / Beth Berkowitz, Barnard College
  • Law in medieval Judaism / Warren Zev Harvey
  • From enlightenment to emancipation / Verena Kasper-Marienberg
  • Enlightenment conceptions of Judaism and law / Eliyahu Stern
  • Rethinking Halakhah in modern Eastern Europe : mysticism, antinomianism, positivism / Menachem Lorberbaum
  • Antinomianism and its responses : 19th century / David Ellenson
  • New developments in modern Jewish thought : from theology to law and ack again / Yonatan Brafman
  • Judaism, Jewish law in pre-state Palestine / Amihai Radzyner
  • Judaism, Jewish law and the Jewish state in Israel / Arye Edrei
  • What does it mean for a state to be Jewish? / Daphne Barak Erez
  • Fault lines / Patricia J. Woods.
"[This book] explores the Jewish conception of law as an essential component of the divine-human relationship from biblical to modern times, as well as resistance to this conceptualization. It also traces the political, social, intellectual, and cultural circumstances that spawned competing Jewish approaches to its own 'divine' law and the 'non-divine' law of others, including that of the modern, secular state of Israel. Part I focuses on the emergence and development of law as an essential element of religious expression in biblical Israel and classical Judaism through the medieval period. Part II considers the ramifications for the law arising from political emancipation and the invention of Judaism as a 'religion' in the modern period. Finally, Part III traces the historical and ideological processes leading to the current configuration of religion and state in modern Israel, analysing specific conflicts between religious law and state law."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 424 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: can we even speak of "Judaism and law"? / Christine Hayes
  • Law in biblical Israel / Chaya Halberstam
  • Law in Jewish society of the second temple period / Seth Schwartz
  • Law in classical rabbinic Judaism / Christine Hayes
  • Approaches to secular law in biblical Israel and classical Judaism through the medieval period / Beth Berkowitz
  • Law in medieval Judaism / Warren Zev Harvey
  • From Enlightenment to emancipation / Verena Kasper-Marienberg
  • Enlightenment conceptions of Judaism and law / Eliyahu Stern
  • Rethinking Halakhah in modern Eastern Europe : mysticism, antinomianism, positivism / Menachem Lorberbaum
  • Antinomianism and its responses in the nineteenth century / David Ellenson
  • New developments in modern Jewish thought : from theology to law and back again / Yonatan Y. Brafman
  • Judaism and Jewish law in pre-state Palestine / Amihai Radzyner
  • Judaism, Jewish law and the Jewish state in Israel / Arye Edrei
  • What does it mean for a state to be Jewish? / Daphne Barak-Erez
  • Fault lines / Patricia J. Woods.
Green Library
Book
180 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • Orach chaim : daily, sabbath, and holiday laws
  • Yoreh deah: laws of kashrut, idolatry, loan interest, nidda, vows, honoring ones's parents and the elderly, charity, circumcision of sons, conversion, sacred writings, agrarian living, mourning
  • Even haezer : procreation, permitted and forbidden marriage partners, celebrating weddings, marital obligations and rights, divorce, levirate marriage and release, raped or seduced child
  • Choshen mishpat : rabbinic courts, loans, oppressing/cheating/overpricing, gifts causa mortis, objects lost and found, inheritance, paying monies owed
  • Conclusion.
"While the topic of conversion in Judaism has been extensively covered, no one has explored the particular laws related to after conversion. [This book] explores many topics and questions that revolve around the life of a Jewish convert. Such topics include the place of a convert in a Jewish community according to Jewish law, the treatment of a convert in respect to acceptance and discrimination, and providing affirmative incentives to converts."-- Back cover.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 106 pages ; 22 cm.
  • 1. Beginnings2. Saying, Writing, Doing3. Shared Spacetime: Community4. The IneffableEpilogue. Parting ways.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319688305 20180213
In a work that casts philosophical and theological reflections against a backdrop of personal experience, Leon Wiener Dow offers a learned discourse that elucidates the telos of Jewish law and the philosophical-theological commitments that animate it. To the reader gazing upon the halakha from the outside, this book offers a glimpse of its central, orienting concepts. To the reader who lives amidst the rigor of halakha, this book bestows an insightful glance at the law's orienting ethos and higher aspirations that often remain opaque.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319688305 20180213
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 106 pages ; 22 cm.
  • 1. Beginnings2. Saying, Writing, Doing3. Shared Spacetime: Community4. The IneffableEpilogue. Parting ways.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319688305 20180213
In a work that casts philosophical and theological reflections against a backdrop of personal experience, Leon Wiener Dow offers a learned discourse that elucidates the telos of Jewish law and the philosophical-theological commitments that animate it. To the reader gazing upon the halakha from the outside, this book offers a glimpse of its central, orienting concepts. To the reader who lives amidst the rigor of halakha, this book bestows an insightful glance at the law's orienting ethos and higher aspirations that often remain opaque.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319688305 20180213
Green Library
Book
xvii, 489 pages ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 212 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • Regulating marital relations between spouses by consent
  • "Freedom of contract" in Jewish family law : the differences between the Babylonian and Palestinian Talmuds
  • Is there really no conditional marriage?
  • Temporary marriage : a possible solution to the problem of the agunah?
  • Towards establishing halakhic parenthood by agreement?
  • Epilogue.
Traditional Jewish family law has persevered for hundreds of years and rules covering marriage, the raising of children, and divorce are well established; yet pressures from modern society are causing long held views to be re-examined. The Jewish Family: Between Family Law and Contract Law examines the tenets of Jewish family law in the light of new attitudes concerning the role of women, assisted reproduction technologies, and prenuptial agreements. It explores, through interdisciplinary research combining the legal aspects of family law and contract law, how the Jewish family can cope with both old and modern obstacles and challenges. Focusing on the nexus of Jewish family law and contract law to propose how 'freedom of contract' can be part of how family law can be interpreted, The Jewish Family will appeal to practitioners, activists, academic researchers, and laymen readers who are interested in the fields of law, theology, and social science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107163409 20180219
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 212 pages ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Regulating marital relations between spouses by consent-- 2. 'Freedom of contract' in Jewish family law - the differences between the Babylonian and Palestinian Talmuds-- 3. Is there really no conditional marriage?-- 4. Temporary marriage - a possible solution to the problem of the Agunah?-- 5. Towards establishing Halakhic parenthood by agreement?-- Index-- Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107163409 20180213
Traditional Jewish family law has persevered for hundreds of years and rules covering marriage, the raising of children, and divorce are well established; yet pressures from modern society are causing long held views to be re-examined. The Jewish Family: Between Family Law and Contract Law examines the tenets of Jewish family law in the light of new attitudes concerning the role of women, assisted reproduction technologies, and prenuptial agreements. It explores, through interdisciplinary research combining the legal aspects of family law and contract law, how the Jewish family can cope with both old and modern obstacles and challenges. Focusing on the nexus of Jewish family law and contract law to propose how 'freedom of contract' can be part of how family law can be interpreted, The Jewish Family will appeal to practitioners, activists, academic researchers, and laymen readers who are interested in the fields of law, theology, and social science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107163409 20180213
Green Library
Book
42 pages ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 255 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Preface
  • About the Jewish Law Caucus
  • Introduction
  • General works on Jewish law
  • Subject-specific works on Jewish law.
"Jewish law courses, scholarship, and collections have been increasing in frequency and size in American law schools for several decades. Today many law schools house institutes and centers for the study of Jewish law. This bibliography documents the history and content of the Jewish law scholarship that is at the foundation of these institutes. Entries come mostly from American law reviews, but some articles published in other countries, mainly Britain, Canada, and Israel, are also included. The articles and annotations are arranged under 37 topics, in chronological order. A small glossary at the end provides definitions of terms that are commonly addressed in the annotations, and is followed by an author index."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 255 pages ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
2 volumes ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 243 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • The biblical, traditional, and historical backdrop
  • Biblical injunctions
  • From community regulation to big business
  • Governmental intervention and involvement
  • The limits of law in regulating religious rules
  • Bans on shechitah
  • The problem with statutory regulation
  • Kashrus and the courts
  • Perceptions, politics, and filthy lucre
  • "Something ain't kosher here"
  • Kosher certification agencies
  • Law and politics in the cutthroat business
  • Kosher meat scandals in America and abroad
  • Oddities and excesses.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
24, 962, 17 pages ; 28 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
24, 962, 17 pages ; 28 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 242 pages ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Legal essentialism
  • Hierarchy and exclusivity
  • Time and space
  • Obligation and authority
  • Intent and responsibility
  • Retribution and control
  • Shifting from theory to practice
  • Association and admission
  • Covenant and initiation
  • Officers and leaders
  • Reproof and mediation
  • Punishment and exclusion
  • Conclusion.
This book offers a novel approach for the study of law in the Judean Desert Scrolls, using the prism of legal theory. Following a couple of decades of scholarly consensus withdrawing from the "Essene hypothesis, " it proposes to revive the term, and suggests employing it for the sectarian movement as a whole, while considering the group that lived in Qumran as the Yahad. It further proposes a new suggestion for the emergence of the Yahad, based on the roles of the Examiner and the Instructor in the two major legal codes, the Damascus Document and the Community Rule. The understanding of Essene law is divided into concepts and practices, in order to emphasize the discrepancy between creed, rhetoric, and practices. The abstract exploration of notions such as time, space, obligation, intention, and retribution, is then compared against the realities of social practices, including admission, initiation, covenant, leadership, reproof, and punishment. The legal analysis yields several new suggestions for the study of the scrolls: first, Amihay proposes to rename the two strands of thought of Jewish law, formerly referred to as "nominalism" and "realism, " with the terms "legal essentialism" and "legal formalism." The two laws of admission in the Community Rule are distinguished as two different laws, one of an association for a group as a whole, the other as an admission of an individual. The law of reproof is proven to be an independent legal procedure, rather than a preliminary stage of prosecution. The methodological division in this study of thought and practice provides a nuanced approach for the study of law in general, and religious law in particular.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190631017 20170206
Law Library (Crown)
Book
471 pages ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
295 pages ; 24 cm
  • Formation et dissolution du couple -- Bases légales du mariage -- La nature de l'union -- Les origines -- Les kidoushine -- Kidoushine par de l'argent -- Par un écrit -- Relation intime -- Procédure du mariage -- Âge requis pour le mariage -- Le rôle des témoins -- Critères de validation des témoins -- Le térnoignage des femmes -- L'âge des témoins -- Les arguments des rabbins -- Définition de la 'hazaka -- La non transgression des mitsvot (commandements) -- Les liens familiaux -- Conditions de fond du mariage -- La polygamie -- Unions interdites et leurs conséquences -- L'inceste -- Définition d'un mamzer -- Unions interdites pouvant produire un mamzer -- Unions interdites par le Code civil -- Définition d'une femme mariée au regard de la halakha -- Unions interdites au cohen -- Les interdits matrimoniaux du cohen -- Unions interdites au cohen gadol (grand prêtre) -- Raisons des interdits matrimoniaux supplémentaires du cohen -- Conséquences des unions interdites -- Enfants issus d'une zékouka layavam -- Le cas du mamzer -- Unions interdites -- Unions permises -- Mariage d'une femme n'ayant pas reçu le Guet [ou dont le mari a été déclaré disparu], avec un homme avec lequel elle aura cohabité durant cette période -- Déroulement des kidoushine -- La bénédiction des kidoushine -- La remise des kidoushine -- La ketoubah [contrat de mariage] -- Les origines et la rédaction de la ketoubah -- Les origines -- La rédaction -- L'acquisition de la ketoubah (kinyiane) -- L'utilité du kinyiane -- Engagement du marié sur des biens inexistants -- Engagement écrit -- La procédure du kinyiane -- Le kinyiane d'une ketoubah -- Les nissouine -- Définitions du yi'houd -- La 'houpa en usage dans le monde ashkénaze et dans les mondes séfarade -- Préparatifs des nissouine -- Les mariés -- La `houpa -- Les sept bénédictions -- Le bris du verre -- Qui célèbre le mariage ? -- Le mariage civil -- Le mariage religieux -- Le divorce -- Le divorce dans ses formes traditionnelles -- Les sources -- Les conditions de forme -- Le guet -- Délivrance du guet -- Écriture du guet -- La forme du guet -- Remise du guet -- Les conditions de fond -- Une forme originale de mariage, le yboum (lévirat) et de divorce, la 'halitsa (déchaussement) -- Le lévirat -- La 'halitsa ou déchaussement -- Les accords prénuptiaux (prenuptial agreement ou PNA) -- Les sources des PNA -- Les buts des PNA -- Le PNA du Beth-Din d'Amérique -- Le PNA du Beth-Din de Londres -- Le PNA des rabbins de l'organisme TSOHAR -- Les fondements du PNA en droit rabbinique -- Le cas particulier des `agounot -- Notions de 'agounot -- Principales sources, tirées du Talmud et du Shoullan 'Aroukh, pour la fixation de la halakha -- Les dispositions essentielles des sources de la halakha -- Décisions de principe en certains cas de disparition, servant de base à l'appréciation des cas particuliers, par voie d'assimilation ou de comparaison -- Principales sources, tirées des décisionnaires, pour la fixation de la halakha -- Présentation de pratiques notables -- Le Titanic -- La Shoa
  • Le sous-marin Dakar -- Les événements -- Les conséquences -- Le World Trade Center (11 septembre 2001) -- Les clauses résolutoires -- Les clauses résolutoires dans le droit rabbinique -- Approche générale de la clause résolutoire -- Les sources -- Sources dans la Torah -- Sources dans le Talmud et les décisionnaires -- Spécificités des clauses résolutoires appliquées au mariage et au divorce -- Les sources -- En matière de kidoushine -- Clauses résolutoires en matière de nissouine -- Les sources -- Développements à partir des sources -- Les Responsa -- Le projet des rabbins français (1907) -- Thèse des rabbins français -- Arguments contre les projets du grand-rabbin Joseph Lehmann et des rabbins français -- Les projets des rabbins algériens -- Le premier projet élaboré pour les juifs d'Algérie -- Le projet du rabbin Ben Tsion Alkalaï -- Le projet du grand-rabbin 'Hayim Blia'h (Tlemcen) -- Le projet du grand-rabbin David Cohen-Scali (Oran) -- L'ébauche de projet de Sidi Fredj Halimi, grand-rabbin de Constantine (1931) -- Le projet du grand-rabbin Ben-Tsion Méir 'Hay Ouziel, grand-rabbin Séfarade de Tel Aviv-Jaffa (1935) -- Thèse du Grand-rabbin Ouziel -- Peut-il y avoir des nissouine conditionnels ? -- Peut-on annuler des kidoushine ? -- Peut-on émettre une clause résolutoire afin que la femme ne soit pas liée par les liens du lévirat ? -- Peut-il y avoir une clause résolutoire dans un cas d'apostasie ou dans le cas d'un prosélyte revenu à son ancienne foi ? -- Mises en oeuvre de clauses résolutoires -- Clauses résolutoires appliquées au divorce -- Guet sous conditions -- Théories -- Applications -- Les mises en place de clause résolutoire -- La clause Lieberman -- Les réactions à la clause Lieberman -- Clauses résolutoires appliquées au lévirat.
"De nos jours, des centaines de femmes de par le monde sont concernées par le problème des 'agounot. Le cas se présente quand le mari refuse la délivrance du guet (acte de divorce religieux), ou qu'il est présumé décédé mais que sa mort n'est pas avérée au regard du droit rabbinique. Il peut également s'agir de femmes liées par l'obligation de procéder soit au lévirat (yiboum), soit au "déchaussement" (halitsa), lorsque leur conjoint est mort sans laisser de descendance. Chacun des cas évoqués a des incidences différentes, non seulement pour la femme concernée mais aussi pour le statut des enfants qu'elle serait amenée à avoir dans le cadre d'une nouvelle union où peut se poser le problème du mamzer (enfant adultérin ou incestueux), spécifique au judaïsme. D'où la volonté constamment manifestée par les rabbins de trouver une solution juridique aux incidences humaines des agounot. L'une des solutions envisagées a consisté à instaurer des mariages "à clause résolutoire". Depuis quelques années, d'autres solutions ont été explorées (introduction de contrats prénuptiaux ou lois sur le guet...) dans les pays anglo-saxons, avec des fortunes diverses. Ces solutions, sans présupposer de leur valeur halakhique (droit hébraïque), sont-elles transposables en France? Le présent ouvrage tente de répondre à ces questions. Le problème des 'agounot est donc d'une actualité brûlante, tant du point de vue humain que de celui de la théorie du droit."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
xxxviii, 271 pages ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)