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Journal/Periodical
v. ; 26 cm.
www.heinonline.org For assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
www.heinonline.org For assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 23 cm.
Journal/Periodical
v. ; 23 cm.
www.heinonline.org For assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
www.heinonline.org for assistance ask at the Stanford Law Library reference desk.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 289 pages ; 26 cm
  • What does and should influence the number of lawyers? / Richard L. Abel
  • Too many lawyers? : or should lawyers be doing other things? / Carrie Joan Menkel-Meadow
  • Unauthorized practice of law and the production of lawyers / Neta Ziv
  • The flood of US lawyers : natural fluctuation or professional climate change? / Bruce A. Green
  • It's the law schools stupid! : explaining the continuing increase in the number of lawyers / Herbert M. Kritzer
  • Coping with the consequences of 'too many lawyers' : securing the place of international graduate law students / Carole Silver
  • Effects of the acceleration in the number of lawyers in Israel / Limor Zer-Gutman
  • The new knowledge economy and the transformation of the law discipline / Margaret Thornton
  • Is access to the profession access to justice? : lessons from Canada / Avner Levin & Asher Alkoby
  • The 'overcrowding the profession' argument and the professional melting pot / Eyal Katvan
  • Setting the limits : who controls the size of the legal profession in Japan? / Kay-Wah Chan
  • Legal education in Spain : challenges and risks in devising access to the legal professions / Laura Carballo Piñeiro
  • The virtue of low barriers to becoming a lawyer : promoting liberal and democratic values / Russell G. Pearce & Sinna Nasseri
  • 'I love my American job' : professional prestige in the Indian outsourcing industry and global consequences of an expanding legal profession / Swethaa Ballakrishnen.
The topic of "too many lawyers" is both timely and timeless. The future make up and performance of the legal profession is in contest, challenged by new entrants, technology and the demand for transparency; at the same time, lawyers long have participated in contests over professional boundaries. In this book, we take up several fundamental questions about the question of whether there are "too many lawyers". What do we mean by "too many"? Is there a surplus of lawyers? What sort of lawyers are and will be needed? How best can we discern this? These questions and more are addressed here in scholarly articles presented at the Onati International Institute for the Sociology of Law (Spain) by some of the best researchers in the field. The collection, witha chapter by Prof. Richard L. Abel, addresses methodological, normative and policy questions regarding the number of lawyers in particular countries and worldwide, while connecting this phenomenon to political, social, economic, historical, cultural and comparative contexts. This book was previously published as a special issue of the International Journal of the Legal Profession.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138212794 20170220
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 429 pages ; 27 cm
  • Introduction / Erik Larson and Patrick Schmidt
  • Do the "haves" still come out ahead? / Joel B. Grossman, Herbert M. Kritzer, and Stewart Macaulay
  • The rule of law and the litigation process : the paradox of losing by winning / Catherine Albiston
  • The good case : decisions to litigate at the World Trade Organization / Joseph A. Conti
  • Convictability and discordant locales : reproducing race, class, and gender ideology in prosecutorial decisionmaking / Lisa Frohmann
  • The reconstitution of law in local settings : agency discretion, ambiguity, and a surplus of law in policing hate crime / Ryken Grattet and Valerie Jenness
  • Popular constitutionalism's hard when you're not very popular : why the ACLU turned to courts / Emily Zackin
  • Beyond backlash: assessing the impact of judicial decisions on LGBT rights / Thomas M. Keck
  • Explaining corporate environmental performance : how does regulation matter? / Robert A. Kagan, Dorothy Thornton, and Neil Gunningham
  • The "compliance" trap : the moral message in responsive regulatory enforcement / Christine Parker
  • Labor regulation, corporate governance, and legal origin : a case of institutional complementarity? / Beth Ahlering and Simon Deakin
  • Internal dispute resolution : the transformation of civil rights in the workplace / Lauren B. Edelman, Howard S. Erlanger, and John Lande
  • The privatization of public legal rights : how manufacturers construct the meaning of consumer law / Shauhin A. Talesh
  • Do rankings matter? : the effects of U.S. News & World Report rankings on the admissions process of law schools / Michael Sauder and Ryon Lancaster
  • Lawyer satisfaction in the process of structuring legal careers / Ronit Dinovitzer and Bryant G. Garth
  • The changing character of lawyers' work : Chicago in 1975 and 1995 / John P. Heinz, Edward O. Laumann, Robert L. Nelson, and Ethan Michelson
  • Lawyers, mediation, and the management of divorce practice / Craig A. McEwen, Lynn Mather, and Richard J. Maiman
  • The impact of legal counsel on outcomes for poor tenants in New York City's Housing Court : results of a randomized experiment / Carroll Seron, Gregg Van Ryzin, Martin Frankel, and Jean Kovath
  • Cause lawyering in transnational perspective : national conflict and human rights in Israel/Palestine / Lisa Hajjar
  • A new social constructionism for sociolegal studies / Elizabeth Mertz
  • Litigating within relationships : disputes and disturbance in the regulatory process / Cary Coglianese
  • Pursuing rights and getting justice on China's ethnic frontier, 1949-1966 / Neil J. Diamant
  • Framing the choice between cash and the courthouse : experiences with the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund / Gillian K. Hadfield
  • Justice excused : the deployment of law in everyday political encounters / George I. Lovell
  • Three strikes and you are out, but why? : the psychology of public support for punishing rule breakers / Tom R. Tyler and Robert J. Boeckmann
  • Situating legal consciousness : experiences and attitudes of ordinary citizens about law and street harassment / Laura Beth Nielsen
  • Idle rights : employees' rights consciousness and the construction of sexual harassment policies / Anna-Maria Marshall
  • Mobilizing the law in china : "informed disenchantment" and the development of legal consciousness / Mary E. Gallagher
  • Competing institutions : law, medicine, and family in neonatal intensive care / Carol A. Heimer
  • Challenging medicine : law, resistance, and the cultural politics of childbirth / Katherine Beckett and Bruce Hoffman
  • Alternative readings : the status of the Status of Children Act in Antigua and Barbuda / Mindie Lazarus-Black
  • Landscapes of the law : injury, remedy, and social change in Thailand / David M. Engel
  • Truth, reconciliation, and the creation of a human rights culture in South Africa / James L. Gibson
  • Rights, religion, and community : approaches to violence against women in the context of globalization / Sally Engle Merry
  • Merchants of law as moral entrepreneurs : constructing international justice from the competition for transnational business disputes / Yves Dezalay and Bryant Garth
  • National politics as international process : the case of anti-female genital cutting laws / Elizabeth Heger Boyle and Sharon E. Preves
  • Through a green lens : construction of customary environmental law and community in Indonesia's Muluku Islands / Charles Zerner
  • Unsuitable suitors : anti-miscegenation laws, naturalization laws, and the construction of Asian identities / Deenesh Sohoni
  • Think of the hippopotamus : rights consciousness in the fat acceptance movement / Anna Kirkland
  • Legitimizing American indian sovereignty : mobilizing the constitutive power of law through institutional entrepreneurship / Erich W. Steinman
  • Blue jeans, rape, and the "de-constitutive" power of law / Kitty Calavita
  • Do blind people see race : social, legal, and theoretical considerations / Osagie K. Obasogie
  • From legal realism to law and society : reshaping law for the last stages of the social activist state / Bryant Garth and Joyce Sterling
  • What counts as knowledge? : a reflection on race, social science, and the law / Rachel F. Moran.
Law and society scholars challenge the common belief that law is simply a neutral tool by which society sets standards and resolves disputes. Decades of research shows how much the nature of communities, organizations, and the people inhabiting them affect how law works. Just as much, law shapes beliefs, behaviors, and wider social structures, but the connections are much more nuanced - and surprising - than many expect. Law and Society Reader II provides readers an accessible overview to the breadth of recent developments in this research tradition, bringing to life the developments in this dynamic field. Following up a first Law and Society Reader published in 1995, editors Erik W. Larson and Patrick D. Schmidt have compiled excerpts of 43 illuminating articles published since 1993 in The Law & Society Review, the flagship journal of the Law and Society Association. By its organization and approach, this volume enables readers to join in discussing the key ideas of law and society research. The selections highlight the core insights and developments in this research tradition, making these works indispensable for those exploring the field and ideal for classroom use. Across six concisely-introduced sections, this volume analyzes inequality, lawyering, the relation between law and organizations, and the place of law in relation to other social institutions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814770818 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 525 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
  • Part 1: Foundations 1. Langdon Winner. "Do Artifacts Have Politics?" Daedalus 109.1 (1980): 121-136 (excerpt from 'The Whale and the Reactor' 2. Arie Rip. "Introduction of New Technology: Making Use of Recent Insights from Sociology and Economics of Technology." Technology Analysis & Strategic Management 7.4 (1995): 417-432 3. Bill Joy. "Why the Future Doesn't Need Us." Wired, (April 2000) 4. John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. "A Response to Bill Joy and the Doom-and-Gloom Technofuturists." AAAS Science and Technology Policy Yearbook 2001, edited by Albert H. Teich, Stephen D. Nelson Celia McEnaney and Stephen J. Lita, (2001) 77-83. Part 2: Ethics & Public Policy 5. Braden Allenby. "The Industrial Ecology of Emerging Technologies." Journal of Industrial Ecology 13.2 (2009): 168-183 6. Amy Gutmann. "The Ethics of Synthetic Biology: Guiding Principles for Emerging Technologies." Hastings Center Report 41.4 (2011): 17-22. 7. Gary Marchant, Ann Meyer, Megan Scanlon. 'Integrating Social and Ethical Concerns into Regulatory Decision-Making for Emerging Technologies', 11 Minnesota J. Law Science & Technology 345-363 (2010) 8. Richard Owen, Phil Macnaghten and Jack Stilgoe. "Responsible Research and Innovation: From Science in Society to Science for Society, with Society." Science and Public Policy 39.6 (2012): 751-760. 9. Alfred Nordmann. Discussion Paper: Responsible Innovation, the Art and Craft of Anticipation." Journal of Responsible Innovation (2014): Vol. 1-1, pp 87-98 Part 3: Public Perception and Participation 10. Paul Slovic. "Perception of Risk." Science 236.4799 (April 1987): 280-285 11. Brian Wynne. "Unruly Technology: Practical Rules, Impractical Discourses and Public Understanding." Social Studies of Science 18.1 (1988): 147-167 12. Sheila Jasanoff. "Technologies of Humility: Citizen Participation in Governing Science, " Minerva 41.3 (2003): 223-244. 13. Richard H. Thaler and Cass Sunstein. "Libertarian Paternalism." The American Economic Review (2003), Vol. 93, No. 2: 175-179 14. Michael D, Cobb and Jane Macoubrie. "Public Perceptions About Nanaotechnology: Risks, Benefits and Trust." Journal of Nanoparticle Research 6.4 (2004): 395-405. Part 4: Risk Assessment and the Precautionary Principle 15. Per Sandin. "Dimensions of the precautionary principle." Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal 5.5 (1999): 889-907 16. David H. Guston and Daniel Sarewitz. "Real-time Technology Assessment." Technology in Society 24.1 (2002): 93-109 17. Jennifer Kuzma et al. "An Integrated Approach to Oversight Assessment for Emerging Technologies." Risk Analysis 28.5 (2008): 1197-1220. 18. Fritz Allhoff. Risk, "Precaution and Emerging Technologies." Studies in Ethics, Law and Technology 3.2 (2009): 1-27. Part 5: Regulation 19. Lyria Bennett Moses. "Why Have a Theory of Law and Technological Change?" Minn. J.L. Sci. & Tech 8.2 (2007): 589-606 20. Renn, Ortwin and Mihail C. Roco. "Nanotechnology and the Need for Risk Governance." Journal of Nanoparticle Research 8.2 (2006): 153-191 21. Gregory N. Mandel. "Regulating Emerging Technologies." Law, Innovation and Technology 1.1 (2009): 75-92. 22. Gurumurthy Ramachandran, et al. "Recommendations for Oversight of Nanobiotechnology: Dynamic Oversight for Complex and Convergent Technology." Journal of Nanoparticle Research 13.4 (2011): 1345-1371 23. Christopher Bosso. "The Enduring Embrace: The Regulatory Ancien Regime and Governance of Nanomaterials in the U.S." Nanotechnology Law & Business 9.4 (2013): 381-392 24. Wolf S.M., Jones C.M. Designing Oversight for Nanomedicine Research in Human Subjects: Systematic Analysis of Exceptional Oversight for Emerging Technologies. Journal of Nanoparticle Research. 2011-- 13(4):1449-65. Part 6: Coordination 25. Francis Fukuyama, . "Gene Regime." Foreign Policy 129 (2002): 57-63. 26. Mihail C. Roco. "Possibilities for Global Governance of Converging Technologies." Journal of Nanoparticle Research 10.1 (2008): 11-29 27. Diana M. Bowman and Graeme A. Hodge. "Counting on Codes: an Examination of Transnational Codes as a Regulatory Governance Mechnanism for Nanotechnologies." Regulation & Governance 3.2 (2009): 145-164. 28. Gary E. Marchant & Wendell Wallach. "Governing the Governance of Emerging Technologies", in Gary E. Marchant, Kenneth W. Abbott & Braden Allenby (eds), Innovative Governance Models for Emerging Technolgies, (2013) 136-152.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472428448 20170123
Emerging technologies present a challenging but fascinating set of ethical, legal and regulatory issues. The articles selected for this volume provide a broad overview of the most influential historical and current thinking in this area and show that existing frameworks are often inadequate to address new technologies - such as biotechnology, nanotechnology, synthetic biology and robotics - and innovative new models are needed. This collection brings together invaluable, innovative and often complementary approaches for overcoming the unique challenges of emerging technology ethics and governance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472428448 20170123
Law Library (Crown)
Book
volumes ; 25 cm
  • v. 1. Introduction: The new Lex mercatoria and its sources
  • v. 2. ontract and movable property law
  • v. 3. Financial products, financial services and financial regulation.
This is the fifth edition of the leading work on transnational and comparative commercial and financial law, covering a wide range of complex topics in the modern law of international commerce, finance and trade. As a guide for students and practitioners it has proven to be unrivalled. Since the fourth edition, the work is now divided into three volumes, each of which can be used independently or as part of the complete work. Volume one covers the roots and foundations of private law; the different orientations and structure of civil and common law; the concept, forces, and theoretical basis of the transnationalisation of the law in the professional sphere; the autonomous sources of the new law merchant or modern lex mercatoria, its largely finance-driven impulses; and its relationship to domestic public policy and public order requirements. Volume two deals with transnational contract, movable and intangible property law. Volume three deals with financial products and financial services, with the structure and operation of modern commercial and investment banks, and with financial risk, stability and regulation, including the fall-out from the recent financial crisis and regulatory responses in the US and Europe. All three volumes may be purchased separately or as a single set. From the reviews of previous editions: "...synthesizes and integrates diverse bodies of law into a coherent and accessible account...remarkable in its scope and depth. It stands alone in its field not only due to its comprehensive coverage, but also its original methodology. Although it appears to be a weighty tome, in fact, in light of its scope, it is very concise. While providing a wealth of intensely practical information, its heart is highly conceptual and very ambitious...likely to become a classic text in its field." American Journal of Comparative Law "Dalhuisen's style is relaxed...what he writes convinces without the need for an excess of references to sources...a highly valuable contribution to the legal literature. It adopts a useful, modern approach to teaching the young generation of lawyers how to deal with the increasing internationalisation of law. It is also helpful to the practising lawyer and to legislators." Uniform Law Review/Revue de Droit Uniforme "this is a big book, with big themes and an author with the necessary experience to back them up...Full of insights as to the theories that underlie the rules governing contract, property and security, it is an important contribution to the law of international commerce and finance." Law Quarterly Review "...presents a very different case: that of a civilized and cultivated cosmopolitan legal scholar, with a keen sense of international commercial and financial practice, with an in-depth grounding in both comparative legal history and comparative law, combined with the ability to transcend conventional English black-letter law description with critical judgment towards institutional wisdom and intellectual fashions...a wide-ranging, historically and comparatively very deep and comprehensive commentary, but which is also very contemporary and forward-looking on many or most of the issues relevant in modern transnational commercial, contract and financial transactions. .." International and Comparative Law Quarterly.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781849464529 20160611
Law Library (Crown)

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