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Book
30 p. ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 276 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
161 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Green Library
Book
xiv, 193 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface and Acknowledgements List of Acronyms Chapter 1. The Problem of Local Ownership of Peacebuilding Chapter 2. The Changing Practice of International Peacebuilding Chapter 3. The Historical and Social Impetus for Local Ownership in Afghanistan Chapter 4. The Dilemmas of Foreign Ownership Chapter 5. The Dilemmas of Afghan Ownership Chapter 6. Conflict Transformation and 'Ownership' Dilemmas: A Systems Approach Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739181560 20160612
The international community has followed up its 2001 invasion of Afghanistan with a complex, multi-faceted peacebuilding project. However, informed observers believe that this Western-led mission in Afghanistan has failed to address the inherent peacebuilding needs of Afghanistan and has hindered the formation of a locally experienced sustainable peace. In response, emerging peacebuilding theories and rhetoric have pointed to an urgent need for revised peacebuilding paradigms and strategies that hold local, Afghan ownership of peacebuilding activities as a central concern. This book responds to this need for revised peacebuilding paradigms and: (1) introduces the topic of local ownership of peacebuilding in Afghanistan; (2) surveys current shifts in peacebuilding theory and practice that are only starting to be realized on the ground; (3) sets the context for a discussion of local ownership of peacebuilding; (4) reports on the perceptions of foreign and Afghan peacebuilding leaders working in Afghanistan in regards to the journey towards local ownership of peacebuilding; and (5) suggests the creation of a locally designed and led conflict transformation system that might help restructure local-foreign relations and advance the journey towards Afghan ownership of peacebuilding.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739181560 20160612
Green Library
Book
vi, 258 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction Chapter 1. The United Nations * The Legacy of Dag Hammarskjold * A Girl Born Today in Afghanistan * Unhealable Wounds: The Colleagues We Lost in Iraq * Pushing Rocks to the Top of the Mountain * Five Lessons Chapter 2. Development and the Global Community * The Emerging Power of Civil Society * A Global Compact with Business * Peace and Development * Global Market, Global Values * We the Peoples * Leadership is Coming from Women * Climate Change-An All-Encompassing Threat Chapter 3. Peace and Security * Preventing Deadly Conflict * The Use of Force * Cool and Reasoned Judgement * The Importance of Multilateralism * A Fork in the Road * Democracy, Terrorism, and Security * Non-Proliferation and Disarmament-Two Sides of a Coin Chapter 4. Human Rights * Against Racism * "The Very Heart of the UN's Mission" * "The Battle Is Never Finally Won" Chapter 5. Peacekeeping and Peaccebuilding * Swords into Ploughshares: The 50th Anniversary of UN Peacekeeping * What We Have Learnt Chapter 6. Africa * Africa's Third Wave * AIDS and Africa's Future * From OAU to African Union * An Exciting Time to Be an African Chapter 7. The Middle East * Israel and the United Nations * Following Sadat's Example * The Tragedy of Lebanon * Not Just a Regional Conflict Chapter 8. Prevention of Genocide and the Responsibility to Protect * The International Criminal Court * On Intervention * An Emerging Norm * Two Concepts of Sovereignty * An Action Plan to Prevent Genocide * Remembering the Holocaust Chapter 9. The Value of Diversity * A Dialogue among and within Societies * Unity in Diversity * "The Faith We Must Have in Each Other" * "Naming Evil" * "A Small Confession".
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781612055589 20160614
During his momentous time as Secretary-General of the UN, Kofi Annan played a decisive role in launching the Millennium Development Goals, establishing the International Criminal Court, and articulating the Responsibility to Protect as a guiding principle for international action. In 2001 - just after 9/11 - he and the UN jointly received the Nobel Peace Prize, 'for their work for a better organized and more peaceful world.' These and other crucial events - including the crises over Kosovo and East Timor, and the war in Iraq - are encapsulated in this book of Kofi Annan's key speeches from throughout his term of office. The selection gives a broad view of Annan's most pressing concerns, and the eloquence with which he addressed them. Covering subjects from development, health, and climate change to the prevention of genocide and the ideal of diversity, these statements show how deeply involved the UN was in the most important issues of the era. We the Peoples is a timely and much-needed reminder of Annan's ideas and priorities; his words on war, peace, humanity, and 'man's inhumanity to man' still resonate today. This book will offer many pointers for maintaining and developing the UN as a vital instrument for humanity in the coming decades.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781612055589 20160614
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 258 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • The United Nations
  • Development and the global community
  • Peace and security
  • Human rights
  • Peacekeeping and peace-building
  • Africa
  • The Middle East
  • Prevention of genocide and the responsibility to protect
  • The value of diversity.
During his momentous time as Secretary-General of the UN, Kofi Annan played a decisive role in launching the Millennium Development Goals, establishing the International Criminal Court, and articulating the Responsibility to Protect as a guiding principle for international action. In 2001 - just after 9/11 - he and the UN jointly received the Nobel Peace Prize, 'for their work for a better organized and more peaceful world.' These and other crucial events - including the crises over Kosovo and East Timor, and the war in Iraq - are encapsulated in this book of Kofi Annan's key speeches from throughout his term of office. The selection gives a broad view of Annan's most pressing concerns, and the eloquence with which he addressed them. Covering subjects from development, health, and climate change to the prevention of genocide and the ideal of diversity, these statements show how deeply involved the UN was in the most important issues of the era. We the Peoples is a timely and much-needed reminder of Annan's ideas and priorities; his words on war, peace, humanity, and 'man's inhumanity to man' still resonate today. This book will offer many pointers for maintaining and developing the UN as a vital instrument for humanity in the coming decades.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781612055589 20160614
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 148 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Preface. 1. Amaratya Sen and Sustainability "Timothy W. Luke" 2. Rawlsian Justice in a Common Globe "Aaron James "3. Deliberative Communication for Sustainability? A Habermas-Inspired Pluralistic Approach "Tomas Englund, Johan A-hman and Leif A-stman" 4. Dworkin and the Appeal of Theory "Stephen Guest "5. Nozick on Security and Sustainability "Christopher Winch" 6. Hayekian Liberalism and Sustainable Development "Mark Pennington" 7. Engaging Tradition: Michael Oakeshott on Liberal Learning "Hanan Alexander" 8. Liberalism, Sustainability, Security, Learning: Framing the Issues "Stephen Gough and Andrew Stables. "Contributors. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415955829 20160527
Much of the world will be living in broadly 'liberal' societies for the foreseeable future. Sustainability and security, however defined, must therefore be considered in the context of such societies, yet there is very little significant literature that does so. Indeed, much ecologically-oriented literature is overtly anti-liberal, as have been some recent responses to security concerns. This book explores the implications for sustainability and security of a range of intellectual perspectives on liberalism, such as those offered by John Rawls, Robert Nozick, Frederick Hayek, Ronald Dworkin, Michael Oakeshott, Amartya Sen and Jurgen Habermas.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415955829 20160527
Green Library
Book
219 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
xv, 186 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
  • Acknowledgements-- Opening Note-- Clarity-- 1. The Straightjacket: peeling away the layers-- elections plus a market... that's democracy?-- lizzie's lessons-- thin democracy's pitfalls-- deeper dangers-- humility and hope-- 2. New Eyes: goodness of or in human nature?-- an ecology of democracy, five qualities-- a premise of plenty, a spiral of hope-- 3. What Democracy Feels Like: nine dimensions, some glimpses-- why now? four revolutions-- Creativity-- 4. Power Invisible: one choice we don't have-- mirrors in our brain-- power isn't a four-letter word-- relational power's under-appreciated sources-- drops count-- 5. The Art Of Power: democracy's arts-- the power of simply listening-- conflict as creative-- kids learn conflict is okay-- 6. Talking Democracy: globalization or global corporate power?-- free market-free trade or fair market-fair trade?-- regulations or standards?-- consumers or buyers?-- Courage-- 7. Seize the Moment: a downward spin-- a rude shock-- 8. When Fear Means Go: fear as pure energy-- fear and conflict-- as it is-- old thoughts, new thoughts-- inner applause-- 9. Sanity in Motion: claiming our sanity-- protection-- a cautionary tale, the dangers of good intentions-- on issues versus entry points-- an internal checklist-- bold humility-- knowing-- An Invitation-- Questions to Spark Talk and Action-- Recommended Reading-- Endnotes-- Index-- Books from the Small Planet Institute-- Ideas-- Idea 1: Thin Democracy vs. Living Democracy-- Idea 2: We All Have Public Lives-- Idea 3: Rethinking Power-- Idea 4: Ten Arts of Democracy-- Idea 5: Toward a Language of Democracy-- Idea 6: The Inner World of Living Democracy-- Idea 7: Seven Ways to Rethink Fear-- Idea 8: Living Democracy's Checklist.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780979414244 20160528
"Getting a Grip: Clarity, Creativity & Courage in a World Gone Mad" is a little book with a big message. Frances Moore Lappe - author of fifteen books, including three-million copy bestseller "Diet for a Small Planet" - distills her world-spanning experience and wisdom in a conversational yet hard-hitting style. She affirms readers' basic sanity - their intuitive knowledge that it is possible to stop grasping at straws and grasp the real roots of today's crises, from hunger and poverty to climate change and terrorism. Because we are creatures of the mind, says Lappe, it is the power of 'frame' - our core assumptions about how the world works - that determines outcomes.She pinpoints the dominant failing frame now driving our planet toward disaster. By interweaving fresh insights, startling facts, and stirring vignettes of ordinary people pursuing creative solutions to our most pressing global problems, Lappe uncovers a new, empowering 'frame' through which real solutions are emerging worldwide. She writes: 'My book's intent is to enable us to see what is happening all around us but is still invisible to most of us. It is about people in all walks of life who are penetrating the spiral of despair and reversing it with new ideas, ingenious innovation - and courage'.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780979414244 20160528
Green Library
Book
381 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xv, 222 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Tables-- Abbreviations-- Foreword-- Preface-- Acknowledgements-- 1. Introduction-- 2. Autocracy and Dissent in Colonial Congo-- 3. Cold War and Personal Rule-- 4. The Rise and Fall of the Sacred Union-- 5. The 1996-97 Rebellion and Mobutu's Fall from Power-- 6. The Anti-Kabila Revolt and Its Consequences-- 7. Summary and Conclusions-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773460348 20160527
This work traces the remote origins of Congo's current national predicament and the people's protracted quest for democracy and social justice. The first part of the book provides an account of the political history of modern Congo which sets the context for the second part, an in-depth discussion of the interplay of internal and external forces in Congo and their impact on the politics of democratic transition in the country from 1990 through early 2000s. Arguing that recent popular resistance against political dictatorship in Congo builds on a longstanding tradition, the author offers critical analysis of post-Cold War configuration of pro-democracy forces (or the appearance thereof) inside the country and at the global level, which compelled President Mobutu to inaugurate political reform in April 1990. Against this backdrop, the author assesses the roles played by the Sovereign National Conference (SNC), the transitional institutions established by the SNC, and the Sacred Union of opposition, all of which emerged during the early 1990s in response to the government's decision to lift the ban on partisan political activity. The book concludes with cautious optimism about the prospects for democracy and sustainable economic development in the post-Mobutu Congo and an overview of some of the practical steps that must be taken by the Congolese people and the global community in order to realize these objectives.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773460348 20160527
Green Library
Book
191 p.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
76, 12 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
227 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Acknowledgements-- Introduction-- 1. Towards Post-Cosmopolitanism-- 2. Three Types of Citizenship-- 3. Ecological Citizenship-- 4. Environmental Sustainability in Liberal Societies-- 5. Citizenship, Education, and the Environment-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199258437 20160527
This is the first book-length treatment of the relationship between citizenship and the environment. Andrew Dobson argues that ecological citizenship cannot be fully articulated in terms of the two great traditions of citizenship - liberal and civic republican - which have been bequeathed to us. He develops an original theory of citizenship, which he calls 'post-cosmopolitan', and argues that ecological citizenship is an example and an inflection of it. Ecological citizenship focuses on duties as well as rights, and these duties are owed, non-reciprocally, by those individuals and communities who occupy unsustainable amounts of ecological space, to those who occupy too little. The first virtue of ecological citizenship is justice, but post-cosmopolitanism follows some feminisms in arguing that care and compassion may be required to meet its special obligations. Dobson suggests that ecological citizenship's conception of political space is not the state or the municipality, or the ideal speech community of cosmopolitanism, but the 'ecological footprint'.Most governments around the world have signed up to sustainable development, and they cannot afford to ignore ecological citizenship as a means of getting there. Government policies usually revolve around financial sticks and carrots, but these leave people uncommitted to the idea of sustainability and only to the rewards that are attached to it. Dobson contrasts citizenship with fiscal incentives as a way of encouraging people to act more sustainably, in the belief that the former is more compatible with the long-term and deeper shifts of attitude and behaviour that sustainability requires. Both citizenship and sustainability, though, are often viewed with suspicion in liberal societies because they refuse to accept the inviolability of individual preferences. Dobson therefore offers an original account of the relationship between liberalism and sustainability, arguing that the former's commitment to a plurality of conceptions of the good entails a commitment to so-called 'strong' forms of the latter. How to make an ecological citizen?Dobson examines the potential of formal high school citizenship education programmes through a case study of the recent implementation of the compulsory citizenship curriculum in the UK. He concludes that the Department of Education and Skills has constructed a Trojan horse capable of kick-starting ecological citizenship, if teachers are willing and able to travel in it. This book will be of interest to those working in the fields of environmental political theory, citizenship, globalisation, cosmopolitanism, liberalism, and citizenship education.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199258437 20160527
Andrew Dobson argues that ecological citizenship cannot be fully articulated in terms of the two great traditions of citizenship - liberal and civic republican - with which we have been bequeathed. He develops an original theory of citizenship, which he calls "post-cosmopolitan", and argues that ecological citizenship is an example and an inflection of it. Ecological citizenship focuses on duties as well as rights, and these duties are owed non-reciprocally, by those individuals and communities who occupy unsustainable amounts of ecological space, to those who occupy too little. The first virtue of ecological citizenship is justice, but post-cosmopolitanism follows some feminisms in arguing that care and compassion may be required to meet its special obligations. Dobson suggests that ecological citizenship's conception of political space is not the state or the municipality, or the ideal speech community of cosmopolitanism, but the "ecological footprint".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199258444 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
79 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
176 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
  • Vorwort [von Anne Rüffer]
  • Überblick
  • Der Ist-Zustand der globalen Zusammenarbeit
  • Soll-Zustand
  • Mittelverwendung : Welche Ziele bringt das Weltkonto konkret voran?
  • Mittelverwaltung : Welche Art von Weltkonto kann in kurzer Zeit tatsächlich funktionieren?
  • Mittelherkunft : wie finanziert sich das Weltkonto?
  • Dank
  • Umfrage
  • Anhang
  • Anmerkungen
  • Bildnachweis.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 315 pages ; 24 cm
Global power structures are changing. The United States and Europe are losing ground, as countries such as China and India increase their global reach. At the same time that new global players emerge, multinational corporations, global civil society organizations, and international media carve out their own spaces in international affairs. How will these changes impact the legitimacy of the United Nations? In Shared Responsibility, Carsten Staur examines the ability of the UN to combine its normative functions - defining global objectives, rules, and standards - with practical assistance for its 193 member states. Staur focuses on transformative global challenges, where the UN has the potential to play a critical role in assisting vulnerable countries in the aftermath of conflict, in further developing the concept of "responsibility to protect, " in creating a more forceful system of accountability for mass atrocity crimes, and in re-launching sustainable development as the future's principal global development approach and as the basis for dealing effectively with both climate change and the responsible management of global resources. An insider's look at the UN, Shared Responsibility details the problems faced by the United Nations and presents solutions for the organization to remain relevant, legitimate, and action-oriented in the twenty-first century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773542945 20160612
Green Library
Book
74 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)