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Book
xii, 282 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Civil society and the social construction of citizenship
  • Controlled inclusion and the elusive goal of citizenship as agency
  • Dictatorship or democracy : the rise of neopluralism and citizenship as consumption
  • Testing the limits of citizenship : Chile's democratic transition
  • The failure of citizenship : Bolivia's popular participation law
  • The promise of citizenship : civil society and Mexico's transition to democracy
  • Latin America's democratic crossroads : the challenge of making civil society relevant.
"Devoting particular emphasis to Bolivia, Chile, and Mexico, proposes a theory of civil society to explain the economic and political challenges for continuing democratization in Latin America"--Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
vii, 199 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 269 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
286 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
423 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxii, 349 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
51 pages.
Green Library
Book
118 pages
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
30 pages ; 28 cm.
  • Executive summary
  • Introduction
  • Bank strategy in support of subnational development
  • Strategy implementation
  • Coordination with other development institutions
  • Corporate impacts.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
238 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
xviii, 413 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: the third wave of democratization in Latin America Scott Mainwaring and Frances Hagopian-- 1. Latin American democratization since 1978: democratic transitions, breakdowns, and erosions Scott Mainwaring and Anibal Perez-Linan-- Part I. Three Democratic Giants with Authoritarian Pasts: Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico: 2. Argentina: democratic survival amidst economic failure Steven Levitsky-- 3. The growing sustainability of Brazil's low-quality democracy Kurt Weyland-- 4. The demise of Mexico's one-party dominant regime: elite choices and the masses in the establishment of democracy Beatriz Magaloni-- Part II. Unexpected Democracies in Unlikely Countries: Bolivia, El Salvador, and Guatemala: 5. Bolivia's democracy at the crossroads Rene Antonio Mayorga-- 6. Challenges to political democracy in El Salvador Elisabeth Jean Wood-- 7. Democracy on ice: the multiple challenges of Guatemala's peace process Mitchell A. Seligson-- Part III. Democratic Erosion in The Third Wave: Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela: 8. From 'restricted' to 'besieged': the changing nature of the limits to democracy in Colombia Ana Maria Bejarano and Eduardo Pizarro-- 9. Peru 1980-2000: chronicle of a death foretold? determinism, political decisions, and open outcomes Martin Tanaka-- 10. Explaining democratic deterioration in Venezuela through nested inference Michael Coppedge-- Part IV. Conclusions: 11. Conclusions: Government performance, political representation, and public perceptions of contemporary democracy in Latin America Frances Hagopian.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521824613 20160528
The late twentieth century witnessed the birth of an impressive number of new democracies in Latin America. This wave of democratization since 1978 has been by far the broadest and most durable in the history of Latin America, but many of the resulting democratic regimes also suffer from profound deficiencies. What caused democratic regimes to emerge and survive? What are their main achievements and shortcomings? This volume offers an ambitious and comprehensive overview of the unprecedented advances as well as the setbacks in the post-1978 wave of democratization. It seeks to explain the sea change from a region dominated by authoritarian regimes to one in which openly authoritarian regimes are the rare exception, and it analyzes why some countries have achieved striking gains in democratization while others have experienced erosions. The book presents general theoretical arguments about what causes and sustains democracy and analyses of nine compelling country cases.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521824613 20160528
Green Library
Book
xv, 216 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. The performance of leftist governments in Latin America: conceptual and theoretical issues Kurt Weyland-- 2. The repeating revolution: Chavez's new politics and old economics Javier Corrales-- 3. The challenge of progressive change under Evo Morales George Gray Molina-- 4. The Chilean left in power: achievements, failures, and omissions Evelyne Huber, Jennifer Pribble and John D. Stephens-- 5. From Cardoso to Lula: the triumph of pragmatism in Brazil Peter R. Kingstone and Aldo F. Ponce-- 6. Lula's administration at a crossroads: the difficult combination of stability and development in Brazil Pedro Luiz Barros Silva, Jose Carlos de Souza Braga and Vera Lucia Cabral Costa-- 7. The policies and performance of the contestatory and moderate left Raul Madrid, Wendy Hunter and Kurt Weyland.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521762205 20160604
Can Latin America's 'new left' stimulate economic development, enhance social equity, and deepen democracy in spite of the economic and political constraints it faces? This is the first book to systematically examine the policies and performance of the left-wing governments that have risen to power in Latin America during the last decade. Featuring thorough studies of Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Venezuela by renowned experts, the volume argues that moderate leftist governments have attained greater, more sustainable success than their more radical, contestatory counterparts. Moderate governments in Brazil and Chile have generated solid economic growth, reduced poverty and inequality, and created innovative and fiscally sound social programs, while respecting the fundamental principles of market economics and liberal democracy. By contrast, more radical governments, exemplified by Hugo Chavez in Venezuela, have expanded state intervention and popular participation and attained some short-term economic and social successes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521762205 20160604
Green Library
Book
373 p.
This text provides a fieldwork-based study of the role of popular organisations among the Chilean urban poor in sustaining political life during authoritarian regimes and re-establishing democracy afterwards.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780271014357 20160527
Green Library
Book
viii, 237 p. ; 29 cm.
Latin American, Caribbean and North American women discuss their hard-earned lessons in this volume on grass roots democracy. To sustain grass roots initiatives, they stress, civic organizations must learn how to broaden their financial support.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781560006855 20160528
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 238 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Dis/integrating Mexico - Legal Sovereignty and the Political Economy of Early Statehood-- Beyond Legal Sovereignty - the Revolutionary Myth of a Strong National State-- Sustaining the Myth of Sovereignty as State Strength-- The State Sovereignty Myth Shattered-- Struggling with State Weakness - State Sovereignty as Technocratic Efficiency in Government-- Dis/integrating Mexico - the Quest for "Economic Sovereignty" and NAFTA.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781555874186 20160528
Exploring the contradictory nature of Mexican statehood, Erfani explains how a weak national state became a symbol of great domestic strength and, although failing in its domestic economic endeavours, supported a long and stable political regime. Erfani focuses on the concept of sovereignty as not only a legal status, but also a political myth. She traces the struggles of Mexico's federal governments from 1940 through the 1970s to sustain a myth equating legal sovereignty with state strength vis-a-vis the world economy. She then addresses the demise of that myth and the ensuing shift in the 1980s toward the symbolism and rhetoric of a strong private economy. In the 1990s, proponents of NAFTA - seeking to dismantle Mexico's legal basis for state intervention in the domestic economy - claim to be replacing the failed legal-political sovereignty of the state with the economic sovereignty of the private sector. This rhetoric of economic strength, concludes Erfani, holds as much potential for fragmenting, as it does for unifying, the national political-economic order.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781555874186 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
238 p.
  • Dis/integrating Mexico - Legal Sovereignty and the Political Economy of Early Statehood-- Beyond Legal Sovereignty - the Revolutionary Myth of a Strong National State-- Sustaining the Myth of Sovereignty as State Strength-- The State Sovereignty Myth Shattered-- Struggling with State Weakness - State Sovereignty as Technocratic Efficiency in Government-- Dis/integrating Mexico - the Quest for "Economic Sovereignty" and NAFTA.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781555874186 20160528
Exploring the contradictory nature of Mexican statehood, Erfani explains how a weak national state became a symbol of great domestic strength and, although failing in its domestic economic endeavours, supported a long and stable political regime. Erfani focuses on the concept of sovereignty as not only a legal status, but also a political myth. She traces the struggles of Mexico's federal governments from 1940 through the 1970s to sustain a myth equating legal sovereignty with state strength vis-a-vis the world economy. She then addresses the demise of that myth and the ensuing shift in the 1980s toward the symbolism and rhetoric of a strong private economy. In the 1990s, proponents of NAFTA - seeking to dismantle Mexico's legal basis for state intervention in the domestic economy - claim to be replacing the failed legal-political sovereignty of the state with the economic sovereignty of the private sector. This rhetoric of economic strength, concludes Erfani, holds as much potential for fragmenting, as it does for unifying, the national political-economic order.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781555874186 20160528
Green Library
Book
xiii, 594 p. : maps ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction: politics, society, and democracy in Latin America / Larry Diamond, Jonathan Hartlyn, and Juan J. Linz
  • Argentina: capitalism and democracy / Carlos H. Waisman
  • Brazil: inequality against democracy / Bolívar Lamounier
  • Chile: origins and consolidation of a Latin American democracy / Arturo Valenzuela
  • Colombia: the politics of violence and democratic transformation / Jonathan Hartlyn and John Dugas
  • Peru: precarious regimes, authoritarian and democratic / Cynthia McClintock
  • Venezuela: the character, crisis, and possible future of democracy / Daniel H. Levine and Brian F. Crisp
  • Costa Rica: the roots of democratic stability / John A. Booth
  • The Dominican Republic: the long and difficult struggle for democracy / Rosario Espinal and Jonathan Hartlyn
  • Mexico: sustained civilian rule and the questions of democracy / Daniel C. Levy and Kathleen Bruhn.
This text reflects improvements in democratic trends and the erosion of democratic advances in different countries. It regards political actors and institutions, and is concerned about the impact on democratic consolidation of economic constraints, weak states, judicial inefficacy and inequality.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781555877989 20160528
Green Library
Book
viii, 208 p. ; 23 cm.
As if by unseen signal, toward the end of the 1980s scores of state governments in Latin America suddenly transferred money and decision-making power to local municipalities. At the same time, they allowed local governments to choose their leaders - mayors and council members - in free and open elections. The resulting revolution has been profound in its reach and stunning in the silent shift of power from central to local authorities. Tim Campbell traces the growth and effects of decentralization and democratization in Latin America throughout the 1980s and 1990s. He argues that these reforms, which are vital to long-term sustainable growth in the region, are in danger of being smothered by current policy responses of national and international institutions. His research, conducted over a ten-year span, counters conventional wisdom about the role of development banks in the process of state reform and offers timely insights into similar events now taking place in other parts of the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822957966 20160528
Green Library
Book
xiii, 290 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Chavismo, populism, and democracy-- 3. Measuring the populist discourse of Chavismo-- 4. Party system breakdown and the rise of Chavismo-- 5. The causes of populism in comparative perspective-- 6. Populist organization: the Bolivarian circles in Venezuela-- 7. Populist policy: the missions of the Chavez government-- 8. Conclusion-- Appendix A: the populist speech rubric-- Appendix B: test of the sampling technique-- Appendix C: test of interaction effects.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521765039 20160604
Populism is best understood as a Manichaean world view linked to a characteristic language or discourse. Chavismo, the movement that sustains Hugo Chavez in Venezuela, is a paradigmatic instance of populism. Using a novel, cross-country dataset on populist discourse, combined with extensive data from within Venezuela and across other countries, this book demonstrates that populist movements can be understood as responses to widespread corruption and economic crisis. The book analyzes the Bolivarian Circles and government missions in Venezuela, revealing how populist ideas influence political organization and policy. The analysis provides important insight into the nature of populism, including its causes and consequences, and addresses broader questions about the role of ideas in politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521765039 20160604
Green Library
Book
xiii, 269 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Political parties and their resources-- 3. Explaining the fates of parties-- 4. The resource wealth of parties after party-system collapse: the empirical record in the Andes-- 5. Survival and revival in an atomized party system: Peru after 1992-- 6. Survival and revival in a regionalized party system: Venezuela after 1998-- 7. The difficulties of survival and revival in a hyper-fluid party system: Bolivia after 2005-- 8. Conclusion: resources and the fates of parties.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107189799 20170814
Political parties in the developing world often face serious electoral crises; from one election to the next, parties can be decisively voted out of national office. What happens to a party that experiences this kind of voter rejection? The literature suggests it will disappear, leaving the party system vulnerable to the inexperience of new political actors. The Fates of Political Parties offers a more nuanced perspective: focusing on a number of individual Latin American countries as well as the region as a whole, it identifies considerable variation regarding how parties survive and even revive after an electoral crisis. The book revitalizes the study of parties as complex entities that rely on a potentially diverse set of resources to remain active in politics. It demonstrates that parties can be remarkably enduring institutions; surviving and reviving parties represent instances of institutional stability. Where they endure, those parties can sustain competition and strengthen the democratic regime.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107189799 20170814
Green Library

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