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Book
792 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Green Library
Book
xiv, 253 pages ; 24 cm
  • Unholy human beings and holy humanity in Kant's critical and practical philosophy
  • Independence from nature : preparing the ground for perpetual peace in the third critique
  • The problem of international politics : human beings within the mechanism of nature
  • The instruction of suffering : Kant's theological anthropology for a prodigal species
  • An "all-unifying church triumphant!"
  • Conclusion : believing in the possibility of salvation
  • Epilogue : Kant and contemporary cosmopolitanism.
Green Library
Book
xv, 174 pages ; 23 cm
  • Reminiscences
  • Robert Nisbet : conservative sociologist
  • Defining right and left
  • The problem of historical connections
  • Liberal democracy as a God term
  • Origins of the state
  • Reexamining the conservative legacy
  • Whig history revisited
  • The European Union election, 2014
  • The English Constitution reconsidered
  • Redefining classes
  • Did Mussolini have a Pope?
  • Heidegger and Strauss : a comparative study
  • Explaining Trump.
Paul Gottfried's critical engagement with political correctness is well known. The essays in Revisions and Dissents focus on a range of topics in European intellectual and political history, social theory, and the history of modern political movements. With subjects as varied as Robert Nisbet, Whig history, the European Union election of 2014, and Donald Trump, the essays are tied together by their strenuous confrontation with historians and journalists whose claims about the past no longer receive critical scrutiny. According to Gottfried, successful writers on historical topics take advantage of political orthodoxy and/or widespread ignorance to present questionable platitudes as self-evident historical judgments. New research ceases to be of importance in determining accepted interpretations. What remains decisive, Gottfried maintains, is whether the favored view fits the political and emotional needs of what he calls "verbalizing elites." In this highly politicized age, Gottfried argues, it is necessary to re-examine these prevalent interpretations of the past. He does so in this engaging volume, which will appeal to general readers interested in political and intellectual history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780875807621 20170522
Green Library
Book
xii, 243 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Norm setting in international law and human rights
  • The process of standing setting in human rights
  • The multiplication of actors
  • The role of NGOs in the creation of norms
  • The question of deficits
  • New and emerging standards
  • A normative critique of human rights.
Green Library
Book
xii, 248 pages ; 25 cm
  • The think tank in an era of liberal consensus
  • Think tanks in a marketplace of ideas
  • Think tanks in the age of Reagan
  • Think tanks, new democrats, and committed conservatives
  • Think tanks, foreign policy, and the marketplace of ideas in the 2000s
  • Conclusion: policy as identity politics.
From the middle of the twentieth century, think tanks have played an indelible role in the rise of American conservatism. Positioning themselves against the alleged liberal bias of the media, academia, and the federal bureaucracy, conservative think tanks gained the attention of politicians and the public alike and were instrumental in promulgating conservative ideas. Yet, in spite of the formative influence these insitutions have had on the media and public opinion, little has been written about their history. Here, Jason Stahl offers the first sustained investigation of the rise and historical development of the conservative think tank as a source of political and cultural power in the United States. What we now know as conservative think tanks-research and public-relations institutions populated by conservative intellectuals-emerged in the postwar period as places for theorizing and "selling" public policies and ideologies to both lawmakers and the public at large. Stahl traces the progression of think tanks from their outsider status against a backdrop of New Deal and Great Society liberalism to their current prominence as a counterweight to progressive political institutions and thought. By examining the rise of the conservative think tank, Stahl makes invaluable contributions to our historical understanding of conservatism, public-policy formation, and capitalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469627861 20160619
Green Library
Book
x, 366 pages ; 25 cm
The American conservative movement as we know it faces an existential crisis as the nation's demographics shift away from its core constituents-older white middle-class Christians. It is the Americanconservatism that we don't know that concerns George Hawley in this book. During its ascendancy, leaders within the conservative establishment have energetically policed the movement's boundaries, effectively keeping alternative versions of conservatism out of view. Returning those neglected voices to the story, Right-Wing Critics of American Conservatism offers a more complete, complex, and nuanced account of the American right in all its dissonance in history and in our day. The right-wing intellectual movements considered here differ both from mainstream conservatism and from each other when it comes to fundamental premises, such as the value of equality, the proper roleof the state, the importance of free markets, the place of religion in politics, and attitudes toward race. In clear and dispassionate terms, Hawley examines localists who exhibit equal skepticism toward big business and big government, paleoconservatives who look to the distant past for guidance and wish to turn back the clock, radical libertarians who are not content to be junior partners in the conservative movement, and various strains of white supremacy and theradical right in America. In the Internet age, where access is no longer determined by the select few, the independent right has far greater opportunitiesto make its many voices heard. This timely work puts those voices into context and historical perspective, clarifying our understanding of the American right-past, present, and future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780700621934 20160619
Green Library
Book
61 pages ; 20 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
63 pages ; 20 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxvi, 215 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
63 pages ; 20 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
57 pages ; 20 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 128 pages ; 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 322 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Introduction : the rhetorical lives of Cold War maps
  • Iron albatross : air-age globalism and the bird's-eye view of American internationalism
  • One world or two? : mapping a new foreign policy in the transition to Cold War
  • Images of commitment and evidentiary weapons : maps and the visual construction of the Soviet Union
  • Framing the Third World : American visions of "the South" and the cartography of development
  • The end of cartography : state control and radical change in the nuclear geopolitics of the second Cold War
  • Conclusion : from globalism to globalization: the afterlives of Cold War maps.
In this fascinating history of Cold War cartography, Timothy Barney considers maps as central to the articulation of ideological tensions between American national interests and international aspirations. Barney argues that the borders, scales, projections, and other conventions of maps prescribed and constrained the means by which foreign policy elites, popular audiences, and social activists navigated conflicts between North and South, East and West. Maps also influenced how identities were formed in a world both shrunk by advancing technologies and marked by expanding and shifting geopolitical alliances and fissures. Pointing to the necessity of how politics and values were "spatialized" in recent U.S. history, Barney argues that Cold War-era maps themselves had rhetorical lives that began with their conception and production and played out in their circulation within foreign policy circles and popular media. Reflecting on the ramifications of spatial power during the period, Mapping the Cold War ultimately demonstrates that even in the twenty-first century, American visions of the world - and the maps that account for them - are inescapably rooted in the anxieties of that earlier era.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469618548 20160618
Green Library
Book
viii, 194 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction : situating oakeshott
  • Language, practice, and individual agency
  • Individuality between tradition and contingency
  • Imagining the modern state
  • Towards a conversational democratic ethos
  • Conclusion : hearing voices.
Green Library
Book
51 pages ; 20 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
v, 77 pages : color portratis ; 29 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
iv, 128 pages : color illustrations, portraits ; 29 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 274 pages ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
100 pages : color illustrations ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxx, 324 pages : illustrations, map ; 26 cm.
Green Library