Book
xxv, 372 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction / Peter Willis
  • The business case for sustainability: opportunities and limits / Jonathon Hanks
  • Sustainability issues / James Bryce
  • The impact of sustainability issues on business / Jayne Mammatt
  • Responsible leadership and the changing social contract / Willem Fourie ... [et al.]
  • Perspectives on responsible investment / Corli le Roux
  • Broad-based black economic empowerment / Graham Terry
  • Sustainable development and the responsibility of government / Wessel Pretorius, Louis Heunis
  • Global initiatives to address sustainability / Peter Oldacre
  • How are companies doing? / Jennifer Orr
  • The importance of sustainability issues for small and medium sized businesses / Nicky van Hille
  • Financial reporting / Linda de Beer
  • Sustainability reporting / Graham Terry
  • Integrated reporting / Leigh Roberts
  • Insights into King III and the code for responsible investing in South Africa / Ansie Ramalho
  • The implications of assurance on sustainability reports / Kelly Gilman --Management accounting implications / Dewald Joubert, Jonathan Streng
  • Energy and carbon markets: the global energy dilemma and how carbon markets fit in / Rohitesh Dhawan, Marijke Vermaak
  • Using technology to enhance reporting / Gavin Marais
  • How to embed sustainability practices into an organisation / Nick Rockey
  • The future of sustainability / Nicola Robins.
Green Library
Book
xix, 311 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword ix Preface xiii Acknowledgments xvii Chapter 1: South Africa 1 The Uniqueness of South Africa 2 South Africa s Journey to Integrated Reporting 3 South African Assessment of the South African Experience 10 Our Reflections on the South African Experience 18 Notes 18 Chapter 2: Meaning 31 Company Experimentation: Examples from the First Integrated Reports 32 Expert Commentary: The First Reflections on Integrated Reporting 40 Codification: Creating Common Meaning 44 Notes 51 Chapter 3: Momentum 59 Adoption 61 Accelerators 63 Awareness 78 Notes 80 Chapter 4: Motives 97 Companies 98 Audience 102 Supporting Organizations and Initiatives 106 Regulators 107 Service Providers 109 Notes 111 Chapter 5: Materiality 119 The Social Construction of Materiality 120 Materiality in Environmental Reporting 122 Comparing Different Definitions of Materiality 123 Audience 127 Governance 129 Materiality for Integrated Reporting 132 Notes 134 Chapter 6: The Sustainable Value Matrix 147 A Short History of the Materiality Matrix 147 Issues with the Matrix 150 The Current State of Materiality Matrices 152 From the Materiality Matrix to the Sustainable Value Matrix 157 Notes 165 Appendix 6A: Comparing the Ford and Daimler Materiality Matrices 173 Notes 177 Appendix 6B: Methodology for the Materiality Matrices Review 179 Note 189 Chapter 7: Report Quality 191 The Six Capitals 192 Content Elements 194 Special Factors 200 Assurance 207 Notes 209 Appendix 7A: Methodology for Analyzing 124 Company Integrated Reports 221 Notes 223 Chapter 8: Reporting Websites 225 Methodology 226 Website Category Analysis 227 Website Feature Analysis 233 Three Examples 241 Notes 246 Appendix 8A: Methodology for Website Coding 253 Chapter 9: Information Technology 261 Integrated Reporting Processes 262 Four IT Trends 265 Contextual Reporting 269 (World Market Basket) 271 Notes 274 Chapter 10: Four Recommendations 281 A Very Brief History of Financial Reporting 282 Balancing Experimentation and Codification 283 Balancing Market and Regulatory Forces 285 Greater Advocacy from the Accounting Community 287 Achieving Clarity Regarding the Roles of Key Organizations 289 A Possible Scenario 290 Final Reflection 292 Notes 292 About the Authors 299 Index 301.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118646984 20160617
An in-depth, enlightening look at the integrated reporting movement The Integrated Reporting Movement explores the meaning of the concept, explains the forces that provide momentum to the associated movement, and examines the motives of the actors involved. The book posits integrated reporting as a key mechanism by which companies can ensure their own long-term sustainability by contributing to a sustainable society. Although integrated reporting has seen substantial development due to the support of companies, investors, and the initiatives of a number of NGOs, widespread regulatory intervention has yet to materialize. Outside of South Africa, adoption remains voluntary, accomplished via social movement abetted, to varying degrees, by market forces. In considering integrated reporting s current state of play, the authors provide guidance to ensure wider adoption of the practice and success of the movement, starting with how companies can improve their own reporting processes. But the support of investors, regulators, and NGOs is also important. All will benefit, as will society as a whole. Readers will learn how integrated reporting has evolved over the years, where frameworks and standards are today, and the practices that help ensure effective implementation including, but not limited to an extensive discussion of information technology s role in reporting and the importance of corporate reporting websites. The authors introduce the concepts of an annual board of directors Statement of Significant Audiences and Materiality and a Sustainable Value Matrix tool that translates the statement into management decisions. The book argues that the appropriate combination of market and regulatory forces to speed adoption will vary by country, concluding with four specific recommendations about what must be done to accelerate high quality adoption of integrated reporting around the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118646984 20160617
Business Library
Book
xix, 311 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Foreword ix Preface xiii Acknowledgments xvii Chapter 1: South Africa 1 The Uniqueness of South Africa 2 South Africa s Journey to Integrated Reporting 3 South African Assessment of the South African Experience 10 Our Reflections on the South African Experience 18 Notes 18 Chapter 2: Meaning 31 Company Experimentation: Examples from the First Integrated Reports 32 Expert Commentary: The First Reflections on Integrated Reporting 40 Codification: Creating Common Meaning 44 Notes 51 Chapter 3: Momentum 59 Adoption 61 Accelerators 63 Awareness 78 Notes 80 Chapter 4: Motives 97 Companies 98 Audience 102 Supporting Organizations and Initiatives 106 Regulators 107 Service Providers 109 Notes 111 Chapter 5: Materiality 119 The Social Construction of Materiality 120 Materiality in Environmental Reporting 122 Comparing Different Definitions of Materiality 123 Audience 127 Governance 129 Materiality for Integrated Reporting 132 Notes 134 Chapter 6: The Sustainable Value Matrix 147 A Short History of the Materiality Matrix 147 Issues with the Matrix 150 The Current State of Materiality Matrices 152 From the Materiality Matrix to the Sustainable Value Matrix 157 Notes 165 Appendix 6A: Comparing the Ford and Daimler Materiality Matrices 173 Notes 177 Appendix 6B: Methodology for the Materiality Matrices Review 179 Note 189 Chapter 7: Report Quality 191 The Six Capitals 192 Content Elements 194 Special Factors 200 Assurance 207 Notes 209 Appendix 7A: Methodology for Analyzing 124 Company Integrated Reports 221 Notes 223 Chapter 8: Reporting Websites 225 Methodology 226 Website Category Analysis 227 Website Feature Analysis 233 Three Examples 241 Notes 246 Appendix 8A: Methodology for Website Coding 253 Chapter 9: Information Technology 261 Integrated Reporting Processes 262 Four IT Trends 265 Contextual Reporting 269 (World Market Basket) 271 Notes 274 Chapter 10: Four Recommendations 281 A Very Brief History of Financial Reporting 282 Balancing Experimentation and Codification 283 Balancing Market and Regulatory Forces 285 Greater Advocacy from the Accounting Community 287 Achieving Clarity Regarding the Roles of Key Organizations 289 A Possible Scenario 290 Final Reflection 292 Notes 292 About the Authors 299 Index 301.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118646984 20160617
An in-depth, enlightening look at the integrated reporting movement The Integrated Reporting Movement explores the meaning of the concept, explains the forces that provide momentum to the associated movement, and examines the motives of the actors involved. The book posits integrated reporting as a key mechanism by which companies can ensure their own long-term sustainability by contributing to a sustainable society. Although integrated reporting has seen substantial development due to the support of companies, investors, and the initiatives of a number of NGOs, widespread regulatory intervention has yet to materialize. Outside of South Africa, adoption remains voluntary, accomplished via social movement abetted, to varying degrees, by market forces. In considering integrated reporting s current state of play, the authors provide guidance to ensure wider adoption of the practice and success of the movement, starting with how companies can improve their own reporting processes. But the support of investors, regulators, and NGOs is also important. All will benefit, as will society as a whole. Readers will learn how integrated reporting has evolved over the years, where frameworks and standards are today, and the practices that help ensure effective implementation including, but not limited to an extensive discussion of information technology s role in reporting and the importance of corporate reporting websites. The authors introduce the concepts of an annual board of directors Statement of Significant Audiences and Materiality and a Sustainable Value Matrix tool that translates the statement into management decisions. The book argues that the appropriate combination of market and regulatory forces to speed adoption will vary by country, concluding with four specific recommendations about what must be done to accelerate high quality adoption of integrated reporting around the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118646984 20160617
Green Library
Book
233 pages ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
188 p. : charts ; 23 cm.
  • A brief history of Brazil's growth
  • China towards 2020 : growth performance and sustainability
  • Shaping the Indian miracle : acceleration towards high growth
  • Indonesia beyond the recovery : growth strategy in an archipelago country
  • Sustainable growth in South Africa.
This publication is based on the proceedings of a conference, organized by the OECD, on the growth performance of these large emerging-market economies. The book brings together contributions from policy makers and scholars. It discusses the growth experiences of these countries, including how they have fared in the wake of the recent global financial crisis. It also examines these countries' prospects for sustaining strong growth over the long term. The chapters in this book offer analyses of the growth process in individual countries, including the reduction of external vulnerability in Brazil, the contribution of human and physical capital accumulation in China and Indonesia, initiatives to promote infrastructure and social development in India, and financial deepening in South Africa.--Publisher's description.
dx.doi.org OECD iLibrary
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (258 pages) : illustrations
Book
v, 44 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
630 p. : ill., maps ; 21 cm.
This book includes the work of more than 30 researchers who offer responses to issues raised by South Africa's reconstruction, growth and development goals.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780195709803 20160527
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
112 p. ; 21 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiv, 247 p. ; 24 cm.
The contributors to this volume evaluate the governmental policies necessary for the multiracial future and sustainable development of South Africa. The policy areas discussed include the economy, regional integration, energy, land reform, the law, health care, education and the media. .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780312122058 20160527
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
ii, 54 p. ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
23 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
52 p. ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxiii, 360 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • Complexity, sustainability and transition: Complexity and sustainability-- what is so unsustainable?-- crisis, transitions and sustainability. Rethinking development: Greening the developmental state-- rethinking urbanism-- soils, land and food security. From resource wars to sustainable living: Resource wars, failed states and blood consumption: Insights from Sudan. Transcending resource - and energy - intensive growth: lessons from South Africa, decoupling, urbanism and transition in Cape Town-- pioneering livable urbanism: reflections on an invisible way.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781919895239 20160607
Current economic growth strategies are rapidly depleting the natural resources and eco-system services that we depend on. As many developing countries strive to eradicate poverty via economic growth, they are all encountering the consequences of global warming and dwindling levels of cheap oil, productive soils, metals, clean water supplies and forest products. If the fast-developing large-scale countries (China, India, Brazil) and small-scale countries (South Africa, Mexico, Venezuela, Poland) want to develop in the same way and to the same level as currently developed economies, they will simply be unable to find the natural resources they require to make this happen. For these developing countries, very different solutions are required. In addition, the world's population is expected to grow by three billion by 2050 and most of these people will be living in cities in Africa and Asia. Put all this together and it is clear that some radical changes are on the way. Just transitions provides a comprehensive overview of these global challenges from the perspective of a southern, developing country. Informed by the extremely difficult task of reconciling the need to eradicate poverty with the need to rebuild our eco-system services and natural resources, this book provides us with a way of thinking about the global challenges we face and the kinds of solutions that are emerging, in particular in developing economies in the Global South. To this end, the literature and case studies the book draws on are mainly from developing country contexts, although the book discusses these and the South African challenges as part of a set of global trends. None of the recent publications on sustainable development in Africa deal with eco-system services and natural resources. This is the first book that integrates development thinking and ecological concerns. What also makes the book unique is that it is not confined to a particular field of study or discipline. The conceptual language used to tell this story is drawn from complexity theory. The authors argue that complexity theory opens up the space that is needed to develop a more trans-disciplinary understanding of a set of challenges that cannot be grasped if we remain locked into traditional disciplinary modes of thinking and they thus introduce a range of topics that are rarely discussed together in a single text. There is an obvious need for a book on sustainable development that is informed primarily by the concerns, institutional settings, literatures and dynamics that prevail in the least-developed and middle-developing economies, with special reference to Africa. This book is it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781919895239 20160607
The theme of a just transition reconciles the sustainable use of natural resources with a pervasive commitment to sufficiency (where over to consumers are satisfied with less so that under to consumers can secure enough). It explores the perplexing logics of a range of different literatures and synthesizes them to illuminate new ways of thinking from a sustainability perspective. It rethinks development with a special reference to the greening of the developmental state, explores the key role that cities could play in the transition to a more sustainably urbanized world, and highlights the neglect of soils in the global discussions around the potential of sustainable agriculture to feed the world. Case studies drawn from the African continent detail the challenges, but they are set in the context of global trends. The authors conclude with their experience of building a community that aspires to live sustainably.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789280812039 20160607
Business Library
Book
xxiii, 360 p. : ill ; 26 cm.
  • Complexity, sustainability and transition: Complexity and sustainability-- what is so unsustainable?-- crisis, transitions and sustainability. Rethinking development: Greening the developmental state-- rethinking urbanism-- soils, land and food security. From resource wars to sustainable living: Resource wars, failed states and blood consumption: Insights from Sudan. Transcending resource - and energy - intensive growth: lessons from South Africa, decoupling, urbanism and transition in Cape Town-- pioneering livable urbanism: reflections on an invisible way.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781919895239 20160607
Current economic growth strategies are rapidly depleting the natural resources and eco-system services that we depend on. As many developing countries strive to eradicate poverty via economic growth, they are all encountering the consequences of global warming and dwindling levels of cheap oil, productive soils, metals, clean water supplies and forest products. If the fast-developing large-scale countries (China, India, Brazil) and small-scale countries (South Africa, Mexico, Venezuela, Poland) want to develop in the same way and to the same level as currently developed economies, they will simply be unable to find the natural resources they require to make this happen. For these developing countries, very different solutions are required. In addition, the world's population is expected to grow by three billion by 2050 and most of these people will be living in cities in Africa and Asia. Put all this together and it is clear that some radical changes are on the way. Just transitions provides a comprehensive overview of these global challenges from the perspective of a southern, developing country. Informed by the extremely difficult task of reconciling the need to eradicate poverty with the need to rebuild our eco-system services and natural resources, this book provides us with a way of thinking about the global challenges we face and the kinds of solutions that are emerging, in particular in developing economies in the Global South. To this end, the literature and case studies the book draws on are mainly from developing country contexts, although the book discusses these and the South African challenges as part of a set of global trends. None of the recent publications on sustainable development in Africa deal with eco-system services and natural resources. This is the first book that integrates development thinking and ecological concerns. What also makes the book unique is that it is not confined to a particular field of study or discipline. The conceptual language used to tell this story is drawn from complexity theory. The authors argue that complexity theory opens up the space that is needed to develop a more trans-disciplinary understanding of a set of challenges that cannot be grasped if we remain locked into traditional disciplinary modes of thinking and they thus introduce a range of topics that are rarely discussed together in a single text. There is an obvious need for a book on sustainable development that is informed primarily by the concerns, institutional settings, literatures and dynamics that prevail in the least-developed and middle-developing economies, with special reference to Africa. This book is it.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781919895239 20160607
The theme of a just transition reconciles the sustainable use of natural resources with a pervasive commitment to sufficiency (where over to consumers are satisfied with less so that under to consumers can secure enough). It explores the perplexing logics of a range of different literatures and synthesizes them to illuminate new ways of thinking from a sustainability perspective. It rethinks development with a special reference to the greening of the developmental state, explores the key role that cities could play in the transition to a more sustainably urbanized world, and highlights the neglect of soils in the global discussions around the potential of sustainable agriculture to feed the world. Case studies drawn from the African continent detail the challenges, but they are set in the context of global trends. The authors conclude with their experience of building a community that aspires to live sustainably.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789280812039 20160607
Green Library
Book
101 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 315 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Contents Figures And Tables Acknowledgements 1: Neo-Liberalism, Social Democracy And Poverty 1.1. The Legacy Of Poverty And The Promise Of Change 1.2. Disappointment And The Spectre Of Neo-Liberalism 1.3. The Ambiguities Of Post-Apartheid Policy 1.4. Social Democratic Distributional Regimes 1.5. Outline Of Our Argument 2: Poverty Amidst Affluence 2.1. The Inheritance: Poverty At The End Of Apartheid 2.2. The Ambiguous Riches Of Data 2.3. The (Probable) Rise And Fall Of Income Poverty 2.4. Alternative Measures Of Poverty And Well-Being 2.5. High (And Probably Worsening) Income Inequality 2.6. Conclusion 3: Workers, The State And Wages 3.1. Data On Earnings 3.2. Trends In Earnings 3.3. The Earnings Of Trade Unions' Members 3.4. The 'Informalisation' Of Work 3.5. State, Market And Culture In Wage-Setting 3.6. Conclusion 4. The Economic Growth Path 4.1. The Economic Inheritance 4.2. Economic Planning During The Transition To Democracy 4.3. Macroeconomic Stabilisation: From The RDP To GEAR 4.4. Contested Visions For Labour-Market Policy, Employment And Growth 4.5. Profitability And Accumulation 4.6. The Enduring Employment Crisis And Government Strategy, 2007-12 4.7. Conclusion 5. Class And Status 5.1. Poverty And Class 5.2. Continuity And Change In The Class Structure 5.3. The Upper Classes 5.4. The Lower Middle And Working Classes 5.5. The Lower Classes: The Working Poor And The Underclass 5.6. Class Differences Between The Lower Middle, Working And Lower Classes 5.7. The Contradictions Of Social Democracy In The Global South 6: Income Support Through The Welfare State 6.1. The Welfare State, Decommodification And Neoliberalism 6.2. The Expanding Size But Unchanging Shape Of The Welfare State 6.3. The Promise Of A Comprehensive System 6.4. Ideological Contestation 6.5. Conclusion 7: The Welfare State, Public Services And The 'Social Wage' 7.1. Public Education 7.2. Public Health 7.3. Municipal Services And Housing 7.4. Conclusion 8: The Capacity And Accountability Of The Democratic State 8.1. The Capacity Of The State 8.2. The Institutional Architecture Of Democracy 8.3. Voters, Elections And Party Politics 8.4. Conclusion 9: The Power Of Business And Labour 9.1. The Power Of Big 'White' Business 9.2. The Power Of 'Black' Business 9.3. The Power Of Organised Labour 9.4. Working-Class Power, Class Compromise And The Limits Of 'Neo-Liberalism' 10: The 'Rebellion Of The Poor', Social Movements And The Limits Of Insurgent Citizenship 10.1. Continuity And Change In Urban Protest 10.2. Civic Organisation At Local And National Levels 10.3. The 'New Social Movement' Organisations 10.4. Popular Support And Local Protests 10.5. Achievements And Effects 11: Conclusion 11.1. States, Markets And Poverty 11.2. The State, Development And The Constitution Of Markets 11.3. The Politics Of Reform 11.4. Class Compromise And The Contradictions Of Social Democracy In The Global South Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137452689 20160618
When South Africa finally held its first democratic elections in 1994, the country had a much higher poverty rate than in other countries at a similar level of development. This was the legacy of apartheid. Twenty years later, poverty was still widespread. Seekings and Nattrass explain why poverty has persisted in South Africa since 1994. They demonstrate who has and who has not remained poor, how public policies both mitigated and reproduced poverty, and how and why these policies were adopted. Their analysis of the South African welfare state, labour market policies and the growth path of the South African economy challenge conventional accounts that focus only on 'neoliberalism'. They argue, instead, that policies were, in important respects, social democratic. They show how social democratic policies both mitigate and reproduce poverty in contexts such as South Africa, reflecting the contradictory nature of social democracy in the global South.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137452689 20160618
Green Library
Book
50 p. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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