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Book
[1], p. 202-213 : tables ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 300 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Whither programs in aid of the poor? -- Cash support programs -- Provision of services and goods -- Programs for the next generation -- Educating the poor -- A second chance for the working poor -- The future of anti-poverty programs.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801871221 20160528
The eighth edition of Programs in Aid of the Poor, incorporating new data from the 2000 U.S. census, will continue to serve instructors who want an up-to-date overview of current federal programs addressing poverty in the United States. Garth and Stephen Mangum along with economist and labor expert Andrew Sum have also prepared a companion volume, The Persistence of Poverty in the United States, analyzing the underlying causes of poverty and its persistence in America. Contents: 1. Whither Programs in Aid of the Poor? 2. Cash Support Programs 3. Provision of Services and Goods 4. Programs for the Next Generation 5. Education the Poor 6. A Second Chance for the Working Poor 7. The Future of Antipoverty Programs Reviews of Previous Editions: "This is a very good book. Few who have written on poverty and governmental measures to alleviate the problems of poor people have as much well-selected information and insight."--Philip Booth, Journal of Business "An excellent resource for sociologists, economists, political scientists, and social workers interested in aiding the poor."--John S. Holik, Sociology "Packed into the 140 small pages of Programs in Aid of the Poor is everything that the behavioral scientist wants to know about poor people and the programs designed to assist them but doesn't know whom to ask or what sources to consult ...Superior skill in the manipulation of quantitative information and in the building of social indices is demonstrated. It is, in short, an excellent book."--W. G. Steglich, Annals of Regional Science "A handy descriptive summary of existing programs in the American War on Poverty for both the layman and the professional economist."--Joseph A. Licari, Separatum "This is an excellent little book. It is a well written and comprehensive compendium of the variety of programs that currently exist and includes the rudiments of good analysis."--James E. Hibdon, Rocky Mountain Social Science Journal "This is a businesslike, readable, and generally useful little guide to and commentary on the United States' organized antipoverty efforts ...The programs are set forth in logical sequence, measured in dollar and manpower terms, and briefly evaluated against their objectives ...We have here a remarkably comprehensive compliation whose contents should be absorbed by those who make public policy. "--David T. Stanley, Manpower "As a primer, well-written and descriptive, this book, unlike most, will prove quite useful. No sophistication in economics is required of its audience. Thus, for the interested citizen or public official with limited time but an interest in familiarizing himself with the subject, it is a good starting point. For those with an analytic bent, however, it is a comfortable and fact-filled reference, generous in opinion and descriptive detail."--Harold M. Hochman, American Political Science Review.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780801871221 20160528
Green Library
Book
xvi, 283 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction : compulsory able-bodiedness and queer/disabled existence
  • Coming out Crip : Malibu is burning
  • Capitalism and disabled identity : Sharon Kowalski, interdependency, and queer domesticity
  • Noncompliance : The transformation, Gary Fisher, and the limits of rehabilitation
  • Composing queerness and disability : the corporate university and alternative corporealities
  • Crip eye for the normate guy : queer theory, Bob Flanagan, and the disciplining of disability studies
  • Epilogue : specters of disability.
"Crip Theory" attends to the contemporary cultures of disability and queerness that are coming out all over. Both disability studies and queer theory are centrally concerned with how bodies, pleasures, and identities are represented as "normal" or as abject, but "Crip Theory" is the first book to analyze thoroughly the ways in which these interdisciplinary fields inform each other. Drawing on feminist theory, African American and Latino/a cultural theories, composition studies, film and television studies, and theories of globalization and counter-globalization, Robert McRuer articulates the central concerns of crip theory and considers how such a critical perspective might impact cultural and historical inquiry in the humanities. "Crip Theory" puts forward readings of the Sharon Kowalski story, the performance art of Bob Flanagan, and the journals of Gary Fisher, as well as critiques of the domesticated queerness and disability marketed by the Millennium March, or Bravo TV's "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy". McRuer examines how dominant and marginal bodily and sexual identities are composed, and considers the ways that disability and queerness unsettle and re-write those identities in order to insist that another world is possible.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780814757130 20160528
Green Library
Book
240 p. ; 23 cm.
The authors review popular, legal and scientific explanations of rape and offer a new and persuasive approach to understanding violence against women. They show that rape is not common to all societies and conclude that it is linked to general levels of sexual inequality, sexism and violence. It is seen as a consequence of the development of capitalism. In supporting their thesis, the authors present material that will be of great interest to anthropologists, criminologists, political economists, and people in women's studies. 'This is the best book available on rape and will remain so for the forseeable future. It is inordinately well written, brilliantly conceived, and imaginatively researched...I wholeheartedly recommend this book .' -- William J Chamblis, University College, Cardiff 'This American book focuses on the social and economic foundations of rape. It argues that capitalism leads to both class inequalities and high levels of violence, and that it is this combination, rather than inequalities between men and women, which supports the continuation of rape. -- Studies on Women Abstracts 'This is a provocative analysis which will interest academics of all kinds.It is an interesting example of critical analysis applied to a single, social concern. ' -- Journal of the Insitute of Health Education, Vol 21 No 4, 1984 'This book makes an important contribution to understanding rape by situating it in new theoretical terrain. This account makes it clearer than ever...that there are connections between violence towards women, sexual inequality, and exploitative and oppressive social systems, and that the way out must be through profound economic and social transformation.' -- Contemporary Sociology, Vol 14 No 4, July 1985 'This book is of interest to all scholars for it provides an excellent overview of the problems with sexual inequality and rape.' -- Annals of Regional Science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803919686 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
240 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
The authors review popular, legal and scientific explanations of rape and offer a new and persuasive approach to understanding violence against women. They show that rape is not common to all societies and conclude that it is linked to general levels of sexual inequality, sexism and violence. It is seen as a consequence of the development of capitalism. In supporting their thesis, the authors present material that will be of great interest to anthropologists, criminologists, political economists, and people in women's studies. 'This is the best book available on rape and will remain so for the forseeable future. It is inordinately well written, brilliantly conceived, and imaginatively researched...I wholeheartedly recommend this book .' -- William J Chamblis, University College, Cardiff 'This American book focuses on the social and economic foundations of rape. It argues that capitalism leads to both class inequalities and high levels of violence, and that it is this combination, rather than inequalities between men and women, which supports the continuation of rape. -- Studies on Women Abstracts 'This is a provocative analysis which will interest academics of all kinds.It is an interesting example of critical analysis applied to a single, social concern. ' -- Journal of the Insitute of Health Education, Vol 21 No 4, 1984 'This book makes an important contribution to understanding rape by situating it in new theoretical terrain. This account makes it clearer than ever...that there are connections between violence towards women, sexual inequality, and exploitative and oppressive social systems, and that the way out must be through profound economic and social transformation.' -- Contemporary Sociology, Vol 14 No 4, July 1985 'This book is of interest to all scholars for it provides an excellent overview of the problems with sexual inequality and rape.' -- Annals of Regional Science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803919686 20160528
Green Library
Book
x, 302 p. ; 24 cm.
The most wide-ranging book ever published on gender-selective mass killing, or "gendercide, " this collection of essays is also the first to explore systematically the targeting of non-combatant "battle-age" males in various wartime and peacetime contexts. Representing such fields as sociology, political science, psychology, queer studies, and human-rights activism, the contributors explore themes and issues outlined by editor Adam Jones in the book's opening essay. In that article, which provoked considerable debate when it was first published in 2000, Jones argues that throughout history and around the world, the population group most consistently targeted for mass killing and state-backed oppression are non-combatant men of roughly fifteen to fifty-five years of age. Such males, Jones contends, are typically seen as "the group posing the greatest danger to the conquering force." Jones's article also examines the use of "gendercidal institutions" - such as female infanticide, witch-hunts, military conscription, and forced labor - against both women and men. The subsequent essays - some original, some drawn from a special issue of the Journal of Genocide Research and other sources - expand, diversify, and criticize this framing of gendercide. They range from a sophisticated theoretical analysis of gendercide to in-depth treatments of such topics as the Rwandan genocide of 1994, the gendercidal oppression of young African American males, the predicament of gays and lesbians in the face of increasing biotechnological manipulation of human behavior, and the psychology of shame and humiliation underlying generdercides against both sexes. Still other articles take issue with Jones's theories of gendercide, or explore how human-rights organizations have defined, documented, and responded to gendercide and other sex-specific atrocities. A closing essay considers the relevance of feminist and men's studies literatures for the study of gendercide.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826514455 20160528
Green Library
Book
4 v. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • PROVISIONAL CONTENTS Volume I: Definitions and Theories 1. Miguel de Cervantes, 'Rinconete and Cortadillo', Exemplary Stories (Oxford World Classics, 1998), pp. 71-102. 2. Michael D. Maltz, 'On Defining "Organized Crime": The Development of a Definition and a Typology', Crime and Delinquency, 1976, 22, 338-46. 3. Frank E. Hagan, 'The Organized Crime Continuum: A Further Specification of a New Conceptual Model', Criminal Justice Review, 1983, 8, 52-7. 4. Federico Varese, The Russian Mafia (Oxford University Press, 2001), pp. 3-6. 5. Letizia Paoli, 'The Paradoxes of Organized Crime', Crime, Law and Social Change, 2002, 37, 1, 51-97. 6. Daniel Bell, 'Crime as an American Way of Life', Antioch Review, 1953, 13, 131-54. 7. Peter A. Lupsha, 'Individual Choice Material Culture and Organized Crime', Criminology, 1981, 19, 3-24. 8. Dwight C. Smith, 'Paragons, Pariahs, and Pirates: A Spectrum-Based Theory of Enterprise', Crime & Delinquency, 1980, 26, 3, 358-86. 9. Mark H. Haller, 'Illegal Enterprise: A Theoretical and Historical Interpretation', Criminology, 1990, 28, 207-35. 10. Richard Hobbs, 'The Firm: Organised Crime on A Shifting Terrain', British Journal of Criminology, 2001, 41, 549-60. 11. Thomas C. Schelling, 'Economics and Criminal Enterprise', The Public Interest, 1967, 7, 61-78. 12. Thomas C. Schelling, 'What is the Business of Organized Crime?', Journal of Public Law, 1971, 20, 71-84. 13. J. M. Buchanan, 'A Defense of Organized Crime?', in S. Rottenberg (ed.), The Economics of Crime and Punishment (American Enterprise Institute, 1973), pp. 119-32. 14. P. H. Rubin, 'The Economic Theory of the Criminal Firm', in S. Rottenberg (ed.), The Economics of Crime and Punishment (American Enterprise Institute, 1973), pp. 155-66. 15. Frederic C. Lane, 'Economic Consequences of Organized Violence', Journal of Economic History, 1958, 18, 401-17. 16. Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State and Utopia (Blackwell, 1974), pp. 3-25. 17. C. Tilly, 'War Making and State Making as Organized Crime', in P. B. Evans, D. Rueschemeer, and T. Skocpol (eds.), Bringing the State Back In (Cambridge University Press, 1985), pp. 169-90. 18. Diego Gambetta, 'Fragments of an Economic Theory of the Mafia', Archives Europeennes de Sociologie, 1988, 29, 127-45. 19. Stergios Skaperdas, 'The Political Economy of Organized Crime: Providing Protection When the State Does Not', Economics of Governance, 2001, 2, 3, 173-202. 20. Donald R. Cressey, 'Methodological Problems in the Study of Organized Crime as a Social Problem', Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 1967, 374, 101-12. 21. M. K. Sparrow, 'The Application of Network Analysis to Criminal Intelligence: An Assessment of the Prospects', Social Networks, 1991, 13, 251-74. Volume II: Origins, Resources, Organization 22. Oriana Bandiera, 'Private States and the Enforcement of Property Rights: Theory and Evidence on the Origins of the Sicilian Mafia', Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, 2003, 19, 1, 218-44. 23. Federico Varese, 'Is Sicily the Future of Russia? Private Protection and the Rise of the Russian Mafia', Archives Europeennes de Sociologie, 1994, 35, 224-58. 24. David H. Stark, The Yakuza Japanese Crime Incorporated (Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 1981), pp. 26-44. 25. Curtis J. Milhaupt and Mark D. West, 'The Dark Side of Private Ordering: An Institutional and Empirical Analysis of Organized Crime', University of Chicago Law Review, 2000, 67, 1, 41-98. 26. Robert A. Rockaway, 'The Notorious Purple Gang: Detroit's All Jewish Prohibition Era Mob', Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies, 2001, 20, 1, 113-30. 27. Mark H. Haller, 'Organized Crime in Urban Society: Chicago in the 20th Century', Journal of Social History, 1971, 5, 210-34. 28. Yiu K. Chu, The Triads as Business (Routledge, 2000), pp. 11-21, 31-5. 29. Giovanni Falcone, Men of Honour (Fourth Estate, 1992), ch. 1. 30. Federico Varese, The Russian Mafia (Oxford University Press, 2001), pp. 184-6. 31. Jorge L. Borges, 'The Man on the Pink Corner', Collected Fictions (The Penguin Press, 1999). 32. Nicholas Pileggi, Wise Guy: Life in a Mafia Family (Corgi Books, 1996), pp. 59-62, 96-7. 33. Diego Gambetta, The Sicilian Mafia (Harvard University Press, 1993), ch. 6. 34. V. Pizzini, 'Gender Norms in the Sicilian Mafia, 1945-86', in M. L. Arnot and C. Usborne (eds.), Gender and Crime in Modern Europe (UCL Press, 1999), pp. 257-76. 35. Annelise Graebner Anderson, The Business of Organised Crime: A Cosa Nostra Family (Hoover Press, 1979), pp. 34-49. 36. Carlo Morselli, 'Career Opportunities and Network-Based Privileges in the Cosa Nostra', Crime, Law and Social Change, 2003, 39, 393-418. 37. Yiu K. Chu, The Triads as Business (Routledge, 2000), pp. 22-31. 38. Federico Varese, The Russian Mafia (Oxford University Press, 2001), pp. 123-44, 167-77. 39. David H. Stark, The Yakuza Japanese Crime Incorporated (Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 1981), pp. 62-131. 40. Peter Hill, The Japanese Mafia (Oxford University Press, 2003), pp. 65-91. Volume III: Organized Crime and the Penetration of Markets 41. Diego Gambetta, The Sicilian Mafia (Harvard University Press), pp. 195-225. 42. John Landesco, Organized Crime in Chicago (University of Chicago Press, 1929), ch. 2. 43. Annelise Graebner Anderson, The Business of Organised Crime (California: Hoover Press, 1979), pp. 50-74. 44. James B. Jacobs and Ellen Peters, 'Labor Racketeering: The Mafia and the Unions', Crime and Justice: An Annual Review of Research, 2003, 30, 229-82. 45. Barbara Alexander, 'The Rational Racketeer: Pasta Protection in Depression Era Chicago', Journal of Law and Economics, 1997, 40, 175-202. 46. P. Reuter, 'Racketeers as Cartel Organizers', in H. Alexander and G. Caiden (eds.), Political and Economic Perspectives on Organized Crime (D. C. Heath, 1984), pp. 49-65. 47. A. A. Block, 'The Origins of Fuel Racketeering: The Americans and the "Russians" in New York', in P. Williams (ed.), Russian Organised Crime: The New Threat? (Frank Cass, 1997), pp. 156-76. 48. Yiu K. Chu, The Triads as Business (Routledge, 2000), pp. 53-76, 83-106. 49. Timothy Frye, 'Private Protection in Russia and Poland', AJPS, June 2002, 572-84. 50. Hing, L. S. Hing, 'Casino Politics, Organized Crime and the Post-Colonial State in Macau', Journal of Contemporary China, 2005, 14, 43, 207-24. 51. Ivan Light, 'The Ethnic Vice Industry, 1880-1944', American Sociological Review, 1977, 42, 464-79. 52. Steven D. Levitt and Sudhir Venkatesh, 'An Economic Analysis Of A Drug-Selling Gang's Finances', The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2000, 115, 3, 755-89. 53. D. Steffensmeier and J. T. Ulmer, 'Number Gambling: Black and White Control of Numbers Gambling: A Cultural Asset-Social Capital View', American Sociological Review, 2006, 71, 1, 123-56. 54. Salvatore Coluccello and Simon Massey, 'Out of Africa: The Human Trade Between Libya and Lampedusa', Trends in Organized Crime, 2007, 10, 77-90. Volume IV: Organized Crime and Popular Culture, States and Terrorism 55. David E. Ruth, Inventing the Public Enemy: The Gangster in American Culture, 1918-1934 (University of Chicago Press, 1996), pp. 118-43. 56. Federico Varese, 'The Secret History of Japanese Cinema: The Yakuza Movies', Global Crime, 2006, 7, 1, 107-26. 57. Olga Matich, 'Mobster Gravestones in 1990s Russia', Global Crime, 2006, 7, 1, 79-104. 58. Salvatore Lupo, 'The Allies and the Mafia', Journal of Modern Italian Studies, 1997, 2, 1, 21-33. 59. John Landesco, Organized Crime in Chicago (University of Chicago Press, 1929), pp. 169-89. 60. A. A. Block, 'A Modern Marriage of Convenience: A Collaboration Between Organized Crime and US Intelligence', in R. J. Kelly (ed.), Organized Crime: A Global Perspective (Rowman & Littlefield, 1986), pp. 58-77. 61. K.-L. Chin and R. Godson, 'Organized Crime and the Political-Criminal Nexus in China', Trends in Organized Crime, 2006, 9, 3, 5-44. 62. Carlo Morselli and Katia Petit, 'Law-Enforcement Disruption of a Drug Importation Network', Global Crime, 2007, 8, 109-30. 63. James Jacobs and Alex Hortis, 'NYC as an Organized Crime Fighter: The Work of the Trade Waste Commission', New York Law School Law Review, 1998, 42, 1069-92. 64. Carlo Morselli, 'Scrutinizing RICO', Critical Criminology, 2004, 12, 351-69. 65. Peter Hill, P, 'Heisei Yakuza', Social Science Japan Journal, 2003, 6, 1-18. 66. Jane Schneider and Peter Schneider, 'The Mafia and Al Qaeda: Violent and Secretive Organizations in Comparative and Historical Perspective', American Anthropologist, 2002, 104, 3, 776-82. 67. Tamara Makarenko, 'The Crime Terror Continuum: Tracing the Interplay Between Transnational Organized Crime and Terrorism', Global Crime, 2004, 6, 1, 129-45. 68. Federico Varese, 'How Mafias Migrate: The Case of the 'Ndrangheta in Northern Italy', Law and Society Review, 2006, 40, 2, 411-44. 69. K. Chu, 'Hong Kong Triads after 1997', Trends in Organized Crime, 2005, 8, 3, 5-12. 70. Anton Weenink and Franca van der Laan, 'The Search for the Russian Mafia: Central and Eastern European Criminals in the Netherlands, 1989-2005', Trends in Organized Crime, 2007, 10, 4, 57-76. 71. Peter Reuter, 'The Decline of the American Mafia', The Public Interest, 1995, 120, 89-99. 72. S. Zhang and K.-L. Chin, 'The Declining Significance of Triad Societies in Transnational Illegal Activities: A Structural Deficiency Perspective', British Journal of Criminology, 2003, 43, 469-88.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415460743 20160609
The systematic study of organized crime dates back to John Landesco's classic of ethnography, Organized Crime in Chicago (1929). Since then, the field has grown considerably and, as well as criminologists and sociologists, the topic has been embraced by researchers from a broad range of disciplines, including political science, anthropology, economics, as well as literary and film studies. While at first attention was principally devoted to the study of 'traditional' organized-crime groups, such as the Sicilian and the American mafias, since the 1980s, serious scholarly work has also emerged on, for example, the Russian mafia, the Japanese Yakuza, and the Triads in both Hong Kong, China, and the USA. Furthermore, researchers have recognized that the behaviour and structure of 'traditional' organized-crime groups, and their role in both legal and illegal markets, can be fruitfully compared and contrasted to new forms of organized crime in places as varied as Africa, Columbia, Northern Ireland, and Asia. The study of organized crime has also attracted researchers interested in popular representations of the phenomenon, mainly in films and novels. Furthermore, after the events of 11 September 2001, the intersection between organized crime and terrorism, and the ability of organized-crime groups to operate transnationally and expand to new territories, has gained a new significance. As research on organized crime continues to flourish, this new title in the Routledge's Critical Concepts in Criminology series, addresses the need for an authoritative reference work to make sense of a rapidly growing and ever more complex corpus of interdisciplinary scholarly literature. Organized Crime is a four-volume collection of the foundational and the very best cutting-edge scholarship. It is also fully indexed and includes a comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which places the collected material in its historical and intellectual context. An indispensable reference collection, it is destined to be valued by scholars and students of the subject as a vital one-stop research and pedagogic resource.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415460743 20160609
Green Library
Book
xv, 311 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Contents: Studying torture, intelligence and media manipulation in the war on terror-- Strategic political communication, intelligence and its discontents: manipulating and challenging intelligence-- The rise of the torture-intelligence nexus-- The sousveillance failure of John Walker Lindh-- The surprise of sousveillance at Abu Ghraib and the struggle to contain it-- The persistence of sousveillance: Baha Mousa and torture in the British military-- The absence of sousveillance: Binyam Mohamed and the British intelligence agencies' complicity in torture-- Conclusion-- References-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781409422556 20160612
Torture, Intelligence and Sousveillance in the War on Terror examines the communication battles of the Bush and Blair political administrations (and those of their successors in America and Britain) over their use of torture, first-hand or second-hand, to gain intelligence for the War on Terror. Exploring key agenda-building drivers that exposed the torture-intelligence nexus and presenting detailed case studies of key media events from the UK and USA, this insightful volume exposes dominant political discourses on the torture-for-intelligence policy. Whether in the form of unauthorized leaks, official investigations, investigative journalism, real-time reporting, or Non-Governmental Organisation activity, this timely study evaluates various modes of resistance to governments' attempts at strategic political communication, with particular attention to 'sousveillance': community-based recording from first-person perspectives.A rigorous exposition of the power-knowledge relationships constituting the torture-intelligence nexus, which re-evaluates agenda-building models in the digital age and assesses the strength of the public sphere across the Third, Fourth and Fifth Estates, Torture, Intelligence and Sousveillance in the War on Terror will appeal to scholars across the social sciences with interests in media and communication, sociology and social theory, politics and political communication, international relations, and journalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781409422556 20160612
Green Library
Book
xxiii, 232 p. : 1 map ; 23 cm.
"How is one to explain the sudden reappearance of genocide on European soil less than a half century after the Nazi Holocaust and after three gen-erations of Europeans and Americans had come of age accepting the motto 'never again'?"-Roy Gutman, author of A Witness to Genocide. Alexandra Stiglmayer interviewed survivors of the continuing war in Bosnia-Herzegovina in order to reveal, to a seemingly deaf world, the horrors of the ongoing war in the former Yugoslavia. The women-primarily of Muslim but also of Croatian and Serbian origin-have endured the atrocities of rape and the loss of loved ones. Their testimony, published in the 1993 German edition, is bare, direct, and its cumulative effect overwhelming. The first English edition contains Stiglmayer's updates to her own two essays, one detailing the historical context of the current conflict and the other presenting the core of the book, interviews with some twenty victims of rape as well as interviews with three Serbian perpetrators. Essays investi-gating mass rape and war from ethnopsychological, sociological, cultural, and medical perspectives are included. New essays by Catharine A. MacKinnon, Rhonda Copelon, and Susan Brownmiller address the crucial issues of recognizing the human rights of women and children. A foreword by Roy Gutman describes war crimes within the context of the UN Tribunal, and an afterword by Cynthia Enloe relates the mass rapes of this war to developments and reactions in the international women's movement. Accounts of torture, murder, mutilation, abduction, sexual enslavement, and systematic attempts to impregnate-all in the name of "ethnic cleansing"-make for the grimmest of reading. However brutal and appalling the information conveyed here, this book cannot and should not be ignored. Alexandra Stiglmayer studied journalism at the University of Dortmund. Since 1992 she has been a freelance correspondent in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia for German and American radio and television. Marion Faber, the translator, is a professor of comparative literature at Swarthmore College and the translator of Nietzsche's Human, All Too Human (Nebraska 1984) and Sarah Kirsch's The Panther Woman (Nebraska 1989).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803292291 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiii, 232 p. : 1 map ; 23 cm.
"How is one to explain the sudden reappearance of genocide on European soil less than a half century after the Nazi Holocaust and after three gen-erations of Europeans and Americans had come of age accepting the motto 'never again'?"-Roy Gutman, author of A Witness to Genocide. Alexandra Stiglmayer interviewed survivors of the continuing war in Bosnia-Herzegovina in order to reveal, to a seemingly deaf world, the horrors of the ongoing war in the former Yugoslavia. The women-primarily of Muslim but also of Croatian and Serbian origin-have endured the atrocities of rape and the loss of loved ones. Their testimony, published in the 1993 German edition, is bare, direct, and its cumulative effect overwhelming. The first English edition contains Stiglmayer's updates to her own two essays, one detailing the historical context of the current conflict and the other presenting the core of the book, interviews with some twenty victims of rape as well as interviews with three Serbian perpetrators. Essays investi-gating mass rape and war from ethnopsychological, sociological, cultural, and medical perspectives are included. New essays by Catharine A. MacKinnon, Rhonda Copelon, and Susan Brownmiller address the crucial issues of recognizing the human rights of women and children. A foreword by Roy Gutman describes war crimes within the context of the UN Tribunal, and an afterword by Cynthia Enloe relates the mass rapes of this war to developments and reactions in the international women's movement. Accounts of torture, murder, mutilation, abduction, sexual enslavement, and systematic attempts to impregnate-all in the name of "ethnic cleansing"-make for the grimmest of reading. However brutal and appalling the information conveyed here, this book cannot and should not be ignored. Alexandra Stiglmayer studied journalism at the University of Dortmund. Since 1992 she has been a freelance correspondent in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia for German and American radio and television. Marion Faber, the translator, is a professor of comparative literature at Swarthmore College and the translator of Nietzsche's Human, All Too Human (Nebraska 1984) and Sarah Kirsch's The Panther Woman (Nebraska 1989).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803292291 20160528
Green Library

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