%{search_type} search results

7,325 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
xvi, 194 pages : illustration ; 23 cm
On the morning of March 5, 1959, Luvenia Long was listening to gospel music when a news bulletin interrupted her radio program. Fire had engulfed the Arkansas Negro Boys Industrial School in Wrightsville, thirteen miles outside of Little Rock. Her son Lindsey had been confined there since January 14, after a judge for juveniles found him guilty of stealing from a neighborhood store owner. To her horror, Lindsey was not among the forty-eight boys who had clawed their way through the windows of the dormitory to safety. Instead, he was among the twenty-one boys between the ages of thirteen and seventeen who burned to death.Black Boys Burning presents a focused explanation of how systemic poverty perpetuated by white supremacy sealed the fate of those students. A careful telling of the history of the school and fire, the book provides readers a fresh understanding of the broad implications of white supremacy. Grif Stockley's research adds to an evolving understanding of the Jim Crow South, Arkansas's history, the lawyers who capitalized on this tragedy, and the African American victims.In hindsight, the disaster at Wrightsville could have been predicted. Immediately after the fire, an unsigned editorial in the Arkansas Democrat noted long-term deterioration, including the wiring, of the buildings. After the Central High School Desegregation Crisis in 1957, the boys' deaths eighteen months later were once again an embarrassment to Arkansas. The fire and its circumstances should have provoked southerners to investigate the realities of their "separate but equal institutions." However, white supremacy ruled the investigations, and the grand jury declared the event to be an anomaly.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781496812698 20170911
Green Library
Book
xii, 205 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
In 1961, the U.S. government established the first formalized provisions for intercountry adoption just as it was expanding America's involvement with Vietnam. Adoption became an increasingly important portal of entry into American society for Vietnamese and Amerasian children, raising questions about the United States' obligations to refugees and the nature of the family during an era of heightened anxiety about U.S. global interventions. Whether adopting or favoring the migration of multiracial individuals, Americans believed their norms and material comforts would salve the wounds of a divisive war. However, Vietnamese migrants challenged these efforts of reconciliation. As Allison Varzally details in this book, a desire to redeem defeat in Vietnam, faith in the nuclear family, and commitment to capitalism guided American efforts on behalf of Vietnamese youths. By tracing the stories of Vietnamese migrants, however, Varzally reveals that while many had accepted separations as a painful strategy for survival in the midst of war, most sought, and some eventually found, reunion with their kin. This book makes clear the role of adult adoptees in Vietnamese and American debates about the forms, privileges, and duties of families, and places Vietnamese children at the center of American and Vietnamese efforts to assign responsibility and find peace in the aftermath of conflict.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469630915 20170306
Green Library
Book
301 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: Conquest and incarceration
  • An eliminatory option
  • Hobos in heaven
  • Not imprisonment in a legal sense
  • Scorpion's tale
  • Caged birds
  • Justice for Samuel Faulkner
  • Conclusion: Upriver in the age of mass Incarceration
  • The rebel archive.
Los Angeles incarcerates more people than any other city in the United States, which imprisons more people than any other nation on Earth. This book explains how the City of Angels became the capital city of the world's leading incarcerator. Marshaling more than two centuries of evidence, historian Kelly Lytle Hernandez unmasks how histories of native elimination, immigrant exclusion, and black disappearance drove the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles. In this telling, which spans from the Spanish colonial era to the outbreak of the 1965 Watts Rebellion, Hernandez documents the persistent historical bond between the racial fantasies of conquest, namely its settler colonial form, and the eliminatory capacities of incarceration. But City of Inmates is also a chronicle of resilience and rebellion, documenting how targeted peoples and communities have always fought back. They busted out of jail, forced Supreme Court rulings, advanced revolution across bars and borders, and, as in the summer of 1965, set fire to the belly of the city. With these acts those who fought the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles altered the course of history in the city, the borderlands, and beyond. This book recounts how the dynamics of conquest met deep reservoirs of rebellion as Los Angeles became the City of Inmates, the nation's carceral core. It is a story that is far from over.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469631189 20170424
Law Library (Crown)
Book
301 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • An eliminatory option
  • Hobos in Heaven
  • Not imprisonment in a legal sense
  • Scorpion's tale
  • Caged birds
  • Justice for Samuel Faulkner
  • Conclusion : upriver in the age of mass Incarceration
  • The rebel archive.
Los Angeles incarcerates more people than any other city in the United States, which imprisons more people than any other nation on Earth. This book explains how the City of Angels became the capital city of the world's leading incarcerator. Marshaling more than two centuries of evidence, historian Kelly Lytle Hernandez unmasks how histories of native elimination, immigrant exclusion, and black disappearance drove the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles. In this telling, which spans from the Spanish colonial era to the outbreak of the 1965 Watts Rebellion, Hernandez documents the persistent historical bond between the racial fantasies of conquest, namely its settler colonial form, and the eliminatory capacities of incarceration. But City of Inmates is also a chronicle of resilience and rebellion, documenting how targeted peoples and communities have always fought back. They busted out of jail, forced Supreme Court rulings, advanced revolution across bars and borders, and, as in the summer of 1965, set fire to the belly of the city. With these acts those who fought the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles altered the course of history in the city, the borderlands, and beyond. This book recounts how the dynamics of conquest met deep reservoirs of rebellion as Los Angeles became the City of Inmates, the nation's carceral core. It is a story that is far from over.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469631189 20170424
Green Library
Book
41 pages ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
127 pages : illustrations, charts ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
227 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
  • Reclusive aristocrats
  • The residents of Glenwood
  • Pink and Sister
  • Murder at Glenburnie
  • The investigation
  • Jim Crow's investigation
  • National scandal
  • Sideshows
  • Cold justice
  • Hollow victory
  • Longing for home.
In 1932, the city of Natchez, Mississippi, reckoned with an unexpected influx of journalists and tourists as the lurid story of a local murder was splashed across headlines nationwide. Two eccentrics, Richard Dana and Octavia Dockery-known in the press as the ""Wild Man"" and the ""Goat Woman""-enlisted an African American man named George Pearls to rob their reclusive neighbor, Jennie Merrill, at her estate. During the attempted robbery, Merrill was shot and killed. The crime drew national coverage when it came to light that Dana and Dockery, the alleged murderers, shared their huge, decaying antebellum mansion with their goats and other livestock, which prompted journalists to call the estate ""Goat Castle."" Pearls was killed by an Arkansas policeman in an unrelated incident before he could face trial. However, as was all too typical in the Jim Crow South, the white community demanded ""justice, "" and an innocent black woman named Emily Burns was ultimately sent to prison for the murder of Merrill. Dana and Dockery not only avoided punishment but also lived to profit from the notoriety of the murder.In telling this strange, fascinating story, Karen Cox highlights the larger ideas that made the tale so irresistible to the popular press and provides a unique lens through which to view the transformation of the plantation South into the fallen, gothic South.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469635033 20171023
Green Library
Book
x, 213 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
Ashley Baggett uncovers the voices of abused women who utilized the legal system in New Orleans to address their grievances from the antebellum era to the end of the nineteenth century. Poring over 26,000 records, Baggett analyzes 421 criminal cases involving intimate partner violence - physical or emotional abuse of a partner in a romantic relationship - revealing a significant demand among women, the community, and the courts for reform in the postbellum decades. Before the Civil War, some challenges and limits to the male privilege of chastisement existed, but the gendered power structure and the veil of privacy for families in the courts largely shielded abusers from criminal prosecution. However, the war upended gender expectations and increased female autonomy, leading to the demand for and brief recognition of women's right to be free from violence. Baggett demonstrates how postbellum decades offered a fleeting opportunity for change before the gender and racial expectations hardened with the rise of Jim Crow. Her findings reveal previously unseen dimensions of women's lives both inside and outside legal marriage and women's attempts to renegotiate power in relationships. Highlighting the lived experiences of these women, Baggett tracks how gender, race, and location worked together to define and redefine gender expectations and legal rights. Moreover, she demonstrates recognition of women's legal personhood as well as differences between northern and southern states' trajectories in response to intimate partner violence during the nineteenth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781496815217 20171121
Green Library
Book
x, 213 pages ; 24 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (ii, 160 page)
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
On December 7, 2015, the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) , Civil Rights Division, Special Litigation Section, and the United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Illinois, jointly initiated an investigation of the City of Chicago’s Police Department (CPD) and the Independent Police Review Authority (IPRA). This investigation was undertaken to determine whether the Chicago Police Department is engaging in a pattern or practice of unlawful conduct and, if so, what systemic deficiencies or practices within CPD, IPRA, and the City might be facilitating or causing this pattern or practice. Our investigation assessed CPD’s use of force, including deadly force, and addressed CPD policies, training, reporting, investigation, and review related to officer use of force. The investigation further addressed CPD ’s and IPRA’s systems of accountability both as they relate to officer use of force and officer misconduct, including the intake, investigation, and review of allegations of officer misconduct, and the imposition of discipline or other corrective action. We also investigated racial, ethnic, or other disparities in CPD’s force and accountability practices, and assessed how those disparities inform the breakdown in community trust
Book
1 online resource (20 pages) Digital: text file.
Collection
Government Information International Collection
"Media have played an important role in framing the public debate on the “refugee crisis” that peaked in autumn of 2015. This report examines the narratives developed by print media in eight European countries and how they contributed to the public perception of the “crisis”, shifting from careful tolerance over the summer, to an outpouring of solidarity and humanitarianism in September 2015, and to a securitisation of the debate and a narrative of fear in November 2015."--Document home page.
Book
283 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxxvii, 117 pages ; 24 cm.
At the height of the civil rights movement in Mississippi, as hundreds of volunteers prepared for the 1964 Freedom Summer Project, the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) compiled hundreds of statements from activists and everyday citizens who endured police abuse and vigilante violence. Fifty-seven of those testimonies appear in Mississippi Black Paper. The statements recount how white officials and everyday citizens employed assassinations, beatings, harassment, and petty meanness to block any change in the state's segregated status quo.The testimonies in Mississippi Black Paper come from well-known civil rights heroes such as Fannie Lou Hamer, Aaron Henry, and Rita Schwerner, but the book also brings new voices and stories to the fore. Alongside these iconic names appear grassroots activists and everyday people who endured racial terror and harassment for challenging, sometimes in seemingly imperceptible ways, the state's white supremacy.This new edition includes the original foreword by Reinhold Neibuhr and the original introduction by Mississippi journalist Hodding Carter III, as well as Jason Morgan Ward's new introduction that places the book in its context as a vital source in the history of the civil rights movement.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781496813435 20170907
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxxvii, 117 pages ; 24 cm.
At the height of the civil rights movement in Mississippi, as hundreds of volunteers prepared for the 1964 Freedom Summer Project, the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) compiled hundreds of statements from activists and everyday citizens who endured police abuse and vigilante violence. Fifty-seven of those testimonies appear in Mississippi Black Paper. The statements recount how white officials and everyday citizens employed assassinations, beatings, harassment, and petty meanness to block any change in the state's segregated status quo.The testimonies in Mississippi Black Paper come from well-known civil rights heroes such as Fannie Lou Hamer, Aaron Henry, and Rita Schwerner, but the book also brings new voices and stories to the fore. Alongside these iconic names appear grassroots activists and everyday people who endured racial terror and harassment for challenging, sometimes in seemingly imperceptible ways, the state's white supremacy.This new edition includes the original foreword by Reinhold Neibuhr and the original introduction by Mississippi journalist Hodding Carter III, as well as Jason Morgan Ward's new introduction that places the book in its context as a vital source in the history of the civil rights movement.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781496813435 20170907
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (109 pages) Digital: text file.
Collection
Government Information International Collection
"The police are at the frontline of the criminal justice system and the first point of contact for many victims of hate crime. This manual is designed for police trainers, investigators, managers, hate crime officers and frontline police officers working in countries across the Council of Europe region to develop essential skills to identify and investigate hate crimes against LGBTI persons."--Document home page.
Book
xiv, 252 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Into the family life of strangers : the origins of foster family care
  • The New Deal, family security, and the emergence of a public child welfare system
  • Helping America's orphans of war
  • Providing love and care : foster parents as parents
  • The hard-to-place child : family pathology, race, and poverty
  • Compensated motherhood and the state : foster parents as workers
  • Poverty, punishment, and public assistance : reorienting foster family care.
In the 1930s, buoyed by the potential of the New Deal, child welfare reformers hoped to formalize and modernize their methods, partly through professional casework but more importantly through the loving care of temporary, substitute families. Today, however, the foster care system is widely criticized for failing the children and families it is intended to help. How did a vision of dignified services become virtually synonymous with the breakup of poor families and a disparaged form of ""welfare"" that stigmatizes the women who provide it, the children who receive it, and their families? Tracing the evolution of the modern American foster care system from its inception in the 1930s through the 1970s, Catherine Rymph argues that deeply gendered, domestic ideals, implicit assumptions about the relative value of poor children, and the complex public/private nature of American welfare provision fueled the cultural resistance to funding maternal and parental care. What emerged was a system of public social provision that was actually subsidized by foster families themselves, most of whom were concentrated toward the socioeconomic lower half, much like the children they served. Analyzing the ideas, debates, and policies surrounding foster care and foster parents' relationship to public welfare, Rymph reveals the framework for the building of the foster care system and draws out its implications for today's child support networks.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469635644 20171023
Green Library
Book
63 pages ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
xix, 379 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • List of Maps, Tables, and FiguresAbbreviationsAcknowledgmentsIntroductionSection I. The Zetas: Criminal Paramilitaries in a Transnational BusinessChapter 1. The Zetas' OriginsChapter 2. The Zetas' WarChapter 3. A Transnational Criminal CorporationSection II. Mexico's Drug War: A Modern Civil War?Chapter 4. Paramilitarization of Organized Crime and a "War on Drugs"Chapter 5. The New Paramilitarism in MexicoChapter 6. Mexico's Modern Civil WarSection III. Los Zetas IncorporatedChapter 7. The Zetas' War and Mexico's Energy SectorChapter 8. Energy and Security in Tamaulipas, Ground Zero for the ZetasChapter 9. Who Benefits from the Zetas' War?Conclusion. Four Successful Business Models in an Era of Modern Civil WarsAppendix 1. Energy Reform and the Zetas' Expansion (Timeline)Appendix 2. History of Organized Crime in Tamaulipas: Timeline of Key EventsAppendix 3. Map of Criminal Paramilitaries and Natural Resources in MexicoAppendix 4. El disfraz de la guerra (The War's Disguise): Communique by Residents of La RiberenaAppendix 5. Organizational Charts: Constellis Holdings, LLC, and Los Zetas Inc.Appendix 6. Areas of Dominant Influence of Major TCOs in Mexico, 2015NotesReferencesIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477312759 20170907
The rapid growth of organized crime in Mexico and the government's response to it have driven an unprecedented rise in violence and impelled major structural economic changes, including the recent passage of energy reform. Los Zetas Inc. asserts that these phenomena are a direct and intended result of the emergence of the brutal Zetas criminal organization in the Mexican border state of Tamaulipas. Going beyond previous studies of the group as a drug trafficking organization, Guadalupe Correa-Cabrera builds a convincing case that the Zetas and similar organizations effectively constitute transnational corporations with business practices that include the trafficking of crude oil, natural gas, and gasoline; migrant and weapons smuggling; kidnapping for ransom; and video and music piracy. Combining vivid interview commentary with in-depth analysis of organized crime as a transnational and corporate phenomenon, Los Zetas Inc. proposes a new theoretical framework for understanding the emerging face, new structure, and economic implications of organized crime in Mexico. Correa-Cabrera delineates the Zetas establishment, structure, and forms of operation, along with the reactions to this new model of criminality by the state and other lawbreaking, foreign, and corporate actors. Since the Zetas share some characteristics with legal transnational businesses that operate in the energy and private security industries, she also compares this criminal corporation with ExxonMobil, Halliburton, and Blackwater (renamed "Academi" and now a Constellis company). Asserting that the elevated level of violence between the Zetas and the Mexican state resembles a civil war, Correa-Cabrera identifies the beneficiaries of this war, including arms-producing companies, the international banking system, the US border economy, the US border security/military-industrial complex, and corporate capital, especially international oil and gas companies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477312759 20170907
Green Library
Book
170 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Vorwort / Helge Heidemeyer
  • Die Akten
  • Aktenlagen : zum mit- und Abhören im geteilten Deutschland / Ilko-Sascha Kowalczuk
  • Von Volksmusikern, Hundezüchtern und ranziger Margarine : aus den Berichten der Abteilung Information des Jahres 1956 / Henrik Bispinck
  • Lehrverbot und Parteiausschluss für Robert Havemann : "Provokation der Westdeutschen" oder von der SED geplanter "politischer Tod"? / Bernd Florath
  • Quellen, Zeitzeugen und Historiker : Verschiedene Sichtweisen auf die SIRA-Datenbank der MfS-Auslandsspionage (HV A) / Georg Herbstritt
  • "ischschwöre Berlin" oder Geschichte rund um den "Bindestrich der Freiheit" / Christian Adam
  • Die Staatssicherheit und das Herrschaftssystem
  • Staatssicherheit in der Region : die geheimen Berichte der MfS-Kreisdienststelle Halberstadt an die Partei / Daniela Münkel
  • "Politisch-operatives Zusammenwirken"? Zur Rivalität von Staatssicherheit und Volkspolizei in der Ära Ulbricht / Tobias Wunschik
  • Die Sichtbarkeit der geheimen Polizei : zur öffentlichen Darstellung und Wahrnehmung der Staatssicherheit im DDR-Alltag / Jens Gieseke
  • Die Dysfunktionalität des MfS
  • Hans-Joachim Geyer : der Doppelagent aus der Provinz / Elke Stadelmann-Wenz
  • Suff, Westverwandte und Schlamperei : der "Feind" in der Provinz : die Steuerungsprobleme des MfS am Beispiel der Kreisdienststelle Gransee / Christian Booß
  • "Konnte gut organisieren" : die Geschäfte des Gert Trebeljahr / Helge Heidemeyer
  • Abkürzungen
  • Biografische Notizen.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxxx, 290 pages ; 28 cm + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)