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Book
xxvi, 310 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • The evolution of food as social assistance : an overview / Harold Alderman, Ugo Gentilini, Ruslan Yemtsov
  • The public distribution system in India : policy evolution and program delivery trends / Shrayana Bhattacharya, Vanita Leah Falcao, Raghav Puri
  • The Tamween fuood subsidy system in Egypt : evolution and recent implemantation reforms / Moustufa Abdalla, Sherine Al-Shawarby
  • Food-based social assistance programs in Sri Lanka : evolution and transition to cash transfers / Ganga Tilakaratna, Chinthani Sooriyamudali
  • From food subsidies to targeted transfers in Mexico / John Scott, Citlalli Hernández
  • Evolution and implementation of the supplemental nutrition assistance program in the United States / Victor Oliveira, Laura Tiehen, Mark Prell, David Smallwood
  • Evolution and implementation of the Rastra program in Indonesia / Peter Timmer, Hastuti, Sudarno Sumarto.
This book addresses the thorny and fascinating question of how food and voucher programs, despite theory and evidence generally favoring cash, remain relevant, have evolved, and, in most circumstances, have improved over time. In doing so, we take an evolutionary and pragmatic view; we are interested in understanding why food-based programs exist and how countries can benefit from transformations such as that of Chhattisgarh, not in determining whether those programs should exist.
Green Library
Book
xvi, 194 pages : illustration ; 23 cm
On the morning of March 5, 1959, Luvenia Long was listening to gospel music when a news bulletin interrupted her radio program. Fire had engulfed the Arkansas Negro Boys Industrial School in Wrightsville, thirteen miles outside of Little Rock. Her son Lindsey had been confined there since January 14, after a judge for juveniles found him guilty of stealing from a neighborhood store owner. To her horror, Lindsey was not among the forty-eight boys who had clawed their way through the windows of the dormitory to safety. Instead, he was among the twenty-one boys between the ages of thirteen and seventeen who burned to death.Black Boys Burning presents a focused explanation of how systemic poverty perpetuated by white supremacy sealed the fate of those students. A careful telling of the history of the school and fire, the book provides readers a fresh understanding of the broad implications of white supremacy. Grif Stockley's research adds to an evolving understanding of the Jim Crow South, Arkansas's history, the lawyers who capitalized on this tragedy, and the African American victims.In hindsight, the disaster at Wrightsville could have been predicted. Immediately after the fire, an unsigned editorial in the Arkansas Democrat noted long-term deterioration, including the wiring, of the buildings. After the Central High School Desegregation Crisis in 1957, the boys' deaths eighteen months later were once again an embarrassment to Arkansas. The fire and its circumstances should have provoked southerners to investigate the realities of their "separate but equal institutions." However, white supremacy ruled the investigations, and the grand jury declared the event to be an anomaly.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781496812698 20170911
Green Library
Book
xii, 205 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
In 1961, the U.S. government established the first formalized provisions for intercountry adoption just as it was expanding America's involvement with Vietnam. Adoption became an increasingly important portal of entry into American society for Vietnamese and Amerasian children, raising questions about the United States' obligations to refugees and the nature of the family during an era of heightened anxiety about U.S. global interventions. Whether adopting or favoring the migration of multiracial individuals, Americans believed their norms and material comforts would salve the wounds of a divisive war. However, Vietnamese migrants challenged these efforts of reconciliation. As Allison Varzally details in this book, a desire to redeem defeat in Vietnam, faith in the nuclear family, and commitment to capitalism guided American efforts on behalf of Vietnamese youths. By tracing the stories of Vietnamese migrants, however, Varzally reveals that while many had accepted separations as a painful strategy for survival in the midst of war, most sought, and some eventually found, reunion with their kin. This book makes clear the role of adult adoptees in Vietnamese and American debates about the forms, privileges, and duties of families, and places Vietnamese children at the center of American and Vietnamese efforts to assign responsibility and find peace in the aftermath of conflict.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469630915 20170306
Green Library
Book
301 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: Conquest and incarceration
  • An eliminatory option
  • Hobos in heaven
  • Not imprisonment in a legal sense
  • Scorpion's tale
  • Caged birds
  • Justice for Samuel Faulkner
  • Conclusion: Upriver in the age of mass Incarceration
  • The rebel archive.
Los Angeles incarcerates more people than any other city in the United States, which imprisons more people than any other nation on Earth. This book explains how the City of Angels became the capital city of the world's leading incarcerator. Marshaling more than two centuries of evidence, historian Kelly Lytle Hernandez unmasks how histories of native elimination, immigrant exclusion, and black disappearance drove the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles. In this telling, which spans from the Spanish colonial era to the outbreak of the 1965 Watts Rebellion, Hernandez documents the persistent historical bond between the racial fantasies of conquest, namely its settler colonial form, and the eliminatory capacities of incarceration. But City of Inmates is also a chronicle of resilience and rebellion, documenting how targeted peoples and communities have always fought back. They busted out of jail, forced Supreme Court rulings, advanced revolution across bars and borders, and, as in the summer of 1965, set fire to the belly of the city. With these acts those who fought the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles altered the course of history in the city, the borderlands, and beyond. This book recounts how the dynamics of conquest met deep reservoirs of rebellion as Los Angeles became the City of Inmates, the nation's carceral core. It is a story that is far from over.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469631189 20170424
Law Library (Crown)
Book
301 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
  • An eliminatory option
  • Hobos in Heaven
  • Not imprisonment in a legal sense
  • Scorpion's tale
  • Caged birds
  • Justice for Samuel Faulkner
  • Conclusion : upriver in the age of mass Incarceration
  • The rebel archive.
Los Angeles incarcerates more people than any other city in the United States, which imprisons more people than any other nation on Earth. This book explains how the City of Angels became the capital city of the world's leading incarcerator. Marshaling more than two centuries of evidence, historian Kelly Lytle Hernandez unmasks how histories of native elimination, immigrant exclusion, and black disappearance drove the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles. In this telling, which spans from the Spanish colonial era to the outbreak of the 1965 Watts Rebellion, Hernandez documents the persistent historical bond between the racial fantasies of conquest, namely its settler colonial form, and the eliminatory capacities of incarceration. But City of Inmates is also a chronicle of resilience and rebellion, documenting how targeted peoples and communities have always fought back. They busted out of jail, forced Supreme Court rulings, advanced revolution across bars and borders, and, as in the summer of 1965, set fire to the belly of the city. With these acts those who fought the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles altered the course of history in the city, the borderlands, and beyond. This book recounts how the dynamics of conquest met deep reservoirs of rebellion as Los Angeles became the City of Inmates, the nation's carceral core. It is a story that is far from over.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469631189 20170424
Green Library
Book
111 pages ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
41 pages ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
85 pages ; 30 cm
This joint report prepared by the EMCDDA and Europol considers the latest findings from international research, fresh empirical data, and operational information and intelligence in order to illuminate how darknet markets function and how they relate to criminal behaviour. The publication adopts an EU focus of what is a global phenomenon. It is comprehensive but accessible and policy-oriented, intended to facilitate discussions at EU-level on how to respond to darknet drug markets, whilst identifying key priority areas that require attention and where activities are likely to have most impact.
Green Library
Book
127 pages : illustrations, charts ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
106 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
214 pages ; 23 cm
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Collective Violence and Popular Justice in the Later Middle Ages / Hannah Skoda
  • 2. Unofficial Justice and Community in Rural Russia, 1856
  • 1914 / Stephen P. Frank
  • 3. "A lei de Lynch": Reconsidering the View from Brazil of Lynching in the United States, 1880s
  • 1920s / Amy Chazkel
  • 4. Lynching, Religion, and Politics in Twentieth-Century Puebla / Gema Santamaria
  • 5. "Canadians Are Not Proficient in the Art of Lynching": Mob Violence, Social Regulation, and National Identity / Brent M. S. Campney
  • 6. "Negro and White Unite": The Communist Party's Campaign against Lynching in Indiana and Maryland, 1930
  • 1933 / Dean J. Kotlowski
  • 7. Bonded in Hate: The Violent Development of American Skinhead Culture / Ryan Shaffer.
"This project, the first of two on global collective violence, focuses on Asia, Africa and the Middle East. While the term "lynching" signifies an American concept, the practice of lynching is a global phenomenon. Edited by Michael Pfeifer, the project looks at the global practice of lynching and related varieties of collective violence, such as rioting, vigilantism, and terrorism, across world cultures. The included essays highlight both the universality of mob violence across cultures and eras and the particularity of its occurrence in certain cultural and historical contexts. With essays investigating collective violence in Indonesia, Nanking, India, South Africa, among other countries, this project exhibits a transnational approach that reconsiders lynching outside of a strictly American context, thereby upending the notion of lynching as an exceptional American experience. With a roster of contributing scholars from a variety of academic disciplines and nations, this volume situates American mob violence as one significant variety of global collective violence among many"-- Provided by publisher.
"Often considered peculiarly American, lynching in fact takes place around the world. In the first book of a two-volume study, Michael J. Pfeifer collects essays that look at lynching and related forms of collective violence in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Understanding lynching as a transnational phenomenon rooted in political and cultural flux, the writers probe important issues from Indonesia--where a long history of public violence now twines with the Internet--to South Africa, with its notorious history of necklacing. Other scholars examine lynching in medieval Nepal, the epidemic of summary executions in late Qing-era China, the merging of state-sponsored and local collective violence during the Nanking Massacre, and the ways public anger and lynching in India relate to identity, autonomy, and territory. Contributors: Laurens Bakker, Shaiel Ben-Ephraim, Nandana Dutta, Weiting Guo, Or Honig, Frank Jacob, Michael J. Pfeifer, Yogesh Raj, and Nicholas Rush Smith"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
227 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
  • Reclusive aristocrats
  • The residents of Glenwood
  • Pink and Sister
  • Murder at Glenburnie
  • The investigation
  • Jim Crow's investigation
  • National scandal
  • Sideshows
  • Cold justice
  • Hollow victory
  • Longing for home.
In 1932, the city of Natchez, Mississippi, reckoned with an unexpected influx of journalists and tourists as the lurid story of a local murder was splashed across headlines nationwide. Two eccentrics, Richard Dana and Octavia Dockery-known in the press as the ""Wild Man"" and the ""Goat Woman""-enlisted an African American man named George Pearls to rob their reclusive neighbor, Jennie Merrill, at her estate. During the attempted robbery, Merrill was shot and killed. The crime drew national coverage when it came to light that Dana and Dockery, the alleged murderers, shared their huge, decaying antebellum mansion with their goats and other livestock, which prompted journalists to call the estate ""Goat Castle."" Pearls was killed by an Arkansas policeman in an unrelated incident before he could face trial. However, as was all too typical in the Jim Crow South, the white community demanded ""justice, "" and an innocent black woman named Emily Burns was ultimately sent to prison for the murder of Merrill. Dana and Dockery not only avoided punishment but also lived to profit from the notoriety of the murder.In telling this strange, fascinating story, Karen Cox highlights the larger ideas that made the tale so irresistible to the popular press and provides a unique lens through which to view the transformation of the plantation South into the fallen, gothic South.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469635033 20171023
Green Library
Book
21 pages : illustrations ; 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
18 pages : charts ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 213 pages : maps ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • "Husbands are men, not angels" : gender and intimate partner violence in antebellum New Orleans
  • "We are all men" : transforming gender expectations in New Orleans during the Civil War and Reconstruction
  • "Strike me if you dare" : abused women of New Orleans and the right to be free from violence
  • "You can't abuse her in this house" : family, community, and intimate partner violence in New Orleans
  • "The rule of love has superseded the rule of force" : the criminalization of intimate partner violence in New Orleans
  • "It will be done to maintain white supremacy" : the decline of intervention in the South
  • Epilogue: Gender and intimate partner violence in the early 1900s.
Ashley Baggett uncovers the voices of abused women who utilized the legal system in New Orleans to address their grievances from the antebellum era to the end of the nineteenth century. Poring over 26,000 records, Baggett analyzes 421 criminal cases involving intimate partner violence - physical or emotional abuse of a partner in a romantic relationship - revealing a significant demand among women, the community, and the courts for reform in the postbellum decades. Before the Civil War, some challenges and limits to the male privilege of chastisement existed, but the gendered power structure and the veil of privacy for families in the courts largely shielded abusers from criminal prosecution. However, the war upended gender expectations and increased female autonomy, leading to the demand for and brief recognition of women's right to be free from violence. Baggett demonstrates how postbellum decades offered a fleeting opportunity for change before the gender and racial expectations hardened with the rise of Jim Crow. Her findings reveal previously unseen dimensions of women's lives both inside and outside legal marriage and women's attempts to renegotiate power in relationships. Highlighting the lived experiences of these women, Baggett tracks how gender, race, and location worked together to define and redefine gender expectations and legal rights. Moreover, she demonstrates recognition of women's legal personhood as well as differences between northern and southern states' trajectories in response to intimate partner violence during the nineteenth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781496815217 20180122
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 213 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
Ashley Baggett uncovers the voices of abused women who utilized the legal system in New Orleans to address their grievances from the antebellum era to the end of the nineteenth century. Poring over 26,000 records, Baggett analyzes 421 criminal cases involving intimate partner violence - physical or emotional abuse of a partner in a romantic relationship - revealing a significant demand among women, the community, and the courts for reform in the postbellum decades. Before the Civil War, some challenges and limits to the male privilege of chastisement existed, but the gendered power structure and the veil of privacy for families in the courts largely shielded abusers from criminal prosecution. However, the war upended gender expectations and increased female autonomy, leading to the demand for and brief recognition of women's right to be free from violence. Baggett demonstrates how postbellum decades offered a fleeting opportunity for change before the gender and racial expectations hardened with the rise of Jim Crow. Her findings reveal previously unseen dimensions of women's lives both inside and outside legal marriage and women's attempts to renegotiate power in relationships. Highlighting the lived experiences of these women, Baggett tracks how gender, race, and location worked together to define and redefine gender expectations and legal rights. Moreover, she demonstrates recognition of women's legal personhood as well as differences between northern and southern states' trajectories in response to intimate partner violence during the nineteenth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781496815217 20171121
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (ii, 160 page)
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
On December 7, 2015, the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) , Civil Rights Division, Special Litigation Section, and the United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Illinois, jointly initiated an investigation of the City of Chicago’s Police Department (CPD) and the Independent Police Review Authority (IPRA). This investigation was undertaken to determine whether the Chicago Police Department is engaging in a pattern or practice of unlawful conduct and, if so, what systemic deficiencies or practices within CPD, IPRA, and the City might be facilitating or causing this pattern or practice. Our investigation assessed CPD’s use of force, including deadly force, and addressed CPD policies, training, reporting, investigation, and review related to officer use of force. The investigation further addressed CPD ’s and IPRA’s systems of accountability both as they relate to officer use of force and officer misconduct, including the intake, investigation, and review of allegations of officer misconduct, and the imposition of discipline or other corrective action. We also investigated racial, ethnic, or other disparities in CPD’s force and accountability practices, and assessed how those disparities inform the breakdown in community trust
Book
24 pages ; 28 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (20 pages) Digital: text file.
Collection
Government Information International Collection
"Media have played an important role in framing the public debate on the “refugee crisis” that peaked in autumn of 2015. This report examines the narratives developed by print media in eight European countries and how they contributed to the public perception of the “crisis”, shifting from careful tolerance over the summer, to an outpouring of solidarity and humanitarianism in September 2015, and to a securitisation of the debate and a narrative of fear in November 2015."--Document home page.
Book
283 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Green Library