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Book
xiv, 236 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • List of illustrations Acknowledgements Introduction: Ladders and Snakes Meritocracy as plutocracy What's wrong with meritocracy? Five problems Meritocracy as social system and as ideological discourse How this book is organised Part one: Genealogies Chapter one: Meritocracy's genealogies in social theory Never start with the dictionary Early genealogies, histories and geographies Ladders and level playing field Socialist roots and critique Social democratic meritocracy The critique of educational essentialism 'Just' meritocracy? The beginnings of neoliberal meritocracy Meritocracy in the neoliberal meritocracy Chapter two: 'Rising up': gender, ethnicity, class and the meritocratic deficit See where your talent takes you Partial progression and painful ladders: mid century welfare Pulling rank: problems with welfarist 'rising up' Selling 1968 Parables of progress: luminous media fables Not so cool: unequal employment Selling inequality: post-feminism, post-race...post-class? Neoliberal justice narratives The egalitarian and the meritocratic deficit Chapter three: The movement of meritocracy in political rhetoric Meritocratic feeling Thatcherism in Britain Major meritocracy Blairism and beyond Aspiration Nation Tragi-comedy: Bojo's 'hard work' Blue-collar billionaires: Farage, Trump and the destabilisation of merit Theresa May and the Middle England meritocrats Aspiration for all? Meritocracy vs. mutuality Part two: Popular parables Chapter four: Just like us? Normcore plutocrats and the popularisation of elitism Meritocracy and the extension of privilege The 1%, the new rentiers and transnational asset-stripping Normcore plutocrats Normcore aristocrats The kind parent Luxury-flaunters The new rich are different Chapter five: #Damonsplaining and the unbearable whiteness of 'merit' #Damonsplaining and externalised white male privilege Post-racial meritocracy The racialization of merit: people The racialization of merit: products The racialization of merit: production Trying to shut women up Calling out the myth of postracial meritocracy Externalised and internalised neoliberal meritocracy Chapter six: Desperate success: Managing the mumpreneur Doing it all Child labour Desperate success Entrepreneurial Man Magical femininity The mumpreneur and the branded self Disaggregation and alternatives Conclusion: Beyond neoliberal meritocracy Failing to convince The journeys of meritocracy What's the alternative? Changing the cultural pull of meritocratic hope Alternatives to the ladder Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138889552 20171009
Meritocracy today involves the idea that whatever your social position at birth, society ought to offer enough opportunity and mobility for 'talent' to combine with 'effort' in order to 'rise to the top'. This idea is one of the prevalent social and cultural tropes of our time, as palpable in the speeches of politicians as in popular culture. In this book Jo Littler argues that meritocracy is the key cultural means of legitimation for contemporary neoliberal culture -- and that whilst it promises opportunity, it in fact creates new forms of social division. Against Meritocracy is split into two parts. Part I explores the genealogies of meritocracy within social theory, political discourse and working cultures. It traces the dramatic U-turn in meritocracy's meaning, from socialist slur to a contemporary ideal of how a society should be organised. Part II uses a series of case studies to analyse the cultural pull of popular 'parables of progress', from reality TV to the super-rich and celebrity CEOs, from social media controversies to the rise of the 'mumpreneur'. Paying special attention to the role of gender, 'race' and class, this book provides new conceptualisations of the meaning of meritocracy in contemporary culture and society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138889552 20171009
Green Library
Book
201 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Future Cities: The Blue and Biophilic .- 2. Planning the Balance of Danger and Delight .- 3. Unsustainable Bounties for the Blue: Cities to the Rescue? .- 4. Making the Marine World Visible - Fostering Emotional Connections to the Sea .- 5. Reimagining the Blue Edge .- 6. Just Blue (and Biophilic) Cities .- 7. Conclusions and Trajectories: Final Reflection on Blue, Biophilic Urbanism.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319679549 20180122
There is a growing recognition of the contact we need with nature to be happy, healthy and to lead meaningful lives. We need that nature daily, if not hourly, and so it must be nearby to where we live and work. This is central to the concept of `biophilic cities' which is emerging as a global movement and guiding framework for city design and planning. Blue Biophilic Cities is about the promise of this movement and a kind of biophilic urbanism that is possible for cities perched on the edge of harbours and seas. In blue biophilic cities, much of the nearby nature is to be found in the marine realm. This book explores the efforts underway in a number of cities to foster new marine connections through a variety of innovative programs and initiatives. It also discusses a number of design ideas, from dynamic shoreline edges and floodable parks to living breakwaters, in order to emphasise the possibility of designing for resilience while also supporting marine biodiversity and strengthening biophilic connections to the marine world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319679549 20180122
Book
xiii, 304 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxii, 252 pages ; 22 cm
  • List of Tables. Glossary. Preface and Acknowledgements. Introduction to the Second Edition. Introduction: The Idea of Caste. I: Hierarchies and the Politics of Citizenship 1. Pollution and Prejudice: Vestiges of Untouchability in Rural Punjab 2. Atrocities and Resistance: Dalit Assertions for Citizenship 3. Caste and Democratic Politics: A Differentiated View II: Caste in the Neo-Liberal Economy 4. Dalits in Business: Self-Employed Scheduled Castes in Urban India 5. `Caste-Blinding' and Corporate Hiring Part Three: Mobility and Mobilizations 6. Social Mobility and Quest for Autonomy: Global Contours of Ravidasi Identity 7. Battling for Dignity: Dalit Activists of Delhi. Conclusions: The Futures of Caste. Bibliography. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815381211 20180213
Caste is a contested terrain in India's society and polity. This book explores contemporary realities of caste in rural and urban India. It examines questions of untouchability, citizenship, social mobility, democratic politics, corporate hiring and Dalit activism. Using rich empirical evidence from the field across Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Delhi and other parts of north India, this volume presents the reasons for the persistence of caste in India from a new perspective. The book offers an original theoretical framework for comparative understandings of the entrenched social differences, discrimination, inequalities, stratification, and the modes and patterns of their reproduction. This second edition, with a new Introduction, delves into why caste continues to matter and how caste-based divisions often tend to overlap with the emergent disparities of the new economy. A delicate balance of lived experience and hard facts, this persuasive work will serve as essential reading for students and teachers of sociology and social anthropology, social exclusion and discrimination studies, political science, development studies and public policy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815381211 20180213
Green Library
Book
xii, 217 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: New Urbanisms, New Citizens Chapter 1: Towards the interdisciplinary study of children and sustainable urbanism Chapter 2: Sustainable urbanisms in policy and practice Chapter 3: Living with sustainable urban technologies Chapter 4: Sustainable mobilities Chapter 5: Constituting Communities: welcoming, belonging, excluding Chapter 6: Vital Politics: children and young people's participation in public space and local decision-making Chapter 7: Making space for vitality in sustainable urbanisms: childhood and play Chapter 8: Conclusion: towards a theory of children and sustainable urban vitalities.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138809406 20180213
Urban living has dramatically changed over the past generation, refashioning children's relationships with the towns and cities in which they live, and the modes of living within them. Focusing on the global shift in urban planning towards sustainable urbanism - from master planned `sustainable communities', to the green retrofitting of existing urban environments - Children Living in Sustainable Built Environments offers a critical analysis of the challenges, tensions and opportunities for children and young people living in these environments. Drawing upon original data, Children Living in Sustainable Built Environments demonstrates how the needs, interests and participation of children and young people often remain inferior to the design, planning and local politics of new urban communities. Considering children from their crucial role as residents engaging and contributing to the vitalities of their community, to their role as consumers using and understanding sustainable design features, the book critically discusses the prospects of future inclusion of children and young people as a social group in sustainable urbanism. Truly interdisciplinary, Children Living in Sustainable Built Environments forms an original theoretical and empirical contribution to the understanding of the everyday lives of children and young people and will appeal to academics and students in the fields of education, childhood studies, sociology, anthropology, human geography and urban studies, as well as policy-makers, architects, urban planners and other professionals working on sustainable urban designs.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138809406 20180213
Green Library
Book
xii, 116 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • List of illustrations Acknowledgements Chapter 1: Introducing the book 1.1 Reflecting on the current debate 1.2 The contribution and the limitations of this book 1.3 Outline Chapter 2: Causes of urban-economic inequality and segregation 2.1 Macro processes and inequality 2.2 Inequality between cities 2.3 Growing inequalities in cities 2.4 Economic segregation in cities Chapter 3: Reflecting on the measurement 3.1 How to measure inequality? 3.1.1 The Gini coefficient 3.1.2 Limits to the scope 3.2 How to measure segregation? 3.2.1 The dissimilarity index 3.2.2 Sensitivity to measurement choices 3.2.3 Limits to the scope 3.3 Inequality and segregation of what? 3.3.1 Wage, income or capital 3.3.2 From gross incomes to standard of living 3.4 A dynamic perspective on inequality and segregation Chapter 4: Reflecting on the (negative) societal impact 4.1 The negative impact of economic inequality 4.1.1 Effects on economic growth 4.1.2 Health and social effects 4.2 The negative impact of economic segregation 4.2.1 Mechanisms underlying neighbourhood effects 4.2.2 Identification of neighbourhood effects 4.2.3 From individual effects to city level effects Chapter 5: Reflecting on the moral implications 5.1 Equality and distributional justice 5.2 The pie metaphor 5.3 Good and bad economic inequality 5.4 The impracticability of aiming for economic equality 5.5 The same or enough? About the moral relevance of economic inequality 5.6 The moral relevance of (economic) segregation 5.7 Reflecting on the material dimension of economic inequality and segregation Chapter 6: Reflecting on urban policy 6.1 Summary of the book 6.2 Redistribution of money 6.3 Redistribution of people List of key concepts and definitions Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138283992 20171211
Increasing economic inequality in cities, and the spatial translation of that into more segregated neighbourhoods, is top of the political agenda in developed countries. While the overall living standards have increased in the last century, the focus has now shifted from poverty to economic differences, with a particular focus on the gap between the very poor and the (ultra-)rich. The authors observe a common view among policy-makers and researchers alike: that urban-economic inequality and segregation are increasing; that this increase is bad; and that money and people (in the case of segregation) need to be redistributed in response. In six compact chapters, this book enriches and broadens the debate. Chapters bring together the literature on the social effects of economic inequality and segregation and question whether there are sizable effects and what their direction (positive or negative) is. The often conflated concepts of economic inequality (and segregation) and social injustice is disentangled and the moral implications are reflected on. The book is essential reading for students and academics of Planning Theory, Planning Ethics, Urban Geography, Urban Economics, Economic Geography and Urban Sociology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138283992 20171211
Green Library
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Part 1: Principles, Approaches and Projects on Change Adaptation in Coastal Areas.- "We're not refugees, we'll stay here until we die!" - Climate change adaptation and migration experiences gathered from the Tulun and Nissan Atolls of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea.- Sustainable Small-scale Mariculture Ventures as a Comparative Climate Friendly Livelihood Alternative in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia.- Planning and Urban Informality - Addressing Inclusiveness for Climate Resilience in the Pacific.- At the Frontline of Climate Change: Adaptation, Limitations and Way Forward for the South Pacific Island States.- Enhancing adaptive capacity and climate change resilience of coastal communities in Yap.- Capacity Development and TVET: Accredited Qualifications for improving resilience of coastal communities - a Vanuatu case study.- An Evaluation of Climate Change Effects on Fishermen and Adaption Strategies in Central Region, Ghana.- Retreat or Rebuild: Exploring Geographic Retreat in Humanitarian Practices in Coastal Communities.- "God and Tonga are my inheritance!" - Climate change impact on perceived spirituality, adaptation and lessons learnt from Kanokupolu, `Ahau, Tukutonga, Popua and Manuka in Tongatapu, Tonga .- Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA) for Coastal Resilience against Water related Disasters in Bangladesh.- Part 2: Case Studies on Climate Change Adaptation in Coastal Areas.- Black Pearl Farming as an Adaptation to Coastal Climate Change.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319707020 20180129
This book presents a comprehensive overview of research and projects regarding climate change adaptation in coastal areas, providing government and nongovernment bodies with a sound basis to promote climate change adaptation efforts.According to the 5th Assessment Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), coastal zones are highly vulnerable to climate change, and climate-driven impacts may be further exacerbated by other human-induced pressures. Apart from sea-level rise, which poses a threat to both human well-being and property, extreme events such as cyclones and storm surges lead not only to significant damage to property and infrastructure, but also to salt water intrusion, groundwater salinisation, and intensified soil erosion, among many other problems. There are also numerous negative impacts on the natural environment and biodiversity, including damage to important wetlands and habitats that safeguard the overall ecological balance, and consequently the provision of ecosystem services and goods on which the livelihoods of millions of people depend. As such, there is a need for a better understanding of how climate change affects coastal areas and communities, and for the identification of processes, methods and tools that can help the countries and communities in coastal areas to adapt and become more resilient. It is against this background that this book has been produced. It includes papers written by scholars, social movements, practitioners and members of governmental agencies, pursuing research and/or executing climate change projects in coastal areas and working with coastal communities. Focusing on "managing climate change in coastal regions", it showcases valuable lessons learned from research and field projects and presents best practices to foster climate change adaptation in coastal areas and communities, which can be implemented elsewhere.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319707020 20180129
Book
xix, 227 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • Few safe harbors : Peter M. Douglas's formative years
  • California's coast : its origins and pre-commission development
  • Sea change : California's environmental surge
  • Coastal conservation, politics, and a new commission
  • High tide : the executive director years
  • Ebb tide : the receding years
  • Footprints in sand : Peter Douglas's legacy
  • Appendix A : a selected time line, California coastal conservation and Peter Douglas
  • Appendix B : a selected list of Peter Douglas's accomplishments and honors.
There are moments when we forget how fortunate we are to have the California coast. The state is home to 1,100 miles of uninterrupted coastline defined by long stretches of beach and jagged rocky cliffs. Coastal Sage chronicles the career and accomplishments of Peter Douglas, the longest-serving executive director of the California Coastal Commission. For nearly three decades, Douglas fought to keep the California coast public, prevent overdevelopment, and safeguard habitat. In doing so, Douglas emerged as a leading figure in the contemporary American environmental movement and influenced public conservation efforts across the country. He coauthored California's foundational laws pertaining to shoreline management and conservation: Proposition 20 and the California Coastal Act. Many of the political battles to save the coast from overdevelopment and secure public access are revealed for the first time in this study of the leader who was at once a visionary, warrior, and coastal sage.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520296657 20180129
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xix, 227 pages) : maps, illustrations.
  • Few safe harbors : Peter Douglas's formative years
  • California's coast : its origins and pre-commission development
  • Sea change : California's environmental surge
  • Coastal conservation, politics, and a new commission
  • High tide : the executive director years
  • Ebb tide : the receding years
  • Footprints in sand : Peter Douglas's legacy
  • Appendix A : a selected time line, California coastal conservation and Peter Douglas
  • Appendix B : a selected list of Peter Douglas's accomplishments and honors.
There are moments when we forget how fortunate we are to have the California coast. The state is home to 1,100 miles of uninterrupted coastline defined by long stretches of beach and jagged rocky cliffs. Coastal Sage chronicles the career and accomplishments of Peter Douglas, the longest-serving executive director of the California Coastal Commission. For nearly three decades, Douglas fought to keep the California coast public, prevent overdevelopment, and safeguard habitat. In doing so, Douglas emerged as a leading figure in the contemporary American environmental movement and influenced public conservation efforts across the country. He coauthored California's foundational laws pertaining to shoreline management and conservation: Proposition 20 and the California Coastal Act. Many of the political battles to save the coast from overdevelopment and secure public access are revealed for the first time in this study of the leader who was at once a visionary, warrior, and coastal sage.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520296657 20171227

11. Data and the city [2018]

Book
xix, 229 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of Figures List of Tables List of Contributors Chapter 1 Data and the City by Rob Kitchin, Tracey P. Lauriault and Gavin McArdle Part I: Data-Driven Cities Chapter 2 A city is not a galaxy: Understanding the city through urban data by Martijn de Waal Chapter 3 Data about cities: Redefining big, recasting small by Michael Batty Chapter 4 Data-driven urbanism by Rob Kitchin Part II: Urban Data Chapter 5 Crime data and analytics: Accounting for crime in the city by Teresa Scassa Chapter 6 Data provenance and possibility: thoughts towards a provenance schema for urban data by Jim Thatcher and Craig Dalton Chapter 7 Following data threads by James Merrick White Chapter 8 Sticky data - context and friction in the use of urban data proxies by Dietmar Offenhuber Part III: Urban Data Technologies Chapter 9 Urban data and city dashboards: Six key issues by Rob Kitchin and Gavin McArdle Chapter 10 Sharing and analysing data in smart cities by Pouria Amirian and Anahid Basiri Chapter 11 Blockchain City: Economic, social and cognitive ledgers by Chris Speed, Deborah Maxwell and Larissa Pschetz Chapter 12 Situating data infrastructures by Till Straube Chapter 13 Ontologizing the City by Tracey P. Lauriault Part IV: Urban Data Cultures and Power Chapter 14 Data cultures, power and the city by Jo Bates Chapter 15 Where are data citizens? by Evelyn Ruppert Chapter 16 Beyond quantification: a role for citizen science and community science in a smart city by Mordechai (Muki) Haklay Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138222632 20171201
There is a long history of governments, businesses, science and citizens producing and utilising data in order to monitor, regulate, profit from, and make sense of the urban world. Recently, we have entered the age of big data, and now many aspects of everyday urban life are being captured as data and city management mediated through data-driven technologies. Data and the City is the first edited collection to provide an interdisciplinary analysis of how we come to know and govern cities and the implications of such a transformation. This book looks at the creation of real-time cities and data-driven urbanism and considers the relationships at play. By taking a philosophical, political, practical and technical approach to urban data, the authors analyse the ways in which data is produced and framed within socio-technical systems. They then examine the constellation of existing and emerging urban data technologies. The volume concludes by considering the social and political ramification of data-driven urbanism, questioning whom it serves and for what ends. This book, the companion volume to 2016's Code and the City, offers the first critical reflection on the relationship between data, data practices and the city, and how we come to know and understand cities through data. It will be crucial reading for those who wish to understand and conceptualize urban big data, data-driven urbanism, and the development of smart cities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138222632 20171201
Green Library
Book
xx, 303 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • 1.Introduction. Defining the Urban: Why Do We Need Definitions? Part I: Academic Disciplines 2. Sociology: The Sociological "Urban" 3.Geography: Rethinking the "Urban" and Urbanization 4. Anthropology: The Death and Rebirth of Urban Anthropology 5.History: Understanding "Urban" from the Disciplinary Viewpoint of History 6.Economics 7.Ecology: Science and Ethics 8.Environmental Psychology: Views of the "Urban" from Environmental Psychology Part II: Professional Practices 9.Public Policy: Looking for the "Urban" in Public Policy 10.Architecture and Urban Design: Leaving Behind the Notion of the City 11.Civil Engineering: Unlocking the Potential of Future Cities through Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure 12.Urban Planning 13.Urban Governance: Transcending Conventional Urban Governance 14.Social Work: Social Work Intersections with Urbanism 15.Public Health: Urban Health: History, Definitions, and Approaches 16.Law: The Concept of "Urban" in Law Part III: Emerging Approaches 17.Geospatial Techniques 18.Urban Political Ecology: Landscapes of Power 19.Urban Metabolism: Conceptualizing the City as an Organism 20.Transition Theories 21.Complexity Science: The Urban is a Complex Adaptive System 22.Science Fiction: The Urban in Posthuman Science Fiction Synthesis 23.Defining the Urban: A Quixotic Pursuit.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472449528 20171121
What is "urban"? How can it be described and contextualised? How is it used in theory and practice? Urban processes feature in key international policy and practice discourses. They are at the core of research agendas across traditional academic disciplines and emerging interdisciplinary fields. However, the concept of "the urban" remains highly contested, both as material reality and imaginary construct. The urban remains imprecisely defined. Defining the Urban is an indispensable guide for the urban transdisciplinary thinker and practitioner. Parts I and II focus on how "Academic Disciplines" and "Professional Practices, " respectively, understand and engage with the urban. Included, among others, are Architecture, Ecology, Governance and Sociology. Part III, "Emerging Approaches, " outlines how elements from theory and practice combine to form transdisciplinary tools and perspectives. Written by eminent experts in their respective fields, Defining the Urban provides a stepping stone for the development of a common language-a shared ontology-in the disjointed fields of urban research and practice. It is a comprehensive and accessible resource for anyone with an interest in understanding how urban scholars and practitioners can work together on this complex theme.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781472449528 20171121
Green Library
Book
xii, 244 pages : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Human needs
  • Embedding and receiving the messages in the urban environment
  • What makes a place nurturing or neglectful?
  • Living in the compassionate city
  • Play quarters, London : breaking down the barriers to playing out on the streets of London
  • Benches collective, various locations in the Netherlands and overseas : cultivating street life
  • Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park, London : protecting and enhancing accessible wilderness
  • De Ceuvel, Amsterdam : inspiring waterside rehabilitation
  • Woonerven, The Netherlands and overseas : handwiring streets to be shared
  • Christie Walk, Adelaide : designing to inspire, community-led urban infill residential development
  • The secular pilgrimage and South Melbourne Commons, Melbourne : recognizing and respecting the many layers of an inner-urban, gentrifying community
  • Stewartstown Road Centre, Belfast : softening the barriers between communities
  • UN habitat placemaking projects in West Bank villages, Palestine : self-determination 101
  • The obstacles and pitfalls to creating places where people thrive
  • Designing the compassionate city
  • Applying compassionate city principles
  • Conclusions.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
ix, 213 pages ; 23 cm
  • Preface and Acknowledgements Introduction: Read This First Step 1: Chip Away at the False Ideology that Race is Biological Step 2: See the Racism Machine Step 3: Examine the Racism Machine's Powerful Mechanisms Step 4: Analyze the Racism Machine's Recalibration after the Civil Rights Movement Step 5: Take Apart the Racism Machine.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138037229 20180129
While scholars have been developing valuable research on race and racism for decades, this work does not often reach the beginning college student or the general public, who rarely learn a basic history of race and racism. If we are to dismantle systemic racism and create a more just society, people need a place to begin. This accessible, introductory, and interdisciplinary guide can be one such place. Grounded in critical race theory, this book uses the metaphor of the Racism Machine to highlight that race is a social construct and that racism is a system of oppression based on invented racial categories. It debunks the false ideology that race is biological. As a manual, this book presents clear instructions for understanding the history of race, including whiteness, starting in colonial America, where the elite created a hierarchy of racial categories to maintain their power through a divide-and-conquer strategy. As a toolbox, this book provides a variety of specific action steps that readers can take once they have developed a foundational understanding of the history of white supremacy, a history that includes how the Racism Machine has been recalibrated to perpetuate racism in a supposedly "post-racial" era.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138037229 20180129
Green Library
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (black and white)
Rich in anthropological detail and incisive analyses, The Fall of Gods makes original contributions to the understanding of connection between gendered family relations and class mobility, and foregrounds the complex linkages between political history, memory, and the private domain of kinship relations, in the making of Indias middle classes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199469307 20180205
Book
xvii, 359 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • List of figures List of tables List of contributors Acknowledgements Introduction: The Ghetto Made and Remade Wendy Z. Goldman and Joe W. Trotter ã ã Part I: The Early Modern Jewish Ghetto 1 - Ghetto: Etymology, Original Definition, Reality, and Diffusion Benjamin Ravid 2 - The End to Confessionalism: Jews, Law, and the Roman Ghetto Kenneth Stow 3 - The Early Modern Ghetto: A Study in Urban Real Estate Bernard Cooperman 4 - Venice: A Culture of Enclosure, a Culture of Control. The Creation of the Ghetto in the Context of Early Cinquecento Samuel D. Gruber ã ã Part II: Nazi Ghettos ã 5 - "There was no work, we only worked for the Germans":ã Ghettos and Ghetto labor in German-occupied Soviet territories Anika Walke 6 - Hunger in the Ghettos Helene Sinnreich 7 - Am I Myã Brother'sã Keeper? Jewish Committees in the Ghettos of the Mogilev district and the Romanian authorities in Transnistria, 1941 to 1944 Gali Mir-Tibon 8 - Jewish Resistance in Ghettos in the former Soviet Union during the Holocaust Zvi Gitelman and Lenore J. Weitzman 9 - When (and why) is a ghetto notã a "ghetto"?ã Concentrating and Segregating Jews in Budapest, 1944 Tim Cole Part III: U.S. and African American Ghettos 10 - Shifting "Ghettos":ã Established Jews, Jewish Immigrants and African-Americans in Chicago 1880-1960 Tobias Brinkman 11 - "Is a Negro district, in the midst of our fairest cities, to become connotative of the ghetto...?": Using Corpus Analysis to Trace the "Ghetto" in the Black Press, 1900-1930 Avigail Oren 12 - Constrained But Not Contained: Patterns of Everyday Life and the Limits of Segregation in 1920s Harlem Stephen Robertson 13 - The American Ghetto as an International Human Rights Crisis: The Fight Against Racial Restrictive Covenants, 1945-1948 Jeffrey Gonda 14 - Unmaking the Ghetto: Community Development and Persistent Social Inequality in Brooklyn, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia Brian Purnell ã Part IV: Urban Locations, Apartheid, and the Ghetto in Southern Africa 15 - "Their World Was a Ghetto:" Space, Power and Identity in Alexandra, South Africa'sã Squatters' Movement, 1946-47 Dawne Curry 16 - Citizens, not Subjects: Spatial Segregation and the Making of Durban's African Working Class Alex Lichtenstein 17 - Location Culture in South Africa Gavin Steingo Conclusion: Common Themes and New Directions Wendy Z. Goldman and Joe W. Trotter Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138282308 20180129
The Ghetto in Global History explores the stubborn tenacity of `the ghetto' over time. As a concept, policy, and experience, the ghetto has served to maintain social, religious, and racial hierarchies over the past five centuries. Transnational in scope, this book allows readers to draw thought-provoking comparisons across time and space among ghettos that are not usually studied alongside one another. The volume is structured around four main case studies, covering the first ghettos created for Jews in early modern Europe, the Nazis' use of ghettos, the enclosure of African Americans in segregated areas in the United States, and the extreme segregation of blacks in South Africa. The contributors explore issues of discourse, power, and control; examine the internal structures of authority that prevailed; and document the lived experiences of ghetto inhabitants. By discussing ghettos as both tools of control and as sites of resistance, this book offers an unprecedented and fascinating range of interpretations of the meanings of the "ghetto" throughout history. It allows us to trace the circulation of the idea and practice over time and across continents, revealing new linkages between widely disparate settings. Geographically and chronologically wide-ranging, The Ghetto in Global History will prove indispensable reading for all those interested in the history of spatial segregation, power dynamics, and racial and religious relations across the globe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138282308 20180129
Green Library
Book
xxix, 481 pages : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm.
  • List of Plates Lists of figures List of tables List of contributors Editor's Introduction to Second Edition Acknowledgements PART 1 FOUNDATIONS Introduction to Part One 1.0 Prologue The Metropolitan Explosion Peter Hall 1.1 Divisions of Space and Time in Europe Fernand Braudel 1.2 World City Formation: An Agenda for Research and Action John Friedmann and Goetz Wolff 1.3 Locating Cities on Global Circuits Saskia Sassen 1.4 Urban Specialization in the World System Nestor Rodriguez and Joe Feagin 1.5 Accumulation and Comparative Urban Systems John Walton 1.6 The World-System Perspective and Urbanization Michael Timberlake 1.7 Global City Formation in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles: An Historical Perspective Janet Abu-Lughod 1.8 Global and World Cities: A View from Off the Map Jennifer Robinson 1.9 Space in the Globalizing City Peter Marcuse PART 2 PATHWAYS Introduction to Part Two 2.0 Prologue Istanbul was our past, Istanbul is our future Hamid Dabashi 2.1 The City as a Landscape of Power: London and New York as Global Financial Capitals Sharon Zukin 2.2 Detroit and Houston: Two Cities in Global Perspective Richard C. Hill and Joe Feagin 2.3 The Stimulus of a Little Confusion: A Contemporary Comparison of Amsterdam and Los Angeles Edward Soja 2.4 Global City Zurich: Paradigms of Urban Development Christian Schmid 2.5 From `State-Owned' to `City Inc.': The Re-territorialization of the State in Shanghai Fulong Wu 2.6 The Dream of Delhi as a Global City Veronica Dupont 2.7 `Fourth World' Cities in the Global Economy: The Case of Phnom Penh Gavin Shatkin 2.8 Medellin and Bogota: The Global Cities of the Other Globalization Eduardo Mendieta PART 3 RELATIONS Introduction to Part Three 3.0 Prologue Specification of the World City Network Peter Taylor 3.1 Local and Global: Cities in Network Society Manuel Castells 3.2 Comparing London and Frankfurt as World Cities: A Relational Study of Contemporary Urban Change Jonathan V. Beaverstock, Michael Hoyler, Kathryn Pain, and Peter J. Taylor 3.3 Global Grids of Glass: On Global Cities, Telecommunication and Planetary Urban Networks Stephen Graham 3.4 Global Cities and the Spread of Infectious Disease: The Case of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Toronto, Canada S. Harris Ali and Roger Keil 3.5 Flying High (in the Competitive Sky): Conceptualizing the Role of Airports in Global City-Regions through `Aero-Regionalism' Jean-Paul Addie 3.6 One Package at a Time: The Distributive World City Cynthia Negrey, Jeffery L. Osgood, and Frank Goetzke 3.7 Global Cities between Biopolitics and Necropolitics: (In)Security and Circuits of Knowledge in the Global City Network David Murakami-Wood 3.8 The Virtual Palimpsest of the Global City Network Mark Graham 3.9 Relationality/territoriality: Toward conceptualization of cities in the world Eugene McCann and Kevin Ward PART 4 REGULATIONS Introduction to Part Four 4.0 Prologue The Global City as World Order Warren Magnusson 4.1 Globalization and the Rise of City-regions Allen J. Scott 4.2 Global Cities, `Global States': Global City Formation and State Territorial Restructuring in Contemporary Europe Neil Brenner 4.3 Global Cities and Developmental States: Tokyo and Seoul Richard Child Hill and June Woo Kim 4.4 World City Formation on the Asia Pacific Rim: Poverty, "Everyday" Forms of Civil Society and Environmental Management Mike Douglass 4.5 New Globalism, New Urbanism: Gentrification as Global Urban Strategy Neil Smith 4.6 Between World History and State Formation: New Perspectives on Africa's Cities Laurent Fourchard 4.7 The `Right to the City': Institutional Imperatives of a Developmental State Susan Parnell and Edgar Pieterse 4.8 Global Cities' vs. `global cities:' Rethinking Contemporary Urbanism as Public Ecology Timothy W. Luke PART 5 CONTESTATIONS Introduction to Part Five 5.0 Prologue From Tahrir Square to Emaar Square: Cairo's private road to a private city Mohamed Elshahed 5.1 Local Actors in Global Politics Saskia Sassen 5.2 The Right to the City David Harvey 5.3 Urban Social Movements in an Era of Globalization Margit Mayer 5.4 Sao Paulo: The City and its Protest Teresa Caldeira 5.5 Global City Building in China and its Discontents Xuefei Ren 5.6 Between Ghetto and Globe: Remaking Urban Life in Africa AbdouMaliq Simone 5.7 World Cities and Union Renewal Steven Tufts 5.8 Blockupy Fights Back: Global City Formation in Frankfurt am Main after the Financial Crisis Sebastian Schipper, Lucas Pohl, Tino Petzold, Daniel Mullis, and Bernd Belina PART 6 CULTURE Introduction to Part Six 6.0 Prologue: High Culture and Hard Labor Andrew Ross 6.1 World Cities: Global? Postcolonial? Postimperial? Or Just the Result of Happenstance? Some Cultural Comments Anthony King 6.2 "Global Media Cities": Major Nodes of Globalising Culture and Media Industries Stefan Kratke 6.3 Willing the Global City: Berlin's Cultural Strategies of Inter-Urban Competition after 1989 Ute Lehrer 6.4 The Transnational Capitalist Class and Contemporary Architecture in Globalizing Cities Leslie Sklair 6.5 Shanghai Nightscapes and Ethnosexual Contact Zones James Farrer and Andrew Field 6.6 Graffiti or Street Art? Negotiating the Moral Geographies of the Creative City Cameron McAuliffe 6.7 Spaces and Networks of Musical Creativity in the city Allan Watson, Michael Hoyler and Christoph Mager 6.8 Provincializing the Global City: From Bombay to Mumbai Rashimi Varma PART 7 FRONTIERS Introduction to Part Seven 7.0 Prologue World City Doreen Massey 7.1 The Global Cities Discourse: A Return to the Master Narrative? Michael Peter Smith 7.2 External Urban Relational Processes: Introducing Central Flow Theory to Complement Central Place Theory Peter J. Taylor, Michael Hoyler and Raf Verbruggen 7.3 Beyond the Global City Concept and the Myth of `Command and Control' Richard G. Smith 7.4 World Cities under Conditions of Financialized Globalization: Towards an Augmented World City Hypothesis David Bassens and Michiel van Meeteren 7.5 Can the Straw Man Speak? An Engagement with Postcolonial Critiques of `Global Cities Research' Michiel van Meeteren, Ben Derudder, and David Bassens 7.6 Global Suburbanization Roger Keil 7.7 What is Urban about Critical Urban Theory? Ananya Roy 7.8 Planetary Urbanization Neil Brenner and Christian Schmid 7.9 New Geographies of Theorizing the Urban: Putting Comparison to Work for Global Urban Studies Jennifer Robinson 7.10 Governing the Informal in Globalizing Cities: Comparing China, India, and Brazil Xuefei Ren 7.11 The Urban Revolution Henri Lefebvre Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138923690 20180122
The newly revised Globalizing Cities Reader reflects how the geographies of theory have recently shifted away from the western vantage points from which much of the classic work in this field was developed. The expanded volume continues to make available many of the original and foundational works that underpin the research field, while expanding coverage to familiarize students with new theoretical and epistemological positions as well as emerging research foci and horizons. It contains 38 new chapters, including key writings on globalizing cities from leading thinkers such as John Friedmann, Michael Peter Smith, Saskia Sassen, Peter Taylor, Manuel Castells, Anthony King, Jennifer Robinson, Ananya Roy, and Fulong Wu. The new Reader reflects the fact that world and global city studies have evolved in exciting and wide-ranging ways, and the very notion of a distinct "global" class of cities has recently been called into question. The sections examine the foundations of the field and processes of urban restructuring and global city formation. A large number of new entries focus on the emerging urban worlds of Asia, Latin America and Africa, including Beijing, Bogota, Cairo, Cape Town, Delhi, Istanbul, Medellin, Mumbai, Phnom Penh, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, and Shanghai. The book also presents cases off the conventional map of global cities research, such as smaller cities and less known urban regions that are undergoing processes of globalization. The book is a key resource for students and scholars alike who seek an accessible compendium of the intellectual foundations of global urban studies as well as an overview of the emergent patterns of early 21st century urbanization and associated sociopolitical contestation around the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138923690 20180122
Green Library
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (black and white)
In The Help-Yourself City, Gordon Douglas looks closely at the people who take urban planning into their own hands, dubbed "do-it-yourself urban design" and exposes the ways that DIY urban design are increasingly celebrated and appropriated into economic development efforts that perpetuate cycles of inequality for disadvantaged communities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190691332 20180205
Book
xxi, 247 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
456 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 24 cm
  • PREFACEACKNOWLEDGMENTSABOUT THE AUTHORSPART I. INTRODUCTION TO RACE AND THE SOCIAL MATRIXChapter 1. Race and the Social Construction of Difference The Social Construction of Race The Social Matrix of Race The Operation of Racism Our Stories Key Terms Chapter SummaryChapter 2. The Shaping of a Nation: The Social Construction of Race in America Race Today: Adapting and Evolving Indigenous Peoples: The Americas before Columbus Discovery and Encounters: The Shaping of Our Storied Past The U.S. Matrix and Intersectionality- Where Do We Go from Here? Key Terms Chapter SummaryPART II. THE MATRIX PERSPECTIVE ON SOCIAL INSTITUTIONSChapter 3. The Social Construction and Regulation of Families Historical Regulation of the Family Family Inequality Theories Family Inequality through the Matrix Lens Transforming the Ideal Family Narrative Key Terms Chapter SummaryChapter 4. Work and Wealth Inequality Recent Trends in Work and Wealth Theories of Economic Inequality Applying the Matrix to the History of Economic Inequality in the United States Transforming the Story of Race and Economic Inequality Key Terms Chapter SummaryChapter 5. Health, Medicine, and Health Care Patterns of Inequality in Health and Health Care Theorizing Inequality in Health and Health Care Applying the Matrix to Health Inequity and Inequality Resisting and Transforming Inequality in Health and Health Care Key Terms Chapter SummaryChapter 6. Education The Shaping of the Matrix of U.S. Education Theories of Education Examining the Concealed Story of Race and Education through the Matrix Alternative Educational Movements and the Future of Education Key Terms Chapter SummaryChapter 7. Crime, Law, and Deviance A History of Race, Crime, and Punishment Sociological Stock Theories of Crime and Deviance Applying the Matrix to Crime and Deviance Transforming the Narrative of Race, Crime, and Deviance Key Terms Chapter SummaryChapter 8. Power, Politics, and Identities Contemporary Political Identities Critiquing Sociological Theories of Power, Politics, and Identity Applying the Matrix of Race to U.S. Political History Building Alternatives to the Matrix of Race and Politics Key Terms Chapter SummaryChapter 9. Sports and the American Dream The State of Sport Today Examining Stock Sociological Theories of Sport Applying the Matrix to Sports in the United States Creating a New Playing Field Key Terms Chapter SummaryChapter 10. The Military, War, and Terrorism Class, Gender, and Race in the U.S. Military Military Sociology Stock Theories Applying the Matrix Approach to U.S. Military History, War, and Terrorism A More Inclusive Future Key Terms Chapter SummaryConclusionGLOSSARYREFERENCESINDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781452202693 20180122
The Matrix of Race, for race and ethnic relations courses, is written by three leading scholars -- Rodney D. Coates, David L. Brunsma, and Abby L. Ferber -- and reflects a very contemporary way of looking at race, minorities, and intergroup relations. Older texts use a "categorical" approach and feature a series of chapters that examine one minority group at a time (African Americans, Latino/a Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans, etc.). Newer texts designed within the last 5-10 years are more likely to be organized topically, discuss various racial and ethnic minorities within the context of these topics, and use the most current theories and perspectives in this field. The Matrix of Race is built around these core ideas: -Race is a both a social construction and a social institution -Race is intersectional--it is embedded within other statuses (such as gender, social class, sexuality) -Concepts of race change over time and as we move from one physical location to another -We are all active agents in upholding, reproducing, or resisting constructions of race.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781452202693 20180122
Green Library